musings while allatsea

Musings of a curious individual

Tag: vintage

Tewkesbury Classic Vehicle Festival 2017 (3)

This page is for everything else! The problem is that there were so many great vehicles on show that I kept on finding more favourites. This is where some of them have ended up. Where I can ID a vehicle I will. Everything else is pot luck.

 

Austin 7 Chummy

 

1904 Mors 24/32 HP

   
 

1923 Amilcar C4

 

“Herbie” branded VW Beetle

 

Fiat 500

 

Singer Gazelle

 

VW 1600

 

Bristol 2 litre

 

Citroen 2CV6 Special

 

1929 Ford Model A

   

1976 William Fourgonette

 

Lomax 3 wheeler

 

Ford

 

Dune buggy

 

Auto Union DKW

 

Willys Jeep

1942 Willys Jeep

 

1932 Lagonda 2 litre

 

Morgan 3 Wheeler

 

1934 British Salmson

 

1957 Rover Sports Tourer

 

Morris Van

 

1963 Heinkel Trojan

 

Bugatti

Bugatti

   
   

There was also a display of motor cycles, but not too many of them were classics.

Wow, some of these may have been seen in South Africa, especially the pickups (bakkies). I will continue with more from the Tewkesbury Classic Vehicle Festival, on the next page (page not completed yet)

forwardbut

© DRW 2017. Created 22/08/2017. All vehicles were on public display. Special thanks to their owners for keeping them on the road for everybody to admire. 

Updated: 22/08/2017 — 12:30

Tewkesbury Classic Vehicle Festival 2017 (2)

Continuing with the Tewkesbury Classic Vehicle Festival.

Of course the event was dominated by British cars of all shapes and colours, and many of them were seen in South Africa long before the emergence of the German and Japanese manufacturers. There was also a smattering of French and Italian cars, but they were definitely in the minority. That is also true in the case of the festival.  

As usual my identification skills are bad, but will do my best, In answer to the question: “why are they all facing in the same direction?” I tried to photograph with the sun behind my back so most of the images ended up facing in the same direction. 

MG TF1500

 

Austin Seven

Anglia

Ford Corsair

Morris “Woody”

Ford Escort 1600

Triumph

Austin A40

Jaguar

Ford XR3i

1956 Ford Anglia Deluxe

 

Lotus Esprit 2.2 Turbo

 

“E” Type Jaguar

 

1952 Alvis TB21 D/H Coupe

 

Austin Cambridge

 

Ford Zephyr

 

1958 Simca Aronde

 

Ford Capri

 

Austin Apache

 

Rolls Royce

As you can see the dominant player seemed to be Ford, and of course heaps of Austins. However, it may only be true of this particular show and not indicative of the state of motoring in the United Kingdom. A number of models that I had seen last year were not here this year, and of course there were so many cars I probably missed seeing quite a few.

The next batch are really odds and ends that caught my fancy and which were found in the UK in years gone by. Once again identification is not my strong point. 

VW Camper (Kombi)

Bedford HA Van

Morris “Police” car

1985 Ford Granada MKII

1927 Morgan Aero

VW Kombi (Fleetline/)

Vauxhall Cresta

Austin A35

Ford Escort 1300

Riley One Point Five

Rover 3500

Austin Healey

MG

Dellow MK2A

Alvis

Austin 7

 

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© DRW 2017. Created 20/08/2017. All vehicles were on public display. Special thanks to their owners for keeping them on the road for everybody to admire. 

Updated: 22/08/2017 — 19:12

Tewkesbury Classic Vehicle Festival 2017 (1)

This morning I headed down to attend the Tewkesbury Classic Vehicle Festival, and I came back with 590 images. Regular readers will know that I also attended the event in 2016 and came back with an equally large amount of images. The problem is that many of the images are interchangeable between this year and last, and the self imposed limitations of the blog are that I can only really have roughly 40 images to a page. Its also important that I try show other aspects of the event, not just heaps of pics of Mini’s and nothing else (naturally we will need a whole page dedicated to the Mini).

