Arthur Herbert Lindsay Richardson VC.

Arthur Herbert Lindsay Richardson (23/09/1872 –  15/12/1932) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at Wolvespruit, about 15 miles north of Standerton, Transvaal, South Africa, on 5 July 1990.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 27229 Page: 5688, reads:

“Lord Strathcona’s Corps

Sergeant Arthur Herbert Lindsey Richardson

On the 5th July, 1900, at Wolve Spruit, about 15 miles north of Standerton, a party of Lord Strathcona’s Corps, only 38 in number, came into contact, and was engaged at close quarters, with a force of 80 of the enemy. 
When the order to retire had been given, Sergeant Richardson rode back under a very heavy cross-fire and picked up a trooper whose horse had been shot and who was wounded in two places and rode with him out of fire. 
At the time when this act of gallantry was performed, Sergeant Richardson was within 300 yards of the enemy, and was himself riding a wounded horse.”

He is buried in St James Cemetery, Liverpool, and the headstone is erected  on the patch of lawn between the cemetery entrance and Liverpool Anglican Cathedral

DRW © 2018. Created 05/06/2018.  Taddy &Co cigarette card by Card Promotions, ©1997, first issued 1902.

John Joseph Sims VC

John Joseph Sims (1835 – 06/12/1881) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions following the assault on the Redan on 18 June 1855 during the Crimean War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 659, reads:

“On the 18th June 1855, after his Regiment had retreated back to their trenches following the assault on the Redan, he went out into the open ground, under heavy fire, in broad daylight, and brought in wounded soldiers outside the trenches.”   

Sims died on 6 December 1881, aged 46 in the Union Workhouse, Thavies Inn, City of London from tuberculosis, and was buried in common ground in the City of London Cemetery, Manor Park. On Friday, 11th April 2003, a memorial plaque was placed over the location of his grave. 

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George Leslie Drewry VC

George Leslie Drewry (03/11/1894 – 02/08/1918) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions  at V Beach in the Landing at Cape Helles, during the Gallipoli Campaign. on  25 April 1915.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29264, Page: 8132, reads:

Assisted Commander Unwin at the work of securing the lighters under heavy rifle and maxim fire. He was wounded in the head, but continued his work and twice subsequently attempted to swim from lighter to lighter with a line.” 

The men of HMS River Clyde connected to this action were: George Leslie Drewry, Wilfred St. Aubyn Malleson and George McKenzie Samson commanded by Acting Captain Edward Unwin.

He was accidentally killed at Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands, on 2 August 1918, and is buried in the City of London Cemetery, Manor Park, East London.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 21/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. Gallaher cigarette card by Card Promotions © 2001, first issued 1915. 

Angus Buchanan VC, MC

Angus Buchanan (11/08/1894 –  01/03/1944),  was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during  World War One at Falauyah Lines, Mesopotamia,

The Citation reads:

“For most conspicuous bravery. During an attack an officer was lying out in the open severely wounded about 150 yards from cover. Two men went to his assistance and one of them was hit at once. Captain Buchanan, on seeing this, immediately went out and, with the help of the other man, carried the wounded officer to cover under heavy machine gun fire. He then returned and brought in the wounded man, again under heavy fire.”

He was also awarded the Military Cross in 1916, and was mentioned in despatches four times.

He is buried in Coleford Cemetery, Coleford, Gloucestershire.

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William Alfred Savage VC

William Alfred Savage (30/10/1912 – 28/03/1942) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 28 March 1942 in the attack on St. Nazaire, France, Able Seaman Savage who was a gun-layer of a pom-pom in MGB 314, engaged enemy positions ashore, shooting with great accuracy. Although he had no gun-shield and was in a most exposed position, he continued firing with great coolness until at last he was killed at his gun.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 35566, Page: 2225, reads:

“Able Seaman William Alfred Savage, C/JX.173910

For great gallantry, skill and devotion to duty as gunlayer of the pom-pom in a motor gun boat in the St. Nazaire raid. Completely exposed, and under heavy fire he engaged positions ashore with cool and steady accuracy. On the way. out of the harbour he kept up the same vigorous and accurate fire against the attacking ships, until he was killed at his gun.
This Victoria Cross is awarded in recognition not only of the gallantry and devotion to duty of Able Seaman Savage, but also of the valour shown by many others, unnamed, in Motor Launches, Motor Gun Boats and Motor Torpedo Boats, who gallantly carried out their duty in entirely exposed positions against Enemy fire at very close range.”

 

He was killed in the action and is buried in Town Cemetery, Falmouth

 

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Harry Nicholls VC

Harry Nicholls (21/04/1915 – 11/09/1975) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Second World War in Belgium.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement:, 34909, Page:, 4659 reads:

No. 2614910 Lance-corporal Harry NICHOLLS, Grenadier Guards.

