musings while allatsea

Musings of a curious individual

Tag: Statue

Wallace and Gromit in Bristol

From July 2nd until September 2nd, 67 sculptures of Nick Park’s Academy Award®-winning characters Wallace, Gromit and Feathers McGraw were scheduled to hit the streets of Bristol and the surrounding area to raise money for Bristol Children’s Hospital. (The images are in the order that I found them)

Once again I ended up making detours to grab pics of the large statues that were often festooned with fans of the Aardman characters. The giant sculptures are designed by high-profile artists, designers, innovators and local talent. Unfortunately I will never get to photograph them all, but its worth showing what I did get (10 out of 67).

(5) Stellar. Designed by Laura Hallett (Park Street)

(6) Feathers McGraw. Painted by Emily Ketteringham (Wills Memorial Building)

(15) Wallace. Painted by Emily Ketteringham. (The Cenotaph in Magpie Park)

(16) Fangs McGraw. Painted by Ruth Broadway (Stanfords, Corn Str)

(17). Long John Wallace. Cascade Steps, Painted by Elaine Carr

(18) Prima Featherina. Painted by Ruth Broadway. (Bristol Royal Marriott Hotel)

(19) Gnome Sweet Gnome. Painted by Katie Wallis (College Green)

(20) The Wallace Collection. Painted by Rachel Bennett (Anchor Road)

(21) A Grand Tribute. Designed by Nick Park (Millennium Square)

(22) Oceans 1: Deep Blue. Designed by the Faculty of Engineering at University of Bristol (We the Curious)

(23) Feathertron 3000 Designed by JamFactory X Jimmy 2 Eggs (Bristol Energy Hub)

(24) Honeydew. Designed by the Yogscast (Narrow Quay)

(25) Bristol’s Own. Designed by Susan Webber (Queens Square)

(26) Bristol in Bloom. Designed by Ella Masters. (St Mary Redcliffe)

(28) Gromitronic. Designed by Renishaw (M Shed)

(29) Alex the Lion. Designed by DreamWorks (Museum Square, M Shed)

(30) Space Oddi-tea. Designed by Cary’s Ink. (Wapping Wharf)

(31) Wallambard. Designed by Tim Miness. (SS Great Britain)

(37) Fromage McGraw. Designed by Peter Lord. (Quakers Friars)

(39) Boss. Designed by Wes Anderson (Showcase Cinema de Lux)

(40) Tropi-Canis. Designed by Maria Burns (House of Fraser)

(41) One in a minion. Designed by Illumination (Bristol Marriott City Centre)

(43) Gromit , designed by Nick Park. Location: Temple Quay

(44) Game of Cones. Painted by Rachel Bennett (Bristol Temple Meads Station)

There were two more sculptures that were mobile and more difficult to see, one was on a bus and the other on one of the ferries which I was fortunate enough to photograph when I arrived.

In 2015, while visiting the Clifton Suspension Bridge, I spotted some Shaun The Sheep statues, and they too were on the fund raising trail for the Bristol Children’s Hospital Charity. There were 120 of these statues and they were auctioned off for the charity. 

A Sheep’s Eye View. Clifton Observatory

Isambaard (Clifton Suspension Bridge)

Wallace and Gromit, Shaun the Sheep are the work of Nick Park and Aardman Animation. 

DRW © 2018 – 2019. Created 23/07/2018. More images added 04/08/2018

Updated: 04/01/2019 — 06:55

Loving Liverpool (3) Museum of the Moon

In which we go looking for Abercromby Square.

Having checked into my hotel and showered I still had some time to kill as the sun was still high and bedtime was nowhere close. Marked on my navigation was “Abercromby Square” which sounds kind of obscure but there was a reason for my interest. 

Liverpool was home to members of the Chavasse family, the most famous of whom was Captain Noel Godfrey Chavasse. VC*, MC. while his father was the second Bishop of Liverpool. I was keen to find the place because there was a statue of him in the square. It was more like a pilgrimage though, and one of the many reasons I was visiting this city originally. Unfortunately my street map did not show the square, but I knew it was close to the Catholic Cathedral so technically should not be too difficult to find as long as I went up the right street in the first place. Unfortunately I did not and while I could see the cathedral I could not work out where the park was on the ground in relation to it.

