musings while allatsea

Musings of a curious individual

Category: Photo Essay

Cool sighting of the day

Occasionally we vintage cars passing through town and sometimes they stop so I can get a pic (or 3). Today I spotted what turned out to be a Stoneleigh Chummy 4 Season from 1924.

It is not the first time I have seen this particular vehicle, but the first time I have managed to get pics of it.

There is not a lot about these vehicles out there, and at the moment all I can really say is that Stoneleigh was made by Armstrong Siddeley. Hopefully at some point I will find more info. They certainly do not make them like that anymore. 

Special thanks to the owner of this rare beauty, thanks for preserving her for us to enjoy so many years after she was built. 

DRW © 2019. Created 19/05/2019

Updated: 19/05/2019 — 14:57

Armour in the Abbey

The “Armour” referred to in this post is not of the tracked vehicle type, but rather it is about men with swords, helmets and armour, (not too be confused with the Knights who say Ni!). This is the first time I have heard of the event but it is possible that it was held on previous years but I never went to it. At any rate, more information may be had at http://www.tewkesburymedievaltown.uk/tewkesbury-armour-in-the-abbey/index.htm.

I went on the first day of the event (Sunday) but it is also open tomorrow on the bank holiday and I expect it will be much busier then. Every year Tewkesbury holds a Medieval Festival so I have seen some of this stuff before, but it is always nice to go out and see the people who really put so much into events like this. Unfortunately there was not much to see, but it was interesting nevertheless.  The event was held in the Abbey Garden, and entrance was through the original Medieval Gate.  

The image above dates from 2015 and it was one of the rare instances of being able to photograph the gate without stacks of cars parked in front of it. I did visit the interior of the building some time in 2018 but did not post the images of it. The weather was not as sunny on this day, it was overcast and not too warm either. 

Inside the area were a few tents set up and a small roped off arena and lots of people in shining armour. There was also a canon….  I had seen this beauty at the festival in 2017, and the gun is called “Belle” and was being operated by “the Kynges Ordynaunce”.

Apparently the wheels of the carriage are the really the hardest to manufacture and not the gun (which was made in Holland). 

I looked around a bit more, hoping for some definitive shots that could convey what some of the items looked like. It is however quite strange to see the mingling of re-enactors in costume talking to people in 2019 civvies, or to spot a knight making a call on his cellphone.  There were period tents set up around a roped off space and this was where some of the action was going to happen.

(1500 x 573)

I believe this was the King’s tent, but I didn’t ask just in case he roped me in on his side. I am strictly neutral in these matters and don’t take sides. This year will see the 548th Anniversary of the Battle of Tewkesbury which will be celebrated on Monday (while we are all at work!)

There was also a very impressive horse having a snack to one side. He was also here to be made used to the loud bangs that the canon would make; very important if he is to be used in a makeshift battle.

Off to one side was another roped off arena where they were having a demonstration on the famous Longbow that the English archers were so effective with.

I believe a well trained archer could fire off 7 arrows a minute, whereas a combatant armed with a primitive firearm could take as long as a minute to reload his muzzle loading weapon. 

I am sure the combatants that had to wear the armour were glad that it was not a terribly hot day, or that the sun was warming the metal hot enough to fry eggs off.

The canon was trundled across to where the archers were and set up. One of the red coated gun crew then explained a bit about the weapon and the advantages and disadvantages of the early canon. This particular weapon is a muzzle loader, and the well drilled team soon had it ready to fire. I do have video of the gun firing and will upload it to my Youtube channel at some point. 

It is quite loud though and there were a few spooked children walking around with their hands over their ears.  

Then it was back to the other roped off area where there was a melee between two armoured men. 

The dude in blue won that one.

And then there was a four way melee, one of the occupants being “The King” (accompanied by shouts of “The YORK”). This one was quite quite hectic and the King bore the brunt of the attacks. 

It was all in good fun though, but was evidently hard work as the combatants were drenched by the time all was done and dusted. 

It was time for me to make tracks as I didn’t have much more to see. The more interesting events would be happening tomorrow much to my dismay. The Medieval Festival for 2019 happens on the 13th and 14 of July, and that could be worth attending. Until then here are some random images. Special thanks must go to those who took the time and effort to put on this small glimpse into the past.

