musings while allatsea

Musings of a curious individual

Month: July 2016

Welland Steam and Country Rally (Odds and Sods)

Having come this far you are probably asking yourself “Isn’t it enough already?”

I have bad news. There is even more. In this section I am going to add some of those odd objects and uncategorised vehicles that I saw that caught my eye. Some are not even vehicles!

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Enuff said! Bring on the images!

Yes it is steam powered

Yes it is steam powered

The part that goes "Parp"

The part that goes “Parp”

 
   
   
   
   

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© DRW 2016-2018. Created 31/07/2016

Updated: 01/01/2018 — 16:23

Welland Steam and Country Rally (Traction Engines)

 [ First Page ] [ Military Vehicles ] [ Cars and Trucks ] [ Traction Engines ] [ Odds and Sods ]

For me the drawcard of a steam rally are items that use steam as a means of propulsion or to do stuff with. Diesel just does not have that same pulling ability that steam does, and a perfect example was the steam shovel. Close by was a similar diesel powered shovel and more people were watching the steam powered version even though they were both doing the same thing. 

I am fortunate that I do have the catalogue so may be able to Identify some of the machines in my pics, however the pics taken in the arena are quite dark because of the heavy cloud cover that was developing. 

The highlight of the traction engines was definitely the Showman’s Engines. I was amazed at how big they were, most that I had seen previously had all been miniatures. This was the first time I had seen full sized versions.

Most of these machines were already blinding to the eyes, but the shining continued all the time.

The dynamo/generator/alternator is mounted on a shroud protruding over the smokebox door, and even that was spotless.

The agricultural sector was also well represented with ploughing engines in action, these too are huge machines, and even they are spotlessly clean as can be seen by this Fowler ploughing engine. 

There were a number of traction engine cranes at the fair, and I find them fascinating because of their sheer size and the ability to lift things. I have however not seem one of them in action (much to my dismay).

The steam powered trucks and lorries have also always been a favourite of mine, there is something about that transition between traction engine and truck that I find fascinating. There were quite a few on display too, so choosing pics is difficult.

What I did find quite impressive was this Burrell Road Locomotive trundling along with it’s load consisting of a boiler. You did not want to stand in it’s way.

Overall though there were a lot of engines, and trying to show each one is impossible, because there were potentially 72 full sized machines, 34 miniatures as well as 22 showmen’s engines, and I doubt whether I saw half of them.

And when all was said and done,

and they had lined up,

one by one.

With a mighty roar,

and spray of steam,

their whistles farewell did scream.

Final line up (1500x636)

Final line up (1500×636)

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McLaren 6" showmans engine "Goliath"

McLaren 6″ showmans engine “Goliath”

Fowler "Lord Doverdale" (1917)

Fowler “Lord Doverdale” (1917)

Ruston Proctor 6" scale

Ruston Proctor 6″ scale

Marshall No 28922.  “Alderman”

   
Wm Foster & Co. "Pride of Freystrop"

Wm Foster & Co.

“Pride of Freystrop”

Ransomes, Sims & Jefferies. "Velfrey Queen"

Ransomes, Sims & Jefferies.

“Velfrey Queen”

The Burrell "Herbert's Galloping Horses on tour"

The Burrell “Herbert’s Galloping Horses on tour”

Garrett No 34085

“Baroness”

   
McLaren 1332 "Gigantic"

McLaren 1332 “Gigantic”

Garrett 4" model "Muriel"

Garrett 4″ model “Muriel”

   
Burrell Road Locomotive "Duke of Kent"

Burrell Road Locomotive

“Duke of Kent”

Aveling & Porter 10072 "Achilles"

Aveling & Porter 10072

“Achilles”

Burrell 3" "Gladwys"

Burrell 3″ “Gladwys”

Garrett 6" "Claire"

Garrett 6″ “Claire”

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 31/07/2016. Bad poetry by DR Walker.

Updated: 01/01/2018 — 16:24

Welland Steam and Country Rally (Cars and Trucks)

 [ First Page ] [ Military Vehicles ] [ Cars and Trucks ] [ Traction Engines ] [ Odds and Sods

In this section I will deal mainly with Vintage cars and trucks. There were a lot of both and it never ceases to amaze me how many vintage vehicles there are on the roads in the UK, and how many used to be quite common on the roads in South Africa.  It is difficult to decide which to include and which to exclude though because they are all really a record of the past and their owners do lavish a lot of time and effort on them. I am relying heavily on the programme to ID most of these vehicles. Vintage commercial vehicles may be found after the car images.

