musings while allatsea

Musings of a curious individual

St Mary Magdalene Twyning.

With Winter on the go I have not been making too many excursions lately, I also have the added complication of back problems and a camera that seems to be on its last legs. However, this morning I departed on my way to a church called St Mary Magdalene near a small village called Twyning, I had originally planned to do this trip last week, but the weather had defeated me. Come to think of it, it was not such great weather today either. As the crow flies the church is roughly 2,75 km away, but on foot is is more like 4.5 km, Google Earth Co-ordinates are: 52° 1.386’N, 2° 9.384’W. There are six casualties listed as being buried here

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My route took right at the roundabout, over St John’s Bridge in Tewkesbury, towards the Mythe Bridge; however, instead of turning left towards the bridge I carried on and followed the road. It is a killer of a hill!

After much huffing and puffing I made it to the top and followed the road all the way, pausing to admire this wonderful building which reminds me of a Victorian water tower. It is very out of place but what a beaut it is.

It appears as if people do live in it, but there is no indication of its history. A bit further on I came to “The Crows”. I was tempted to throw a stone at at. and not too far from here was my turning towards “Church End” where my destination was waiting. A short 1/4 mile later and I was at the church of St Mary Magdalene.

Like so many parish churches in the UK it is steeped in history and there has probably been a church on this site since 1100 although I suspect that portions of the building that I saw today may date from the 1800’s. Certainly there are graves from the 1600’s and 1700’s in the churchyard, and an effigy in the church dates from the 1500’s. The graveyard is quite a large one, and has some really beautiful headstones, although the legibility of some is poor, The headstone above dates from the 1760’s as does the stone below. The headstones are beautiful, it was a really pleasant surprise to see so many from the 1700’s all in one place.

This beaut is a relatively new stone, dating from 1937, and it is the first that I have ever seen like this, whether there is any significance to the design I do not know, but looking at it now it reminds me of a record holder. The headstone below dates from 1772.

Once I had found my 6 CWGC graves I ambled over to the church. The service had just ended and I really wanted to check if there were any war memorials inside the church. I was pleasantly surprised by the welcome I received even though I was intruding on a coffee morning. The next service was due to start at 11 am, so I had very little time to photograph. The war memorial to the men from the parish is a modest one, but I could not help thinking that when they erected the original they did not expect that a second plaque would need to be added over 25 years later. It is a pretty church, with simple lines and a tranquil beauty about it. The pulpit is spectacular, although I did struggle to find a clear space to photograph it from. There is also a wonderful Victorian organ that must really be fantastic to hear in this small space. The biggest surprise was the wonderful effigy tomb of Sybil and Anne Clare who both died on 13 February 1575 “after the birth of the baby” The inscription plaque has been transcribed, and makes for interesting reading. And of course the stained glass is magnificent And then it was time to leave as the preparations for the next service were well advanced.

The challenge for parish churches like this is: how to attract and grow a congregation, and part of it is to make your church welcoming, and to embrace technology. The days of dark formal churches has ended, and you either adapt or die. This church has adapted.

A last look at some of those old headstones and I was on my way, and an hours walk home.

All in all it was a good morning, the churchyard exceeded my expectations, and it was nice to see inside the church too. Based on what little I do know, I do expect that the ground I was walking on had many more layers of bodies buried beneath it than visible headstones above it,

A church like this has seen so much history, and so has the small village around it. We cannot begin to fathom what life was like in the 1600’s in this area.

I feel sorry for the horses that may have had to climb that hill, although it is probable that there was a fair amount of barge traffic. The river is not too far from the village, but today I could not hop a boat to take me to it. That concluded my expedition for the day. I do however have to conclude that my camera is on its last legs, and so is one set of batteries. At some point I need to replace them both. I look forward to a new seasons expeditions, but for today I was well chuffed.

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