Catholic Cathedral

My mapping app did not work either because it would never refresh and if you tried to refresh it manually all you would end up was a “mapping app has stopped functioning” error. Bah humbug! I decided that my best course was to try the roads at the front of the cathedral (this is the back) and see what happens. Fortunately a kind hearted soul took pity on me and pointed down the road to a green area 3 blocks away. Huzzah! the destination was in sight. 

Abercromby Square

The statue was not in the square but on the pavement next to it, and it was such a moment to see that statue. 

The statue was engraved:

“Liverpool Heroes.
This scuplture commemorates the life and death of captain Noel Godfrey Chavasse
VC and Bar, MC, RAMC. Medical officer to the 10th battalion (Liverpool Scottish)
King’s Liverpool Regiment, and fifteen other recipients of the Victoria Cross who were
born in Liverpool and whose names appear around the base

Captain Chavasse, son of the second Bishop of Liverpool, was the only man to be
awarded two Victoria Crosses during World War I, and died on 4th August 1917 of
wounds received in Flanders

Several of the other’s also made the supreme sacrifice. May this memorial remind
us all of the debt we owe to such men.

“Greater love hath no man than this
that a man lay down his life for his friends”

The names around the base are:


The sculptor is Tom Murphy of Liverpool

It was time to move on. The Catholic Cathedral was closed so I started to head towards the direction of town. Unfortunately for me, the Anglican Cathedral loomed close by at the end of a street. It just seemed so close. 

The sun was still shining and I had some time to kill so I thought I would head down in that direction and have a quick recce before returning the next day. There were really two spaces I wanted to visit at what is known as “St James Mount”:- the first was the actual cathedral, and the second was a cemetery known as St James Garden (aka St James Cemetery). Situated behind the cathedral it was created below ground level in a former quarry that was in use till 1825, and until 1936 was used as the Liverpool city cemetery and contrary to what you would think, the cemetery is not associated with the cathedral. It is a very beautiful place and I was very glad that I saw it in the evening light.

I went in through the gate by the Oratory, which is  the former mortuary chapel of the cemetery. It was designed in 1829 in classic Greek architecture by John Foster Jnr, as a re-creation of a Greek temple. 

The Oratory

It was all downhill from here…

Once flat ground was reached I was in a quiet park, dotted with headstones, flowers, pathways, mausoleums and trees. People were sitting around and enjoying the coolness of the air, others were walking their dogs or just strolling. It was hard to believe that you were actually in a cemetery that held close to 60 000 people. 

The domed cupola in the last image is the Huskisson Monument, it was designed to house the statue of William Huskisson who holds the distinction of being the world’s first reported railway passenger casualty; when he was run over and fatally injured by George Stephenson’s pioneering locomotive engine Rocket. The statue is no longer there, but the monument is.  A mineral spring also flows through this area (the Chalybeate) although I did not see it at the time.  From the flatness of the bottom of the quarry it was time to ascend. I was starting to tire and needed to make my way home so I followed the path upwards to the gate and to ground level. 

This was the back of the cathedral and even here people were enjoying the warm evening air. I really felt like staking a spot for myself but I still had a long walk ahead of me so resting was not an option at this point.

I walked past the huge building and it is a mighty, lofty, looming building. It is reportedly the largest Anglican Cathedral ever built. I came to the spot where I had entered the area and saw that the Cathedral was open so decided to pop in and have a quick look….

When I saw what was inside it my plans for heading back to the hotel went for a wobbly because there was an event going on in it called:

The Museum of the Moon.

Museum of the Moon is a new touring artwork by UK artist Luke Jerram. Measuring seven metres in diameter, and internally lit,  the moon features 120dpi detailed NASA imagery of the lunar surface. At an approximate scale of 1:500,000, each centimetre of the spherical sculpture represents 5km of the moon’s surface*. (https://my-moon.org/about/)

I kid you not, the moon was shining in the cathedral, and it was magnificent. Photographs do not do the work justice. 

It was one of those things that children would love and adults would be amazed by. Everywhere people were taking photographs and just staring. The huge cavernous interior of the cathedral just made it so much more impressive. It was like something out of the original “Despicable Me” movie. The coloured lights on the walls of the image above is caused by the sun shining through the stained glass windows of the cathedral. I am not covering the cathedral in this blogpost but will cover it on it’s own page, these images are all about the moon….​

And having stood in awe at the moon and the cathedral I shall now turn the page and cover the cathedral on the next page.

forwardbut

I headed off home after a quick walk around and spent a restless night trying to get to sleep. I was bushed, but the reality is that I had accomplished all that I wanted to see and do in half a day. The only thing left was the ferry trip across to Birkenhead and of course the cathedral.   