Vintage and Classic Cars.

Citroen DS29 saloon

Citroen DS29 saloon

Vanden Plas Princess 1300

Vanden Plas Princess 1300 (1970)

A pair of Zodiacs

A pair of Zodiacs

Steam powered Lykamobile

Steam powered Lykamobile

1931 Jowett Shooting Brake

1931 Jowett Shooting Brake

Austin 7 Ruby Saloon (1935)

Austin 7 Ruby Saloon (1935)

De Dion Bouton Type AM open drive (1906)

De Dion Bouton Type AM (1906)

Morgan 3 wheeler Aero (1927)

Morgan 3 wheeler Aero (1927)

Berkeley T60 3 wheeler (1960)

Berkeley T60 3 wheeler (1960)

BMW Isetta (1959)

BMW Isetta (1959)

Vauxhall Viva (1966)

Vauxhall Viva (1966)

Riley 1 RME Saloon (1952)

Riley 1½ litre RME Saloon (1952)

Ford Zodiac

Ford Zodiac (1964)

Ford Capri 3000 (1971)

Ford Capri 3000 (1971)

Ford Escort 1200 (1974)

Ford Escort 1200 (1974)

Morris Minor 100 Traveller 1968

Morris Minor 100 Traveller (1968)

Austin 7 Special Sports. (1936)

Austin 7 Special Sports. (1936)

Chev Nomad Estate (1957)

Chev Nomad Estate (1957)

VW Beetle (1973)

VW Beetle (1973)

Ford Cortina 1500 (1966)

Ford Cortina 1500 (1966)

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Vintage and Classic Commercial Vehicles.

Bedford Dormobile 1958

Bedford Dormobile 1958

Ford Thames Trader (1964)

Ford Thames Trader (1964)

Austin FGK 100 Dropside van 1966

Austin FGK 100 Dropside van (1966)

Bedford TK Flatbed truck (1976)

Bedford TK Flatbed truck (1976)

Austin A35 Van (1967)

Austin A35 Van (1967)

Ford Transit Dropside Van (1970)

Ford Transit Dropside Van (1970)

Bullnose Bedford (1955)

Bullnose Bedford (1955)

Ford F1 Pickup Truck (1951)

Ford F1 Pickup Truck (1951)

Volvo Plaxton Supreme Coach (1979)

Volvo Plaxton Supreme Coach (1979)

Bedford CA Van (1969)

Bedford CA Van (1969)

Bedford O Type Tipper (1947)

Bedford O Type Tipper (1947)

ERF Flatbed Truck (1971)

ERF Flatbed Truck (1971)

ERF Showman's Box Van (1945)

ERF Showman’s Box Van (1945)

Scammell Ballast Box Tractor (1962)

Scammell Ballast Box Tractor (1962)

Foden DG6/15 Flatbed Truck (1946)

Foden DG6/15 Flatbed Truck (1946)

Scammell Explorer Recovery Truck (1955)

Scammell Explorer Recovery Truck (1955)

Scammell Mechanical Horse Artic (1936)

Scammell Mechanical Horse Artic (1936)

Commer Karrier Dustcart (1974)

Commer Karrier Dustcart (1974)

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 31/07/2016

Updated: 01/01/2018 — 16:24

Welland Steam and Country Rally (Military Vehicles)

[ First page ] [ Military Vehicles ] [ Cars and Trucks ] [ Traction Engines ] [ Odds and Sods

The Military Vehicles really interested me because of my own time in the military and of course a general interest in things military. As mentioned, most of the equipment on display was of American origin, with a smattering of other nationals equipment.

The tracked vehicles really stole the show, and one vehicle in particular was really impressive. I had never seen (or heard of) a M18 Hellcat Tank Destroyer before, but be rest assured I know about them now! 

This vehicle would show its paces in the arena a bit later and it was astounding! Capable of 80 km/h they could probably run rings around most tanks on level ground. The 76mm was not the perfect weapon, but in the hands of a skilled crew could cause havoc. 

Tank number 2 was not American, but rather a PzKpfw 38(t) from 1943, originally built by Skoda of Czechoslovakia. This vehicle is currently under preservation and this was probably the first time it has been under it’s own power in 60 years.  