 

Let us make one thing straight, I am not a car buff. I don’t know much about them, do not worship them and really see them as a means of transport and nothing else. However, I am a fan of nostalgia and many of these vehicles were around when I was young, and while the models may be differently named they are almost interchangeable between what was available in South Africa with what was available in the United Kingdom. 

At this juncture I would like to extend my thanks to the organisers and the many people who were there with their cars, they were really wonderful to see. Thank you!

Where to start? 

I think just for a change I will start with what I know as “Yank Tanks”. The large American cars that we very rarely saw in South Africa. I am not a boffin so can’t really Identify many of them, although I tried to get a pic of a makers badge or name wherever possible. The one car that I was quite surprised see was an Edsel, the only one I have ever seen (as far as I can remember).

The strange metal rods protruding from the front bumper in the first image was supposedly to warn when you were riding up the pavement! They were not connected to any sensors or warning lights so they are really quite useless if you think about it. 

The next vehicle is really a car from my past. My paternal grandfather had a Studebaker, but I do not know if this was the model that he had. Personally I really think they had the body the wrong way around.  This model is a Studebaker Commander.

   
   

And then there was this long monster of a car… It is a 1959 Cadillac Coupe de Ville and only has two doors (although they are larger than my last car was) and is 5,72 m long

That is a big car!  Go check out the webpage of the people who run her, they have some seriously large cars on it. 

And a Hudson Commodore

Other interesting oddities I saw were:

An Oldsmobile

A Packard.

 

Chevrolet

Chevrolet

 

Ford Falcon

Cadillac Coupe de Ville

 

Cadillac

 

1956 Plymouth Belvedere

 

Chevrolet Caprice Classic

 

Corvette Stingray

 

Buick Eight

 

Chevy Bel Air

 

Ford Mustang

 

Ford Mustang

 

Ford F100

 

A long and low limo…

 

Ford Galaxie XL

 

Chevrolet C10

 

Chevrolet 3100

 

GMC Apache 10

Wow, some of these may have been seen in South Africa, especially the pickups (bakkies). I will continue with more from the Tewkesbury Classic Vehicle Festival, on the next page

forwardbut

© DRW 2017. Created 20/08/2017. All vehicles were on public display. Special thanks to their owners for keeping them on the road for everybody to admire. 

Updated: 22/08/2017 — 12:31

Tewkesbury Mini-steam Weekend 2017

It was that time of the year when Tewkesbury holds a number of events in and around the town. The first event that I attended this year was the mini-steam weekend that was held on the 24th and 25th of June. I attended the event last year too as well as in 2015. I had an information leaflet somewhere but seem to have mislaid it again so will really cheat a bit if I need info. The event is held by the Model Steam Road Vehicle Society. in the grounds of the Tewkesbury Rugby Club.

The engines on display are not the large full sized beasties, but smaller versions that mimic their bigger breathren; and like the full sized vehicles are feats of engineering way beyond my skill level. Realistically most of the machines this year were the same as I saw last year, in fact that was the problem with the event this year, I had seen it before but I do look for the odds and ends that make it different. 

This was the first engine that I saw while I was walking to the event, I have seen this guy quite often with his engine “Jack”, and he seems to thoroughly enjoy himself. The Abbey can be seen in the background of the image. 

The event has the usual mix of traders, enthusiasts, vintage cars and interested parties, and quite a few of the engines were raising steam when I got there.

Oh, and having their brightwork polished. Make no mistake, these machines require lots of time, patience and probably a healthy bank balance too. 

This wonderful showmens engine is typical of that particular type of vehicle with loads of shiney brass fiddly bits.

I am always fascinated by the electrical plant on these machines. It has a certain “Frankensteinish” look about it.

Here are a few of the steamers just waking from their slumbers while their owners had that first cuppa.

There was one exhibit that I ended up rooted to the spot at. It featured a single sided ploughing engine (my terminology may be out of wack though), and I spent quite a lot of time listening to the owner enthusing about his pet project. And, she was a beauty. 

