Category: Transportation

Past Pics

Once upon a time (and I am talking last century here), cameras could not produce colour images, or should I say that photography was a monochrome activity. Like so many others of my generation I have a whole stack of images of family members who are no longer with us, and all of these images are in black and white. I have to admit I have a soft spot for mono images, they can be extremely atmospheric and their quality seemingly does not deteriorate as quickly as a colour print. Ship photographs in black and white are not as rare as you would think, and even in the time when colour photography was normal a lot of professional and press photography was in black and white. Over the years I have picked up some odds and sods and I want to put them up here for posterity. At some point Google will spider this page and they will become a part of the internet and hopefully survive long after I have popped my clogs.

Royal Navy.

I somehow acquired some images of the Royal Navy in Malta, and particularly prominent were 2 images of HMS Courageous.  She was sunk by U29 on 17 February 1939 with the loss of 519 of her crew. Originally built as a the lead ship of  Courageous-class cruisers she participated in the Second Battle of Heligoland Bight in November 1917 and after the war was converted into an aircraft carrier between June 1924 and February 1928. How do I know it is Courageous? It was written on the back of the pic. 

HMS Courageous

HMS Rodney and HMS Courageous

 

The fleet is in. This image shows elements of the Royal Navy supposedly in Grand Harbour, Malta. It may also be back to front. Unfortunately I cannot ID any of the vessels. 

The image below is part of a Christmas card that was amongst the collection. The Spithead Review of 1953 was a large one, and our RFA was in “Line H”. A number of the ships names are familiar to me, but notables are: Amerigo Vespucci, Pretoria Castle, HMS Eagle, HMS Ark Royal, HMS Vanguard, Andes, THV Patricia, HMS Sheffield, HMS Maidstone, RMS Mauretania, etc. There is a nice pdf at http://cloudobservers.co.uk/ that shows the ships names and layout of the fleet. 

Quite by accident I have an old Illustrated London News from 1953 that has a section on the Coronation Review of 1953, and there is an image of part of the fleet with the RMS Mauretania steaming between the columns en route for Southampton.  (Image is 1500 x 675 px)  

Not all of the images that I got were from the Navy, a number featured passenger ships too. It is either the Armadale or Kenilworth Castle. 

This is either Winchester or Carnarvon Castle as built, or possibly Warwick Castle. Unfortunately the image did not have a name written on the back.

Two more unidentified Union-Castle ships in Southampton.

The same collection had the following two images:

3 funnel ship in floating dock. Possibly RMS Majestic in Southampton? Unfortunately the image is damaged and  I will see whether I can restore parts of it.

RMS Aquitania in New York.  Unfortunately I am unable to find a larger version of this image in my files.

Many years ago I was given this image of the Queen Elizabeth in Cape Town during the 2nd World War. I was never able to scan it one piece because it was wider than the scanner was which is why it has a definite “join” in the image. 

I was also given this image that they said was of HMS Vanguard, however Vanguard had a transom stern and she clearly does not, It is actually HMS Howe (you can read the name on the ship if you look close enough).

And another that I was given: MV Diplomat. 

I also managed to scrounge some ship images that were taken in Cape Town, the physical images themselves are roughly 50 x 50 mm and they scanned quite well but within the limits of the originals.  They were also scratched and battered, but are better than nothing. I will try clean them up as best I can. (images open are 800×600)

Pendennis Castle

Windsor Castle

Randfontein

City of Exeter

Maasdam or Ryndam

Hamburg

Angelina Lauro

SA Trader,  Transporter or  Pioneer

SA Shipper, ex Clan Robertson.

Simonskerk

Unidentified (Harrisons Line?)

Unidentified Lykes Lines

Mormacsea

Patris Ex Bloemfontein Castle

Arundel or Windsor Castle

Unknown Mitsui OSK ship

   
   

DRW © 2020. Recreated 30/05/2020. Unfortunately I am unable to credit the images to anybody as I do not know the names of the original photographers, however I would like to thank them for recording this slice of shipping history. Special thanks to Ken Malcom for his ID’s of some of the ships.


And now: The Shipping Forecast

Many years ago I read a book called “And Now the Shipping Forecast” By Peter Jefferson and it was kinda of strange because it was really about the weather at sea in areas around the British Isles. It made for somewhat odd reading because there was no relevance to me or where I lived at the time, although I was interested in the shipping part of it. I put the book out of my mind until I was reminded of it while reading another book and decided that I must relook the Shipping Forecast. 