DRW © 2019. Created 05/05/2019

Updated: 06/05/2019 — 16:25

Overbury and out

In October 2018 I visited the village of Overbury as part of my village tour. I had really stopped there to photograph the War Memorial; however the legibility of the memorial is poor due to wear on the stone plaques and base. I did notice a newish screenwall structure in the churchyard, and on a trip through to Evesham saw a stone mason at work on the wall. Could it be they were reproducing the war memorial names onto the screenwall? There was only one way to find out and that was to head out and see for myself. I had to leave enough time for the work to be completed though and as a result I only tackled this visit in 2019.

The image above shows the lychgate of St Faith’s, Overbury. The central plinth has the plaques on either side of it.  The new structure is shown below.

Unfortunately my supposition was wrong and it does not have the Roll of Honour on it, but a list of names of those who may be buried here or who were cremated, with their ashes interred at this spot. There went my theory down the pipes.  I now had anything of up to an hour to spend while waiting for my bus onwards to Evesham. The next hamlet on the road is Conderton, but it is too far to walk to and look around in such a short space of time so I remained in Overbury. I had photographed quite a bit of it in 2018, so I really wanted to add to those images. 

St Faith’s, Overbury

Behind St Faith’s is Overbury Court, a Georgian house dating from 1740. It is privately owned so I did not try for a photograph of it. The gate is in the lane next to the church.

There were too many comings and goings in the lane so I did not even attempt a peek through the railings. But the house has extensive gardens and it is a very picturesque area. You can see part of the roof of the house in the image below.

Heading back towards the bus shelter, I looked left and right and didn’t cross the street.

Looking right (towards Kemerton/Bredon)

You may think that these rural roads are quiet but it was a regular hustle and bustle which was made worse by the narrow roads, parked vehicles, the occasional tractor, horses and delivery vans.

The bus shelter (route towards Tewkesbury)

Possibly the village hall. The window is inscribed “Erected by Robert Martin in the year 1896”

I walked for awhile, enjoying the countryside and the horses having an early breakfast. 

(1500 x 506)

There was also the village cricket pitch for those who have 5 days to spare.

Cricket pitch pavilion

(1500 x 501) The cricket pitch

Dare I say “Howzat?”

This is the road looking back towards Overbury, the building on the left is a pub and the building on the right may have once been a tollgate/booth given how the window impinges onto the road. 

The road to Conderton

(1500 x 533)

Overbury Church Of England First School

The village shop and post office

My mission was accomplished. Had I planned it slightly better I probably would have been able to visit Conderton too, but my planning was not great and I had limited time available to get a bus. I wanted to visit Evesham after this so really had to get on the road. Look, there is my bus, I must go… 

DRW © 2019. Created 30/04/2019

Updated: 04/05/2019 — 08:09

A brief burst of pink

Last week I posted about Spring and one of the images was of an ornamental cherry tree (aka “Sakura“) that was flowering. I had never seen any of these until I came to the UK, and this seemingly normal tree shows its true colours when Spring finally comes around. 

The clusters of pink blossoms are very beautiful, and I really look forward to seeing them probably because the sakura is a very common theme in anime. It pops up in many of the series I watch and I am currently reading a fanfiction about Clannad, where one of the characters is intent on becoming the student council president so that she can save the sakura that are due to be cut down. It does sound corny but the Japanese do hold the sakura in esteem. 

Today when I came home the tree was loosing its blossoms and the area underneath it was becoming a pink carpet as the blossoms fell.

The wind was clustering the many petals into hollows in the road and the drizzle ensured that they stayed there, it was really something to see. By next week the sakura will be back to its normal summer foliage and the cycle of rebirth will start again. Such are the ways of nature.

Of course it is not only the Sakura blossoming, but every other tree that is capable of producing blossoms has done so. This beauty was close to where I work.

In South Africa we have a similar situation with Jacaranda trees. These were planted in the pavements of Johannesburg and Pretoria probably during the 40’s or 50’s and every year they undergo a similar burst of colour as they bloom and then loose their blossoms, coating the area underneath them in a carpet of purple. 

You can really see the effect in the image I took on Northcliffe Ridge a few years back.

