musings while allatsea

Musings of a curious individual

No milk today

When I was young (last century some time ago) fresh milk or orange juice was delivered in bottles to our houses.  You left your empty bottle on the gatepost or at your door with coupons inside it and voilà, a milk float or truck would come along and exchange it for a new bottle. The milk would have a layer of cream on it it and the juice was not made with apples! Our local dairy was NCD (National Co-Operative Dairies?) and their HQ was somewhere near where we lived. 

Like everything else the prices kept on rising’ forcing people to buy less milk which meant less profits which meant higher prices ad nauseum. At some point milk deliveries stopped and we then started to buy our milk at the supermarket, although when we lived in one area there used to be a depot where you could buy milk too. 

When I arrived in the UK in 2013 I was surprised to see that you could get milk delivered in bottles to where you lived, although it does not seem to be in all cities. Which is what brings me to the real object of this post which is: milk floats. These strange electric vehicles are quite rare nowadays but you do see them occasionally, and of course being electric you do not hear them coming although the rattle of milk bottles is a dead give-away. 

Where I live is a dairy, and they operated milk floats for a number of years, and in 2018 they had two of them on display at the Tewkesbury Classic Vehicle Festival.

I have never seen the bottom one around town so I don’t know whether it is in service or not, after all, like so many others I get my milk at the local supermarket, although it must have been quite a surprise to have something like the bike below on the milk run.

Unfortunately the milk float is quite a rare beastie, and they were probably amongst the more common electric vehicles around way back then, although the float probably carried its own weight in batteries and I doubt whether the mileage was very high, but given the stop-start nature of its service they probably made more sense than a conventional petrol or diesel engined vehicle.

Where did they all go to? there is a scrap one up the road from where I stay, and it has never been in a position where I could get a decent pic of it, until recently.



I cannot put a date to when this float was in service, but you can bet it was a long time ago. I hope that they restore this oldie and put it in a museum; after all these are almost extinct, just like the glass milk bottle and the fresh orange juice of my childhood.

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