DRW © 2018. Created 03/05/2018

Updated: 14/06/2018 — 05:38

Photo Essay: The Navigators

In 2008 when I was in London one of the places I passed through was Hays Galleria, a re-imagined development that is on the site of the former Hay’s Wharf. 

It is not the sort of place that interests me, being filled with coffee shops and trendy boutiques and barrows selling souvenirs of London.

However, it is also home to a statue entitled “The Navigators” by David Kemp, that was erected in 1987. 

It is really reminiscent of something out of Monty Python and a steampunk vision of an early steamship. That is what draws me to Hays Galleria.

 

“Aah, it’s all very well, but what does it do?” I hear you ask.

Like most art it doesn’t do much, it just hangs around and looks decorative. Although it does actually move and spray water and is quite impressive when seen “under sail”.

It is wonderful quirky piece that appears to have been cleaned up since i saw it in 2013, although I do think it would have been even more impressive if it had “a part that goes “Parp” going “Parp” (Thanks Terry Pratchett). 

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 17/06/2016

Updated: 01/01/2018 — 16:09

Photo Essay: Paddington Bear

During my trip to London via Paddington Station, I was hoping to see Paddington Bear. Much to my surprise I actually I saw 3 of them.

The first is on Paddington Station: 

Paddington Bear

Paddington Bear

The information plaque reads: 

“The statue was designed by Marcus Cornish and is based on the illustrations of Paddington Bear by Peggy Fortnum. It acknowledges the enourmous pleasure which Michael Bond’s creation has given to millions of children and adults throughout the world since his first book was published in 1958.”

"Please look after this bear"

“Please look after this bear”

Judging by the shine on his nose he is a very well loved bear too.

On my last day in London I discovered two more Paddingtons, and they formed part of the Paddington Trail  that was was launched From 4 November until 30 December 2014. Fifty Paddington statues were placed around London close to museums, parks, shops and key landmarks to publicise the release of the CGI Paddington movie in 2014. Unfortunately I only saw two of them.

Paddington Station

This one was on Paddington Station

While this one I spotted in Norfolk Square Gardens close to the station.

I would have loved to have found more, but then I would have ended up running around like a mad person again. The last time I hunted down this sort of campaign was in 2013 in Southampton when they had the Rhino Campaign.

In 2017, while en route to South Africa I found the following on Paddington Station. I do not recall seeing it in 2017, so it may be a new addition.

Somewhere amongst my stuff I have a Paddington Plush that I bought in London in 2008, but at this moment in time he is probably out visiting, or scoffing marmalade under a tree. 

Found him…

And, in 2017 I found that there was a Padding Bear themed shop on Paddington Station, and inside it they had a very nice collection box too.

And, I had forgotten about the kiddy ride I saw in Weymouth in 2013.

I grew up reading the Paddington Bear books and I never thought that one day I would be standing in the very same station photographing a statue of a bear from Peru. 

Postscript.

Sadly Micheal Bond, creator of Paddington Bear, passed away in 2017. 

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 12/06/2016. Added new pic 26/02/2017, 25/03/2017

Updated: 01/01/2018 — 16:10

Photo Essay: The Albert Memorial in London

In 2013 I saw the Albert Memorial in Kensington Gardens in London, or rather I saw the scaffolding around the Albert Memorial. 

It was not a pretty sight. 

In June 2016 I had to cross Kensington Gardens en route to the V&A Museum and the scaffolding was gone and I finally had a chance to have a look. 

The Memorial was commissioned by Queen Victoria in memory of her husband, Prince Albert who died in 1861. The cost of the Memorial (£120,000) was met by public subscription and it was opened in July 1872.

Prince Albert took his seat in 1875.

It is an impressive structure, with marble tableaux representing Europe, Asia, Africa and America at each corner of the memorial, while higher up are further figures representing manufacture, commerce, agriculture and engineering. These tableaux could fill a blogpost all on their own.

Asia

Asia

Africa

Africa

Europe

Europe

America

America

manufactures

manufactures

Commerce

Commerce

All around the base of the memorial the Parnassus frieze depicts celebrated painters, poets sculptors, musicians and architects, reflecting Albert’s enthusiasm for the arts. There are 187 exquisitely carved figures in the frieze.