Jacarandas in the Northcliffe/Fairlands area (1500 x 811)

Trees really can surprise one, we live with them all around us, and generally do not pay too much notice of them except when they undergo change; loosing leaves, blossoming or falling down are all part of the life cycle of a tree. Their advanced age is interesting because many of them outlive us, and some survive for centuries. The world would be a boring place without them, so hug a tree today. 

DRW © 2019. Created 25/04/2019

Updated: 27/04/2019 — 07:09

Spring has sprung

Yep, it’s true, Spring has arrived, or should I say sunny days arrived for this Easter weekend; which made a nice change from the often overcast and gloomy weather that we seemed to have had since I got back from South Africa. My weather app says it is 22 degrees outside and will it remain like that till Tuesday.  However, it better not turn ugly again because I have plans for Saturday! Anyway, I digress because this post is just one of those springy thingys that came about because I went for a walk this morning. I have not been very active this past month because I was battling sinus, but finally feel much better. Enjoy the pics, they were taken with my celery phone so quality could be variable.

Miss Emily also made a rare appearance in her all new ice cream dress, hat and sandals. She does look snazzy too. Although I did remind her that soon it will be Back to School….

And that was/is Spring for now. Unfortunately my 4 day holiday turned out to be only 2 days long because of work. The extra money will come in handy but it wont be used to buy ice cream with.

DRW © 2019. Created 21/04/2019

Updated: 21/04/2019 — 13:24

Scanning the Slides

When I was still photographing ships in the pre-digital days I was shooting with slide film. There were many advantages to it at the time. The large images displayed on a screen were amazing to see and much better than the standard small prints that were the result of shooting with film. Pricewise it was slightly cheaper to shoot and process 36 slides than it was to develop and print 36 prints. And of course the prints were only as good as the operator of the printing machine. When the digital era arrived I really wanted to convert my slides into a digital format and the first results that I still have is a contact sheet that a friend of mine made on a professional film scanner at his work in 1999. Unfortunately the resulting images, while excellent copies were only 640×480 in size.

A few years later I bought a “Genius” flatbed scanner that could scan slides, and the results were mixed. Because many of the images had vast expanses of blue water in them I could not get a semi decent outcome because the scanner lamp had a slight blue tinge to it and rendered the images less than perfect. The scanner wasn’t faulty either because I even sat with a technician from the company and we were just not able to get a perfect result, or one as good as the contact sheet above. 

I never gave up though and at one point I bought a high end Epson scanner and it could scan slides and negatives but the interface tended to be somewhat iffy. The end result was much better and in some case I had a lot of success with the scanner, so much so that 90% of the ship and cruise images on my blogs were created with that scanner. I did not scan everything though, some images just came out badly and and others I skipped because there was too much to do. 

The scanner did produce some amazing results from negatives, and while I did not even tackle them as a project I really should have, although I never used an SLR for prints.

The images above are both scanned from the 1986 negatives. 

In 2010 I bought a dedicated slide/negative scanner that had just come onto the market and frankly it was a waste of time and money. Surely there were other ways to convert slides to digital? 

Since the advent of the digital camera (and high end cell phone camera too) there are other possible ways to scan slides and when I was in South Africa I did some experimenting. The end results were interesting although some images were a disaster due to focusing issues. My “rig” looked something like this:  

I have a small battery powered pocket slide viewer that I bought in the USA, and it formed the display part of my machine.

I also have a cut down enlarger head stand that enables me to get up close and personal with a document (or slide viewer) parallel to my camera.

 

And of course my digital camera forms the last part of it all and I initially set the camera on the “Macro” setting and set this up in a dark room with the only illumination coming from the viewer screen. The reality is that I was taking a very close up shot of a displayed slide. 

The output.

It was mixed. Some images came out so well, while others were lousy. The focusing being the biggest issue and that may have been a problem with camera shake or me misfocusing or in some cases the slide is slightly bowed.  I am still sorting the 1331 images that I photographed, so cannot comment on whether this was a success or not. The biggest problem I had was not being able to see the output on a monitor after I did it and now that I am back in the UK I cannot redo the images as the slides are in South Africa. I do however feel that the theory is sound, and I would have liked to have seen what a cell phone camera does under the same conditions, alas I did not have a way to mount one with me so could not try it out. 

I am not done yet and will reserve my verdict till after I have sorted and culled. But it is worth considering as an option if ever slides need digitising. 

To be continued.

