Category: Worcestershire

Oh great! it’s Great Malvern (2)

Continuing where we left off…

The War Memorial is directly in front of the library and has no names inscribed on it. It is described as:

WINGED SEMI-NUDE MALE FIGURE, REPRESENTING YOUTH, WITH ARMS STRETCHED UPWARDS HOLDING A FLAMING TORCH. THE FIGURE LOOKS UPWARDS TOWARDS THE TORCH. TREE ROOTS ARE WRAPPED AROUND THE FEET OF THE FIGURE, WHICH STANDS ON A STONE PLINTH AND FIVE STEPPED BASE. THE INSCRIPTION IS CARVED PROUD ON THE PLINTH.”

The inscriptions read:

12 O’Clock:  “TO THOSE WHO/ NOBLY SERVED/ 1914-1919/ 1939-1945

6 O’Clock: “THEIR LIFE THEY/ GAVE THE LIGHT/ OF LIFE TO SAVE

The memorial is a Grade II listed structure and it was unveiled in 1923 and was made by Captain Richard Reginald Goulden. (Information from Imperial War Museum War Memorials Register).

The rent was paid and it was time to head for the Priory, and I covered that in a separate post which you can find by following the arrow.

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Suffice to say the Priory looks like this….

By the time I was finished at the Priory it was 11H45 and I needed to head for the station if I was going to get my 12H40 train. I had pencilled the cemetery into my itinerary and doubted that I had enough time to do it as well.  Walking back to the station I passed the Malvern Theatres

And  photographed the very impressive Malvern Hills District Council building.

Then it was time to hit the station, although I did detour to photograph Christ Church Malvern.

The railway came to Malvern in 1860 and Great Malvern’s Station was completed in 1863. It was built from Malvern Stone by the architect Edward W. Elmslie.  The interior decoration and the columns was by William Forsyth. Unfortunately it is impossible to get a decent image of the station exterior because of its length and the position of trees and the sun. The interior is amazing though. The steelwork is wonderful and its almost wasted on a station. 

Platform 1

Platform 2 with the train to Hereford

It was a very pretty station inside with an almost holiday-like feeling about it.  

On the way back to Worcester I was able to grab a snap of the River Severn from the train, I had never seen that view before. 

I was back in Evesham by 13H20 and back home an hour later. It had been a long day that stretched from 06H00 till the completion of this post. Great Malvern was a very pretty place and some of the houses were stunning. It is however quite crowded as it has narrow streets and pavements and it is uphill too! If you don’t know how to use a handbrake you will not be able to survive there.  

Great Malvern was in the bag, and it was great!

Random Images

Malvern Hills from the train after passing Malvern Link Station (1024×342)

DRW © 2019. Created 13/09/2019

Updated: 16/09/2019 — 05:19

Overbury and out

In October 2018 I visited the village of Overbury as part of my village tour. I had really stopped there to photograph the War Memorial; however the legibility of the memorial is poor due to wear on the stone plaques and base. I did notice a newish screenwall structure in the churchyard, and on a trip through to Evesham saw a stone mason at work on the wall. Could it be they were reproducing the war memorial names onto the screenwall? There was only one way to find out and that was to head out and see for myself. I had to leave enough time for the work to be completed though and as a result I only tackled this visit in 2019.

The image above shows the lychgate of St Faith’s, Overbury. The central plinth has the plaques on either side of it.  The new structure is shown below.

Unfortunately my supposition was wrong and it does not have the Roll of Honour on it, but a list of names of those who may be buried here or who were cremated, with their ashes interred at this spot. There went my theory down the pipes.  I now had anything of up to an hour to spend while waiting for my bus onwards to Evesham. The next hamlet on the road is Conderton, but it is too far to walk to and look around in such a short space of time so I remained in Overbury. I had photographed quite a bit of it in 2018, so I really wanted to add to those images. 

St Faith’s, Overbury

Behind St Faith’s is Overbury Court, a Georgian house dating from 1740. It is privately owned so I did not try for a photograph of it. The gate is in the lane next to the church.

There were too many comings and goings in the lane so I did not even attempt a peek through the railings. But the house has extensive gardens and it is a very picturesque area. You can see part of the roof of the house in the image below.

Heading back towards the bus shelter, I looked left and right and didn’t cross the street.

Looking right (towards Kemerton/Bredon)

You may think that these rural roads are quiet but it was a regular hustle and bustle which was made worse by the narrow roads, parked vehicles, the occasional tractor, horses and delivery vans.

The bus shelter (route towards Tewkesbury)

Possibly the village hall. The window is inscribed “Erected by Robert Martin in the year 1896”

I walked for awhile, enjoying the countryside and the horses having an early breakfast. 

(1500 x 506)

There was also the village cricket pitch for those who have 5 days to spare.

Cricket pitch pavilion

(1500 x 501) The cricket pitch

Dare I say “Howzat?”

This is the road looking back towards Overbury, the building on the left is a pub and the building on the right may have once been a tollgate/booth given how the window impinges onto the road. 

The road to Conderton

(1500 x 533)

Overbury Church Of England First School

The village shop and post office

My mission was accomplished. Had I planned it slightly better I probably would have been able to visit Conderton too, but my planning was not great and I had limited time available to get a bus. I wanted to visit Evesham after this so really had to get on the road. Look, there is my bus, I must go… 

DRW © 2019. Created 30/04/2019

Updated: 04/05/2019 — 08:09
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