The British Isles are surrounded by seas and ocean so the weather on land is affected by what happens over water and the adjacent continents, and being a maritime nation it is important that the weather forecast is correct (or as close as one can get with the weather). The first warning services for shipping were “broadcast” in February 1861 via telegraph communications.  In 1911, the Met Office began issuing marine weather forecasts which included gale and storm warnings via radio transmission for areas around Great Britain and it has been going ever since. It is produced by the Met Office and broadcast by BBC Radio 4 on behalf of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. 

The seas around Britain are divided into 31 areas, and are named in a roughly clockwise direction starting with Viking and ending with Southern Iceland. The coastal weather stations named in the Shipping Forecast are numbered on the map below.

Image license:  Emoscopes, UK shipping forecast zones, CC BY-SA 3.0  Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shipping_Forecast. Image has been cropped and resized. 

By some strange quirk the service gained a regular following both on land and at sea and regular listeners are convinced that the report helps them get to sleep, and realistically it is not the sort of broadcast that would make you sit up and reach for your shotgun under the bed. However, the weather forecast is very important if you are sailing a small boat or navigating a container ship, although modern vessels have much better sources of weather information available to them. 

What does it sound like? 

Announcer:

And now, here is the shipping forecast.

There are warnings of gales in Viking, North Utsire, South Utsire, Forties, Cromarty, German Bight and Humber.

The general synopsis: Low, Rockall, 9 7 3 moving northwards, losing its identity by same time. New low expected Malin by that time. Low, Hebrides 9 9 4, moving rapidly South-East, and losing its identity by midday tomorrow.

The area forecasts for the next 24 hours: Viking, North Utsire, South Utsire – Gale warning issued Oh, nine four two. South-Easterly gale force 8 increasing severe gale force 9 later; wind South-Easterly 6 to 8, occasionally severe gale 9; sea state rough or very rough, becoming very rough or high; rain later; visibility moderate or good

Forties, Cromarty—Gale warning issued Oh, nine four two. Severe gale force 9 veering North-Westerly and decreasing gale force 8–imminent. Wind South-East 5 to 7, occasionally gale 8; sea state moderate or rough; rain later and squally showers; visibility moderate or good, occasionally poor later.

Forth, Tyne, Dogger, Fisher —Variable, becoming cyclonic, 3 or 4; but Easterly or South-Easterly 5 or 6 in North and East.Rain then showers. Moderate or good.

German Bight and Humber —Gale warning. South-Easterly severe gale force 9 decreasing gale force 8, imminent; wind South-East 6 to gale 8, occasionally severe gale 9 veering South-West 6 later; sea state moderate or rough; rain or thundery showers; visibility moderate or good, occasion-ally poor.

Thames, Dover, Portland and Plymouth—variable 4 or 5; but Northerly or North-Easterly 6 or 7, occasional gale in South backing North-Westerly later. Intermittent wintery showers. Visibility moderate or good becoming poor later.

Fitzroy and Sole—severe gale force 9 veering Westerly and decreasing force 7 later. Sea state rough. Thundery showers, visibility moderate or good. Lundy, Fastnet, Irish Sea,Shannon, Rockall, Malin, Hebrides, Bailey—West or North-West, 4 or 5, increasing 6 at times in Irish Sea. Showers. Moderate or good.

Fair Isle, Faeroes—West or North West backing South or South-West, 5 or 6, decreasing 3 at times. Rain or drizzle later. Moderate or good.

And, South-East Iceland—Northerly or North-Easterly 4 or 5 increasing 6 to gale 8 for a time. Wintery showers, good, occasionally poor.

And that completes the shipping forecast.

(Retrieved from https://studylib.net/doc/7879599/script-for-shipping-forecast-by-adrian-plass) by Adrian Plass © 2012

You may also want to listen to 5 hours of the Shipping Forecast on youtube

Having heard the forecast on youtube I am now almost ready to hear it live seeing as I have a problem sleeping, although it would not be complete gobbledegook to me as I do have an interest in shipping and know where some of those areas are. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) I do not live next to the seaside although the Severn Estuary would come under Lundy.  (02/05/2020: Wind: Variable 3 or 4, becoming cyclonic 3 to 5. Sea states: Slight or moderate. Weather: Occasional rain and fog patches developing. Visiblity: Moderate or good, occasionally very poor. ).