DRW © 2019. Created 21/03/2019

Updated: 24/03/2019 — 13:57

Back home in England.

It is now 19.30 on the evening of the 7th and I am back home, surrounded by washing, empty suitcases, clothing, postcards and heaps of other odds and ends that I brought back with me. My flight left last night at 9 pm, and we landed just after 6 this morning. I have spent the time between then and 4 pm in queues, trains, buses and Paddington Station. 

A lot happened between my previous post of the 24th of February and now. I split my time between my brother’s house and my friends on the West Rand, although was not as active in the local cemeteries as I was previously. My mother is surprisingly strong, but I fear that she is trapped inside her body and is probably hating every minute of it. Unfortunately we had to make the decision that we made in 2017, there were no more options available to us.  Sadly she is surrounded by other elderly women of various ages, many never get visited and lead out their lonely lives in the home. I am afraid that in some cases they have outlived their children, or their children are no longer in the area or in the country. 

Menu from my return flight

There is a lot I can say about South Africa. Corruption has seriously damaged the economy, and the continued demand by Eskom for higher tariffs is met with disgust as the public recalls how easily Eskom and the corrupt in it seemingly burnt money with impunity. To this date no high profile crooks have been arrested for corruption and  they continue to lead the high life, safe in the knowledge that they got away with it.

The few malls that I visited were also showing the effects of the economic downturn, with empty shops and fewer buying customers visiting them. Generally though I had good service from 99% of the people I encountered in my travels in and around the West and East Rand. The petrol price continues to bite though, and of course the traffic jams in Johannesburg are even worse as a large portion of the one freeway has had to be closed to repair some of the supports and bridges that are part of it.  

Muffin the cat continues to amuse, at this moment he is thinking of entering politics and is trying to register his own political party called “The Fishycookie Party”. By his reckoning he could be the chief poohbah in the next election because at least he wont be corrupt, although is liable to sleep in parliament. 

Again I got to enjoy the pets of my brother and friends during this trip, and it is amazing how they enrich our lives; there is never a dull moment when you have a cat or a dog.

The weather back in South Africa was hot and very uncomfortable as I really prefer the relatively cooler summers of the UK. I do not do heat well! We did have a typical highveld thunder/rain storm in my last week, and I had forgotten how much water these could dump and how bad the thunderstorms can get in Johannesburg. Back in the UK it was overcast and drizzly where I live, but the march to Summer continues.  

Suburbia (1500×671)

Prices.

Food prices continue to rise and I did quite a few comparisons with the prices I gathered way back in 2017.  These are just a few examples that I spotted, and some items may have been on sale. The items are not indicative of my own personal preferences and are sourced through leaflets and shops I visited in the West and East Rand. Petrol was R14.08 pl 95 octane and R13.86 for 93 octane (02/03/2019)

6 Eskort Gold Medal Pork Sausages: R44.91

Kellogs Corn Flakes (750gr) R49.99

Beef Biltong R320/kg

Oreo 16’s R14.99

Sedgewick’s Old Brown Sherry 750 ml R44.95 (R39 in duty free at ORT airport)

Milo 500gr tin R51.99

2 Litres Coke R16.99

Cadbury’s Chocolate (80g slab) R19.95

Oral B electric toothbrush R499.95

Jungle Oats (1kg) R26.99

Weetbix (900 gr) R38.99

Wellingtons Tomato Sauce (700 ml) RR18.99

Baby Soft 2 ply toilet rolls (18’s) R124.99

Lipice (4.6 g) R22.99

Sunlight dishwashing Liquid (750 ml) R32.99

Joko Tea (60 bags) R32.99

Milo (500 gr) R54.99

Ricoffy (750 g) R79.99

Mrs Balls Chutney (470 g) R28.99

Douwe Egberts Pure Gold coffee (200 g) R119.99

Crystal Valley salted butter (500 gr) R47.99

Nature’s Garden mixed veg (2,5kg) R25.99

30 Large eggs R49.99

Stork Country Spread 1kg R29.99 

Dewfresh milk 6×1 Litre R69.99 (R11.99 ea)