She was not much to see in the arena though, and I suspect the Hellcat would have run rings around it.

The next tracked vehicle of interest was what I think is an LVT (Landing Vehicle tracked), also known as an “Amtrak”. She too was fast, and really churned up the grass behind her.

The other interesting tracked vehicle my guide identifies as an Alvis 432, and it is a British Army AFV

Of course there were two American half tracks on the move and they too were quick on their feet, wheels and tracks…  My personal favourite was there too, with its quad 50 cal Brownings.

I had seen this beauty before at the GWR military themed day in April

On display was a Daimler Dingo Armoured Scout Car. Surprisingly small it was incredibly agile and an extremely popular vehicle.

It is however quite strange in that the transmission included a preselector gearbox and that gave five speeds in both directions, it was also fitted with a four-wheel steering system and had a tight turning circle of 7.0 m. Personally I find it confusing as to which end is the front (the image above shows the rear of the vehicle).

The closest equivalent at the fair was probably the ubiquitous Jeep of which there were many variants on display. My personal favourite mounted a 50 cal Browning, but then you can cure many things with a 50 cal. 

Standing out amongst the drab was an SAS Land Rover long range desert patrol vehicle from 1968. Known as “Pinkies” for their Mountbatten Pink camo, this particular vehicle saw service in Oman in with the SAS from 1969-1974.

Now compare that to this overloaded mountain of kit on wheels.

I missed the information sheet for this one, but the entry number lists it as Land Rover Dinkie from 1986.  Judging by the amount of kit it is festooned with it is probably a modern equivalent of the Pinkie. Somewhere in there is the driver and passenger.

There was another nice vehicle on display that I really liked, but unfortunately I am unable to identify it as I cannot see it’s entrant number 

Number 96 was an Austin Tourer from 1929, and I suspect this must have been used as a military runabout inside a base. I can’t quite picture it in the heat of battle. It is however a wonderful little vehicle.

As mentioned before, there were a lot of Jeeps on display, and this fitted in very well with my interest in trains. 

The vehicle carrying the drain pipe originated in Sweden and is a Volvo TGB IIII, and the drainpipe with its elevating mechanism is seen in the stowed position, there is even a cutout for the weapon in the windscreen.

The weapon is a 90mm recoilless rifle, although I doubt whether this is the the real thing and is probably a replica.  I hope the whole package was more reliable than the 106mm recoilless rifles we had in the SADF that were mounted on Jeeps. 

Number 97 is a GMC 353, also known as a “Deuce and a half”.

There are many variations of this truck, and a number were on display at the fair. Workhorses like these are what kept the Allies supplied in the Second World War, and many would be very useful in the post war economies of Europe and America. 

The oldie below with the twin Bren mount is a Humber 1 ton cargo pickup, and was originally an ex RME signals repair truck.  

In the background is a flatnose Bedford which I also encountered in the South African Defence Force in 1 SAI in Bloemfontein.

That more or less covers the more memorable vehicles in the military equipment line up, although I am going to add many more into the Random Pics gallery below. Where I can identify a vehicle I will add in the description.  According to the programme there were theoretically 113 military vehicles there. No wonder I came away with so many pics.

[ First page ] [ Military Vehicles ] [ Cars and Trucks ] [ Traction Engines ] [ Odds and Sods ]

Random Images.

Bullnose Bedford RL (1966)

Dodge WC38 (1940)

Dodge WC38 (1940)

 
VW Kubelwagen

VW TYP82 (1943)

 
Dodge WC52 (1942)

Dodge WC52 (1942)

 
Norton Combination 1939

Norton Combination 1939

 
Thorneycroft Nubian 1944

Thorneycroft Nubian 1944

   
 
Auto Union Munga (1964)

Auto Union Munga (1964)

 
Half-track

Half-track

 
Chevrolet G506 Tipper

Chevrolet G506 Tipper

 
Scammell Explorer (1953)

Scammell Explorer (1953)

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 31/07/2016

Updated: 01/01/2018 — 16:24

Welland Steam and Country Rally (I)

This morning we headed off to the Welland Steam and Country Rally which is held at Woodside Farm, Welland, Worcestershire. The weather had been changeable lately, and there were periods of cloud and blue skies, but overall it was a great day.