On the 2ist May, 1940, Lance-corporal Nicholls was commanding a section in the right-forward platoon of his company when the company was ordered to counter-attack. At the very start of the advance he was wounded in the arm by shrapnel, but continued to lead his section forward; as the company came over a small ridge, the enemy opened heavy machine-gun fire at close
range

Lance-corporal Nicholls, realising the danger to the company, immediately seized a Bren gun and dashed forward towards the machine-guns, firing from the hip. He succeeded in silencing first one machine-gun and then two other machine-guns, in spite of being again severely wounded.
Lance-corporal Nicholls then went on up to a higher piece of ground and engaged the German infantry massed behind, causing many casualties, and continuing to fire until he had no more ammunition left.
He was wounded at least four times in all, but absolutely refused to give in. There is no doubt that his gallant action was instrumental in enabling his company to reach its objective, and in causing the enemy to fall back across the River Scheldt.
Lance-corporal Nicholls has since been reported to have been killed in action.”

Harry Nichols was not killed in action but was taken as a prisoner of war. He is buried at Wilford Hill Cemetery, Nottingham

Harry Nicholls VC 21/04/1915 - 11/09/1975 Wilford Hill Cemetery, Nottingham

Harry Nicholls VC
21/04/1915 – 11/09/1975
Wilford Hill Cemetery, Nottingham

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Samuel Morley VC

Samuel Morley (12/1829 – 16/06/1888) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the evacuation of Azimgurh by Koer Sing’s Army.

The Citation reads:

“On the evacuation of Azimgurh by Koer Sing’s Army, on the 15th of April, 1858, a Squadron of the Military Train, and half a Troop of Horse Artillery, were sent in pursuit. Upon overtaking them, and coming into action with their rear-guard, a Squadron of the 3rd Seikh Cavalry (also detached in pursuit), and one Troop of the Military Train, were ordered to charge, when Lieutenant Hamilton, who commanded the Seikhs, was unhorsed, and immediately surrounded by the Enemy, who commenced cutting and hacking him whilst on the ground. Private Samuel Morley, seeing the predicament that Lieutenant Hamilton was in, although his (Morley’s) horse had been shot from under him, immediately and most gallantly rushed up, on foot, to his assistance, and in conjunction with Farrier Murphy, who has already received the Victoria Cross for the same thing, cut down one of the Sepoys, and fought over Lieutenant Hamilton’s body, until further assistance came up, and thereby was the means of saving Lieutenant Hamilton from being killed on the spot”.

He is buried in General Cemetery, Nottingham.

Samuel Morley VC 12/1829 - 16/06/1888 General Cemetery, Nottingham

Samuel Morley VC
12/1829 – 16/06/1888
General Cemetery, Nottingham

DRW © 2016-2020. Created 31/10/2016. Image by Mark Green

William Henry Johnson VC MM

William Henry Johnson (15/10/1890 –  25/04/1945) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the First World War at Ramicourt. 

The Citation reads:

For most conspicuous bravery at Ramicourt on the 3rd of October, 1918. When his platoon was held up by a nest of enemy machine guns at very close range, Sjt. Johnson worked his way forward under very heavy fire, and single-handed charged the post, bayoneting several gunners and capturing two machine guns. During this attack he was severely wounded by a bomb, but continued to lead forward his men.

Shortly afterwards the line was once more held up by machine guns. Again he rushed forward and attacked the post singlehanded. With wonderful courage he bombed the garrison, put the guns out of action, and captured the teams.

 He showed throughout the most exceptional gallantry and devotion to duty.”

He is buried in Redhill Cemetery, Nottingham.

William Henry Johnson VC 15/10/1890 -  25/04/1945 Redhill Cemetery, Nottingham

William Henry Johnson VC
15/10/1890 – 25/04/1945
Redhill Cemetery, Nottingham

DRW © 2016-2020. Created 31/10/2016

Walter Richard Parker VC

Walter Richard Parker (20/09/1881- 28/11/1936) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at Gallipoli during the First World War. 

The Citation reads:

On the night of 30 April/1 May 1915 at Gaba Tepe, Gallipoli, Turkey, Lance-Corporal Parker, a volunteer stretcher-bearer, went out with a party of NCOs and men to take ammunition, water and medical stores to an isolated trench containing about 40 men and several wounded. There were no communication trenches leading to the trench, and several men had already been killed in an attempt to reach it.

After crossing an area of about 400 yards swept by machine-gun and rifle fire, Lance-Corporal Parker was alone, the rest of the party having been killed or wounded. On his arrival he gave assistance to the wounded and when the trench was finally evacuated early the next morning, he helped to remove and attend the casualties, although he himself was seriously wounded.”

He is buried in Stapleford Cemetery, Nottingham.

Walter Richard Parker VC 20/09/1881 - 28/11/1936 Stapleford Cemetery, Nottingham

Walter Richard Parker VC
20/09/1881 – 28/11/1936
Stapleford Cemetery, Nottingham

DRW © 2016-2020. Created 31/10/2016. Image by Mark Green

Robert Humpston VC

Robert Humpston (1832 –  22/12/1884) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War.

The Citation reads:

“On 22 April 1855 in the Crimea Private Humpston and Private Joseph Bradshaw, on their own, attacked and captured a Russian rifle pit situated among the rocks overhanging the Woronzoff Road. The pit was occupied every night by the Russians and its capture and subsequent destruction was of great importance.”

He is buried in General Cemetery in Nottingham.

Robert Humpston VC 1832 - 22/12/1884 General Cemetery Nottingham

Robert Humpston VC. 1832 – 22/12/1884. General Cemetery Nottingham

DRW © 2016-2020. Created 31/10/2016. Image by Mark Green