It is an incredibly ornate memorial, and in the context of its era it must have really been a firm favourite amongst those who had the leisure time to stroll around Kensington gardens. However, it is doubtful whether the average Londoner living in the East End would have ever been to see it. Their lives were much more precarious, although it is interesting to note that Prince Albert died of Typhoid, a disease that was spread by eating or drinking food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person.

The memorial is a very popular tourist site in London and there were crowds around it in the afternoon when I returned from the Science Museum. 

What is the attraction? 

I asked myself the same question, but then I find beauty in cemeteries and derelict places, so my tastes are slightly skewed. I am not in favour of memorials glorifying people, however, endowing a country with a museum like the Victoria and Albert is a much better legacy than a structure built to remember a Prince.  But, having said that, it is an impressive structure and a monument to the legacy of Queen Victoria who is still remembered all around England, and in many other parts of the globe.

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 26/06/2016

Updated: 01/01/2018 — 16:11

The Sleeping Children

I love Cathedrals and old churches, and usually make an effort to have a look at them whenever I am near one. The one attraction that always draws me are the wall memorials and of course the effigies. I have seen quite a few now, but there is one that really sticks in my mind.

Inside Lichfield Cathedral you will find “The Sleeping Children”; it is the memorial to Ellen-Jane and Marianne Robinson, who died in 1813 and 1814, and it is breathtakingly beautiful, and the history of it is even more tragic.

lichfield_cathedral106
 

In the history of the memorial they mention the Boothby Memorial, which is equally beautiful, and an inspiration for this one. There is an interesting article about Penelope Boothby at “Pigtails in Paint

The images of the Boothby Memorial below were taken by Laurence Manton at the Graveyard Detective, and are used with his permission.
boothby01

 
 

In 1826 the poet, William Lisle Bowles wrote a poem about the Sleeping Children sculpture:

Look at those sleeping children; softly tread,
Lest thou do mar their dream, and come not nigh
Till their fond mother, with a kiss, shall cry,
‘Tis morn, awake! awake! Ah! they are dead!
Yet folded in each other’s arms they lie,
So still—oh, look! so still and smilingly,
So breathing and so beautiful, they seem,
As if to die in youth were but to dream
Of spring and flowers! Of flowers? Yet nearer stand
There is a lily in one little hand,
Broken, but not faded yet,
As if its cup with tears were wet.
So sleeps that child, not faded, though in death,
And seeming still to hear her sister’s breath,
As when she first did lay her head to rest
Gently on that sister’s breast,
And kissed her ere she fell asleep!
The archangel’s trump alone shall wake that slumber deep.
Take up those flowers that fell
From the dead hand, and sigh a long farewell!
Your spirits rest in bliss!
Yet ere with parting prayers we say,
Farewell for ever to the insensate clay,
Poor maid, those pale lips we will kiss!
Ah! ’tis cold marble! Artist, who hast wrought
This work of nature, feeling, and of thought;
Thine, Chantrey, be the fame
That joins to immortality thy name.
For these sweet children that so sculptured rest
A sister’s head upon a sister’s breast
Age after age shall pass away,
Nor shall their beauty fade, their forms decay.
For here is no corruption; the cold worm
Can never prey upon that beauteous form:
This smile of death that fades not, shall engage
The deep affections of each distant age!
Mothers, till ruin the round world hath rent,
Shall gaze with tears upon the monument!
And fathers sigh, with half-suspended breath:
How sweetly sleep the innocent in death!
 

My own images of the Sleeping Children Memorial do not do it justice, unfortunately I did not get back to the cathedral to rectify the situation. However, if I do get back to that city one day, be rest assured I will visit Ellen-Jane and Marianne, two girls who have reached through the ages to touch so many that pause at their effigy. With thanks to Laurence Manton for the use if his images

© DRW 2015-2018. Images migrated 01/05/2016

Updated: 31/12/2017 — 16:32

Finding the Fallen: Prestbury, Cheltenham

The nice thing about moving to a new city is that there are new cemeteries to explore, and Cheltenham was no exception. They have a large cemetery very close to the city centre called Prestbury, and it was to this cemetery that I wended my way on the 18th of January.
 