I am no boffin on these things, but this system uses a single ploughing engine, an anchor, with an associated trolley and a double ended tool carrier. Wait, let me see whether I can find a link to explain it all. http://www.steamploughclub.org.uk/index.htm has a nice description on how steam ploughing actually works. In the image above the engine is closest to the camera. The dolly in the middle looks like this. Since the war ended GI Joe has gone into the ploughing industry.

The other end (called a travelling anchor) looks like this….

And it has the large disk-like wheels to prevent it being pulled sideways by the engine with ballast on the opposite side to the engine to prevent it from tipping from the load. A large twin forked anchor is set into the ground ahead of it and it is winched forward to the anchor as the rows are ploughed.  

These models are really magnificent and the owner is rightly proud of them too. I can see why. 

A full sized ploughing engine? they look like this… 

Continuing on my meander I also spotted this quirky steam powered ape. 

Who says steam in not versatile?

While I was walking around a number of engines were making their way to the arena where they circled around in a slightly haphazard way.

You can even use steam to walk the family dog and tow the family around.

There was a small display of vintage cars, and there were some I had not seen before.

And then there was this Kombi in the distance, she should have been in that line-up too.

By now I was considering my homeward trek and stopped at some of the traders tents to look around. The one tent had all of these wonderful old vintage and not so vintage tools in it, and what a strange eclectic collection it was. 

And while I was loitering there I heard a strange noise behind me… 

And then it was time to go. However I shall enthral you with my random pics.

   
   

And that was my day. Hope you enjoyed it too.

One final pic… because this is one of the things that Tewkesbury is known for:

© DRW 2017. Created 24/06/2017

Updated: 21/08/2017 — 12:22

James Hall Museum Of Transport

One of the better museums in Johannesburg is the James Hall  Museum of Transport in La Rochelle in Southern Johannesburg. It is the sort of place that is always worth visiting even if you have been there many times before. The museum was founded in 1964 by the late James “Jimmie” Hall and in conjunction with the Johannesburg City Council. The oldest motorcar on display is a 1900 Clement Panhard, but there are other items that are much older.

I have spent many hours there, meandering through the exhibits and I really enjoy seeing so many vehicles from my past. However, it is very difficult to present a balanced view of the museum because it has so many exhibits, and they are really a feast for the eyes. The museum consists of a number of exhibition spaces. Entry is at the doorway on the image above. This part of the museum does not really interest me because it is really about the days when the petrol engine was but a dream.

From this hall you move into the open courtyard area where many of the vehicles are stored or displayed. This is also where the majority of the traction engines are housed behind a fence. Many exhibits move around within the museum so some of my images show the exhibit where it was at the time and it may no longer be in that position at the time of writing or reading.

This is supposedly the largest collection of traction engine and steam powered vehicles in the country. However, I do not know how many of them can actually run. Many of the exhibits are related to transport in Johannesburg, so you will find the Christmas Bus, travelling Library and a number of ex-council vehicles in this space 

This is also where you can find the toilets and a small refreshment concession. The entrance to the next hall can be found in this courtyard and it leads into the hall where the majority of the exhibits are fire engines. 

This space leads into the blue tinted hall that houses the classic cars and motor cycles from many eras. It is a fascinating space and I remember many of those vehicles from my own childhood.

The door to the outside shed is to the right in this hall, and to the bus hall in the corner on the left of this image. The outside shed is where the agricultural machinery and steam engines are stored. I photographed the steam engines many years ago and their history may be found at old Steam Locomotives in South Africa (4 pages)

You get to the last exhibition space through the motor vehicle space and this hall is used to exhibit buses from various places in three lines. It also has the last tram that ran in Johannesburg. Unfortunately, the nature of the hall precludes effective photography because it is a very narrow space.

The exit to the museum is through this hall (image below)

 

That is the museum in a nutshell.  Do not take my word for it though, it is an awesome museum and well worth a visit. The museum does not charge for entry but a donation is always helpful, and always check the opening times so that you are not disappointed.

Many years ago the Transvaal Branch of the World Ship Society was given an area to exhibit nauticalia in when they held an open day. There are almost no aircraft or ship related exhibits. All the images in this post were taken at the museum over 4 different visits. 

© DRW 2017. 03/04/2017

Updated: 11/04/2017 — 06:56
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