Because of the amount of images I took (over 800) I have split this blog post into as 5 parts because there was a lot to see: ranging from scooters, vintage cars, traction engines, military vehicles, strange steam shovels, stationary engines, vintage trucks, and everything in between. I had no real priority though because it all went pear shaped when we arrived and I realised there was a lot on display.

[ This page ] [ Military Vehicles ] [ Cars and Trucks ] [ Traction Engines ] [ Odds and Sods

Regular followers of my blogs will know I have an eclectic taste in many things, so I did take a lot of pics. Some good, some bad.

The area where the rally was held was a large one, but then there were a lot of exhibits on display and a lot of people too. In fact there were quite a large number of dogs accompanying visitors, and that can be quite confusing.

For me there were a number of highlights, although not much would beat the steam shovel. 

This machine belched steam and smoke from a number of places as it grabbed bits of gravel from the pit and deposited it on the other side. There was just something about it that held you spellbound. I have never seen a steam powered version of one of these in action before and it was fantastic. I have video of it on my youtube channel.

Another machine that I was hoping to see in action was a 1901 Dubs steam engine with a crane mounted on it. I had first seen one of these at Chasewater Railway  but was curious to see one in action.

Unfortunately she never really worked, she just seemed to run backwards and forwards on a length of track and that was it. She is not an easy loco to photograph either, and this image was probably my best. 

There was another crane that I wanted to see in action, because there were remnants of one at Sanrasm North Site, but this crane did not have much of a  “wow!” factor. 

In this area they had a number of working machines powered by steam, and the crane was used to pick up logs to feed into a steam driven circular saw, I did look for the “damsel in distress” about to be rendered into messy bits by the saw but ‘ealth ‘n safety were having none of that.

and Scrumpy was just dog tired.

This area also had a makeshift navvy camp and it was interesting because as usual no work was being done. In fact the one item I really wanted to see doing something wasn’t doing anything! 

And here he is… 

Just waiting for me to turn my back so that he can rattle down the track while I am not looking. I was really hoping that this was some previously undiscovered narrow gauge loco, but it turns out that it is not, The builders plate identifies her as Wilbrighton Wagon Works Number 2, (2007) so she is really a newbuild and carries the name “Howard”.  I cannot find out too much about her as yet, but she tentatively seems to belong to the Statfold Barn Railway, Tamworth, in Staffordshire. I will have to do more reading about this one I am afraid.

Part of the attraction of the rally was the fun fair and the attendant Showmans Engines.  Most of the traction engines i have seem have been smaller versions, these were the fulll size machines and they were stunning. They had so many people swarming over them cleaning that it was difficult to get a clean shot of the machines.

There is a an overhang at the front of the machine and that is where the dynamo (generator?) is bolted onto that is run via a belt to the flywheel of the engine. 

110 Volts, 220 Amps. That is quite an impressive piece of kit! 

But then when you are running one of these you need all the power you can generate. 

Close to the fun fair was the Military Vehicle display which sucked me in as per usual. Although much to my dismay most of the equipment was of American origin. 

With the exception of this stunning Kübelwagen 

I have posted the military vehicles in a separate post but for now will leave you with a pic of a vehicle that does bring back memories of my own time in the SADF.

The Bullnose Bedford we knew as the “Vasbyt Bedford” and they were painted that ugly “Nutria” colour that the SADF used. I actually drove one of them in Jan Kemp Dorp and nearly demolished the only hairdresser and robots in the dorpie.

The arena was not too far away, and during the day they held a display of vintage cars and bikes, as well as military vehicles, small scale traction engines and of course full size traction engines. Some of these will all be dealt with separately.

Walking a bit further there there was a nice display of various vintage stationary engines/pumps/generators/ and similar machines.  They are odd machines to see because many are incredibly reliable and quite old. I always find it amusing how every now and they they emit a solitary “splut!”. I usually do not photograph these odd machines but they can be fascinating in their own right.

This 1929 Gardner 2 stroke reversible diesel engine was running and was one of a pair of engines that were used on board the motor yacht Cordelia II.  

While all this was going on, a number of giant calliope type machines were churning out a selection of oompah elevator music that impinged on the ear drums the moment you came with range.

The irritation factor of these things is huge, although I have to admit I am impressed that it can produce something almost recognisable as music, or should that be muzak?