There are 181 CWGC burials in the cemetery, as well as 28 Crematorium mentions, so I would have my work cut out for me if I wanted to grab most of the graves. Naturally I would be on the look out for the Angel population and of course anything that would grab my interest.
 
I had a feeling that the cemetery was a big one, it certainly looked like it on Google Earth, so I was not quite sure what I would find. The Lodge is just inside the main gate and it was now privately owned like so many other cemetery lodges. 
The map was interesting, because it showed the curves that were popular before the bean counters took over, and I suspected there was a mix of old and really old graves, with the more modern iterations moving away from the main gate.
  
The first military encounter I made was with the Gloucesters Memorial, and it is really a step back in time. The memorial comprising original crosses erected over the graves of men who were killed on the battle fields. Unfortunately the crosses were painted brown and that has really made them look less than historic. If anything they should have been varnished and left as they were originally. Most of the inscriptions are no longer legible either, which is really a pity.

And then we were off…. list clutched in my hands and shutter finger cocked. It was quite a warm day and the sun kept on coming and going which really messed with my photography. Just inside the gates is the Cross of Sacrifice, and the all crucial split that dictates how much of the cemetery you will get to see. I decided to head left because there was a CWGC grave on that side.
 . 
This was a Roman Catholic area, and it was in this area where I encountered the first angel statue. and it was the first of many. Prestbury has an impressive collection of oldies and new versions, and most were in a very good condition.
In fact that was one thing that impressed me about this cemetery, it was clean, well maintained, with very little sign of vandalism or neglect. Unfortunately though I did find that legibility on the headstones was not great, which was a pity because there were quite a few very impressive family stones.

 And then there is the chapel building….

I have seen a number of these in my travels, and I think the one at Prestbury outdoes them all. It is a spectacular building, in an excellent condition, and as beautiful as any church could be. Unfortunately I could not access the two chapels or the crematorium in it, but I spent quite a bit of time photographing the gargoyles and stonework of it.

 
I worked my way towards the back of the cemetery, crossing off names as I went. There was a small Australian plot close to the chapels and it did make walking the rows much easier.

But most of my graves were individuals scattered throughout and consequently I covered a lot of ground although I did not really concentrate too much on the thousands of graves all around me.

 
At some point I reached the boundary between 1950 and upwards, and it was unlikely that I would find any CWGC graves after that and started sweeping my way across the cemetery. It was really a pleasure to work this cem because I did not have to concentrate on not falling into a hole too much. The beauty of good maintenance is that my life was much easier.
  
My list was also shrinking and it was about time to find the cremations that were mentioned on the CWGC website. There were also three graves mentioned on the cemetery plans, but they were not historic in the way I would have liked. There are 5 VC graves in the cemetery, and I picked up the plaque for one of them,  although I was not specifically hunting for them. At some point I probably will, but this was not the day.
 
In fact I was starting to get tired, and home was looking more like an option. I started weaving my way towards the exit, although I really wanted to look at the Gardens of Remembrance before I left. 
  
It was a very pretty area, and I considered that if I pop my clogs one fine day this would be a suitable place to end up. Where do I sign? Unfortunately I did not find my missing crem plaque, but with hindsight I was looking in the wrong area. One more thing to do on a return visit. 
 
Behind the Gardens of Remembrance is the Ukranian Memorial
  
And that pretty much was the last image I took.  Unfortunately the 21 graves I am missing are probably PM’s so finding them is going to be very difficult, so I cannot completely mentally tick off this cemetery. One day I will be back.
And I am confident that the visit will be enjoyable because this is a very enjoyable cemetery to walk.

Update: 08/08/2015

Yesterday I revisited Prestbury to find the 5 Victoria Cross graves in the cemetery and clear some of the missing CWGC graves. I managed to find 13 more, and understand a bit more about how the cemetery is numbered, although I am still puzzled about where some of the graves are.

 
© DRW 2015-2018. Images migrated 01/05/2016
Updated: 31/12/2017 — 16:33

Someone is watching you.

Southampton, like many old cities in the UK has retained a portion of their former city walls, although making sense of them is quite difficult considering how the city has changed over the years. One of my favourite discoveries amongst these remnants is a statue that leans over the walls, watching what goes on beneath…

azura 108

The statue is of John Le Fleming, former Mayor of Southampton from 1295 till 1336, and I suspect he may be looking with distaste at the consumerism that happens at the nearby shopping mall.