According to Wikipedia there are normally four broadcasts per day at the following (UK local) times:

  • 0048 – transmitted on FM and LW. Includes weather reports from an extended list of coastal stations at 0052 and an inshore waters forecast at 0055 and concludes with a brief UK weather outlook for the coming day. The broadcast finishes at approximately 0058.
  • 0520 – transmitted on FM and LW. Includes weather reports from coastal stations at 0525, and an inshore waters forecast at 0527.
  • 1201 – normally transmitted on LW only.
  • 1754 – transmitted only on LW on weekdays, as an opt-out from the PM programme, but at weekends transmitted on both FM and LW.

On 30th March 2020, as a result of emergency rescheduling due to the Covid-19 outbreak, the number of bulletins a day was reduced to three as follows:

  • 0048 – transmitted on FM and LW
  • 0533 – transmitted on FM and LW
  • 1203 (weekdays only) – transmitted on FM and LW
  • 1754 (weekends only) – transmitted on FM and LW

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) sea state code largely adopts the ‘wind sea’ definition of the Douglas Sea Scale.

Many links were used in this article, and they provide much more information than I can. I do recommend the following as well as the links in the above article:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_state

https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/the-shipping-forecast/

http://www.openculture.com/2014/06/stephen-fry-reads-the-legendary-british-shipping-forecast.html

https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/specialist-forecasts/coast-and-sea/shipping-forecast

DRW © 2020. Created 02/05/2020


Remembering the Dorita

Many years ago the Transvaal Branch of the World Ship Society went on one of its periodic trips down to Durban. For some reason I was not with them but when they came back they told me about a small private yacht that they had had a visit to. The ship had supposedly been owned by Elvis and the Richard Burton/Elizabeth Taylor pairing at some point. The next time I went down to Durban I spotted the vessel and took pics of her, but did not really pay too much attention. If only I knew what a historic ship she was back then.

I recently posted her pic on one of my shipping groups and drew a blank so I decided to go see what was available in the outside world. The biggest problem I had was her name. For some odd reason I had labelled the image “Doreeta” but her name was really “Dorita”. Incidentally, the image above shows the former pilot boat R.A. Leigh in the background with the blue and orange funnel.

I discovered that the Dorita was now called “Grey Mist” and looked a bit different to what she looked like back then when we saw her. Her current specs are:  38.71m with a top speed of 13 knots from a pair of 425.0 hp engines. She has accommodation date up to 14 people with a crew of 5. She was designed by Charles E. Nicholson and built by Camper & Nicholsons in Gosport with delivery in 1920 with the name Grey Mist for H.N. Anderson. In 1926 she was purchased by Sir John Archer K.B.E but resold to Harry Vincent in 1934. In 1939 she was bought by Lady Maud Burton and her husband Ronald Rothbury Burton. When war broke out she was requisitioned by the Royal Navy and participated in the Dunkirk Evacuation which makes her one of the few survivors from that episode in history. She later served as a “signal ship” throughout the war. She was returned to her owners after the war.  

She was then bought by Walter Mears in 1951 who restored and operated her as a charter yacht around the Greek Islands. She was resold to Albert Bachelor who took her out of the British Registry, and later re-named her Marina II in 1966. She then drops out of sight until she was discovered rotting away in Durban in 1993 under the name Dorita. She was purchased by Fort Worth businessman Holt Hickman and crossed the Atlantic to America in 1998.   (https://www.berwickcameraclub.co.uk/news/tuesday-24th-september)

She was berthed at Galveston in 1998 and her new owner began a complete refit of the yacht in 2003, which was completed in 2011. (https://www.coastmonthly.com/2015/01/grey-mist/)

I could not find any reference to Elvis or Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton although part of her history is missing. At some point she must have been re-engined although it appears as if she was originally diesel powered which was quite rare in period when she was built. Fortunately she still retains her counter stern. 

There is a complete description of her at (https://www.superyachttimes.com/yachts/grey-mist) as well as an image.  There are two images of her at Shipspotting.com. Use the thumbnails to access the pages. 

© dirk septer

© stuurmann

The Dorita is remembered but it is such a pity that she has become so divorced from her history and her past but she has existed for a century and is a unique glimpse into the lifestyle of the rich and famous. 

DRW 2020. Created 27/04/2020. Special thanks to the owners of the weblinks that I have used in this bit of history.