Gordons Gin 750ml R99.99

Hunters Dry 12x440ml Cans R129.99  

30 Extra large eggs R44.99  

Ultra Mel Custard 1 Litre R22.99

Enterprise Back Bacon 200gr R23.99

Fresh chicken breast fillets (R59.99/kg

Huletts white sugar (2.5 kg) R39.99

Lipton ice tea (1,5 litre) R17.99

King Steer burger R64.90, Regular chips: R15.90  2019

95 Octane petrol R14.08, (/02/03/2019)

4 Finger Kitkat R8.99

48 Beacon Mallow Eggs R79.99

Tabasco Sauce (60ml) R38.99

 

Random Images

DRW © 2019. Created 07/03/2019

Updated: 24/03/2019 — 14:03

Now that was quick snow

This past week has been like a giant countdown to the end of the world, or heavy snow depending on what you read. I was working the afternoon shift and Tuesday’s weather forecast was for heavy snow on Thursday evening. I don’t ride my bicycle when it snows or freezes so I could foresee somewhat of a problem with getting home after midnight. Fortunately the forecast was adjusted to light snow for our area, although other parts of the UK were hit by heavy snowfalls. 

This morning it was white outside again, although not as white as it had been in March last year, and because of the times I was working I more or less missed it. These are some of the pics I managed to take on my way to work. It was relatively dark and I used my phone to take them. 

While I was resizing the image above I could not help being struck by how much that looks like a trench during Winter. All that was missing was barbed wire and gunfire.

 

By home time this afternoon there was no sign of snow. Miss Emily is not amused!

DRW © 2019. Created 01/02/2019

Updated: 17/02/2019 — 08:21

Hungry Elephants on the loose!

There are many things to see in Cheltenham, and I used to see the Elephant Rampage mosaics in lane called Grosvenor Place South ( 51.898817°,  -2.071789°) each time I went to the Lidl in Cheltenham, and I have always meant to use the images but never did. Today I am finally posting the pics of the mosaic. Unfortunately some of the name plates have been stolen, and I hope to root around and see whether I can at least add in the information. The story is really about the circus that came to town and the elephants hat made an unscheduled stop. I am posting them in the direction that they are supposed to be viewed from (top to bottom in this case). The story is told in better detail at http://cheltenhamdailyphoto-marley.blogspot.com/2008/04/elephant-rampage.html

Enticed by the irresistible aroma drifting from Bloodworths Corn Merchants they raided the feed store
Their keeper frantically struggled to control their errant charges
Amazed Cheltonians and the local constabulary watched with alarm and delight

DRW © 2018 – 2019. Created 23/12/2018

Updated: 23/12/2018 — 08:24

The Musings Advent Calender 2018

I started this in 2015, so this is really the 4th year in a row I have done it. Hopefully some of the pics will not have been seen before. Hang onto your hat, and open the little doorway. (Newest image is at the top of the page)

24 December

The Christmas Truce

23 December

Spotted in Cheltenham. Created by John D’oh

22 December

21 December

20 December

Castle Park, Bristol

19 December

18 December

Cholera Epidemic Memorial. Tewkesbury Cemetery

The Cholera Epidemic Memorial commemorates 76 locals who passed away from in the Cholera epidemic in 1832 and 54 locals who suffered the same fate in 1849

17 December

Steampunkian thingey, Mumbles Pier

16 December

Voortrekker Monument, Pretoria

Information board

In South Africa the 16th of  December used to be celebrated as “Geloftedag” (aka Day of the Covenant, Day of the Vow, Dingaans Day), and the Voortrekker Monument featured very strongly in the day. On 16 December the sun shines through a hole in the roof and shines on a  slab in the middle of the building.  Since 1994 the day has been called “Day of Reconciliation”.

15 December

Magistrates chair from 1885 (Tewkesbury Museum)

14 December

He’s so fluffy!!

13 December

12 December

Seen in Stroud

11 December

Emerging bike (Evesham)

10 December

Princess Mary’s Gift (Almonry Museum, Evesham)

09 December

Wind indicator, thermometer and barometer. (Evesham)

08 December

Battle Honours: HMS Victorious

07 December

Morris Dancers in Evesham

06 December

Detail from the Exchange War Memorial in Liverpool

05 December

Piano for the playing at Bristol Temple Meads

04 December

Street art in Bristol

03 December

Unicorn in Bristol

02 December

Public art: Bristol

01 December

Olde house in Tewkesbury

DRW © 2018 – 2019.

Updated: 04/01/2019 — 06:51
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