Continuing with this portion of the walls you would come to the Bargate which served in  variety of roles during it’s existence. 

Alas, the Southampton that John Le Fleming looked over was very different to what it is now, even the shore has moved much further away and a large portion has been reclaimed and made into what is known as the Western Docks. 

So next time you come out of West Quay laden with parcels with designer labels, remember that somebody is watching you from the walls and is probably not impressed.

© DRW 2013-2018. Created retrospectively 03/05/2016

Updated: 29/12/2017 — 07:57

Photo Essay: Dick Whittington and His Cat

Now when I was a wee lad in school, they told us a story about Dick Whittington’s Cat. I seem to vaguely remember that he became the Lord Mayor Of London (Dick Whittington, not the cat). Naturally old age has made me forget the whole story and frankly I do not recall it even after reading about it on Wikipedia.  

So why am I raising the subject? On the way to Highgate Cemetery from Archway Tube Station there is a long hill (appropriately called “Highgate Hill”) to climb, and at Google Earth co-ordinates  51° 33.993’N,   0° 8.211’W  you will find Dick Whittington’s Cat, or a reasonable facsimile thereof. 

I have to admit I was puzzled when I first saw it, but then the grey matter kicked in (briefly). 

The only real markings on the statue that I saw was a plaque,

and the stone that the cat is on has a worn engraving that I could not get a clear photograph of but which identifies this as the Whittington Stone.

Apparently, the Whittington Stone marks the spot where Dick Whittington is said to have heard the Bow Bells prophesying his good fortune: “Turn again Whittington, thrice Lord Mayor of London!”.  In fact there is a whole conflab about this humble moggy and the stone he is sitting on,  All I remember was Highgate Hill stretching endlessly in front of me. 

Out of curiosity, the Bow Bells are those of St Mary-Le-Bow near St Paul’s Cathedral, although whether you could hear them 6,5 kilometres away is debatable. According to tradition a true Cockney must be born within earshot of the sound of Bow Bells. Family lore says that my Grandmother was born in earshot of the bells (only 750 metres away).  

Actually I preferred the moggy I saw in Highgate Cemetery, he was much nicer looking anyway. Meow.

© DRW 2013-2018. Retrospectively created 15/06/2016 

Updated: 28/12/2017 — 07:15

Animals in War Memorial

Occasionally you discover a memorial, grave or monument that touches you deeply, and I have had quite a few of them, but the memorial I saw on the 7th of February may just have outshone them all. 
When you walk towards Marble Arch in London with Hyde Park on your left, you will come to the memorial dedicated to “Animals in War”. It is a truly magnificent piece of work by designer David Backhouse, and it was carved by Richard Holliday and Harry Gray, and built by Sir Robert McAlpine LTD. The memorial is located at Google Earth Co-ordinate  51.511016°  -0.157499°. 
On the day I visited it was a cold, wet and dull day. And many of the animals that served so faithfully during so many wars probably would have experienced days that were much worse than this. 
 
The memorial takes the form of a broken arc, with two heavily laden mules walking towards a vertical break in the arc. On the other side a horse and a dog walk towards the gardens beyond.
 
The dog is looking over his shoulder, and has an extremely expressive face, his head and nose shiney from the many people who pause and rub his head. He is a well loved figure. 
 
It is an extremely powerful work, and left me teary eyed. I just wanted to stay there and photograph and absorb its aura. 
 
All to often we forget that in the midst of the human carnage of warfare thre is often a massive loss of life amongst the animals that were used as porterage, weaponry, transportation and support. I don’t think that there are any numbers of how many animals lost their lives on the battlefields. As is so eloquently stated “Many and various animals were employed to support British and Allied forces in wars and campaigns over the centuries and as a result millions died. From the pigeon to the elephant they all played a vital role in every region of the world in the cause of human freedom. Their contribution must never be forgotten.”
marble 108
 
 
I must return here one day, to see this in the sunlight, and to rub that nose and look at that long suffering mule. And again I will feel teary because even while I write Rhino are loosing their battle back in South Africa. And I suspect one day we may have to erect a memorial like this so show the world that mankind is very capable of making a species extinct even during peacetime.
 
Postscript.
I did manage a return trip but somehow the pics I took did not have the same feel as the ones above.
 

 

 

© DRW 2013-2018. Images recreated 26/03/2016

Updated: 26/12/2017 — 15:57
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