Having done a circumnavigation of the site it was time to start watching out for when the arena events were happening. So far the vintage cars had been on display as had a selection of motor cycles. 

Next on the list was the smaller version engines. These I was was used to seeing because most of the rallies I had been to had featured the smaller versions. This rally had the fully size machines and some were really huge. But first…. 

and then…….

Followed by…..

I had secured myself a nice ringside rail to lean against (later upgraded to a chair) and could settle down to watch the parade.

My self imposed limit of pics on a page allows me to share some random images before we reach the end. 

[ This page ] [ Military Vehicles ] [ Cars and Trucks ] [ Traction Engines ] [ Odds and Sods ]

 

Random Stuff

 

 

To be continued

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 30/07/2016

Updated: 01/01/2018 — 16:25

Photo Essay: The Sunday Blommie

As Winter changed to Spring and then to Summer I cannot help but watch the transformation of the area around me. The large field I go past on the cycle track is a mass of vegetation. The Brook is running low and the vegetation is becoming more thicker as time passes.

One of the oddities I have been watching are two plant species that I had never seen before. The first is associated with Scotland.

I had not noticed that there were Thistles on my route until they started to flower, and they are really very pretty. The dominant spikey plant I had been seeing is known as a Teasle and I was eager to see what they looked like when they flowered, 

Their bushes are over a metre high, with multiple heads that are huge. I was not sure what they would look like when they flowered though, I suspected it would by similar to the thistle; a head of purple flowers. I was wrong, and they turned out to be very different to what I expected.

I expect during this week all the remaining Teasles will start exploding in colour, and hopefully they will not get knocked down by rampaging children with too much time on their hands. 

On my way to the supermarket the other morning I nearly fell off my bike when I saw this huge member of the thistle family.

Known as a “Cardoon” it is also known as an the artichoke thistle. There were only the two flowers in bloom when I first saw it.

I have been keeping an eye on it each time I was in the area  and it is now in the closing stages of blooming by the looks of it, and last night (12/08) I shot this image

The whole area has become an eruption of colour as the seasons have changed, and while I am generally not a flower lover I have been taking photographs of some of the gardens and displays in the town. Frankly I have been very impressed. 

Flowers by the boat load

Flowers by the boat load

I usually post my “Sunday Blommie” pics to my friend in South Africa for her to admire. and what strikes me is I do not recall seeing such floral displays in South Africa because the houses  all tend to have these giant walls with electrified fences on them. This is however just a small selection of what I see as the seasons have changed. And appropriately I have also seen the flower the epitomises the many World War One posts I have been making lately:

The red of the poppy and the purple of the thistle. It tells us a lot about those many brave men who lost their lives fighting with the South African Scottish Regiments 100 years ago.

Postscript:

It is now almost the end of September, Autumn is raging, and the teasles? their time is over until next year.

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 24/07/2016

Updated: 01/01/2018 — 16:25

Modelling the Union-Castle Line (2)

Continuing where we left off, my newest additions have arrived and I am about ready to transform them into members of my ever expanding fleet  (new additions are at the bottom of the post)

The available affordable UC models had more or less dried up by now, although some were available from Convoy Models in military garb so I decided to get at least one for the collection, and I chose Stirling Castle. The model was outstanding, and it is hard to believe how much detail is on her. She is easier to paint because you only really need 2 colours: grey and black.

Here is my Stirling Castle and her sister Athlone Castle together. Stirling is in front. (image from 10/2017)

Union Castle also had a large fleet of cargo ships, many of which served in the two world wars. I decided that I needed at least one representative of that fleet and I chose one of  “fruit ships” namely MV Rochester Castle,  Built in  1937, she took part in Operation Pedestal during WW2, and was broken up in 1970. There were 4 sisters in this class: Rochester Castle, Roxburgh Castle, Richmond Castle and Rowallan Castle. I think Convoy has them in military garb too. 

The fleet as at 26/11/2017:

(L-R) Pendennis, Pretoria, Capetown, Stirling, Athlone, Reina, Dunnottar, Durban, Llandaff, Rochester Castles. (back row) Victoria and Victoria

The two ships behind the fleet are both called “Victoria” The right hand ship being the former Dunnottar Castle, that had a very long life. First operated by the Incres Steamship Co and later by Chandris Lines under the names Victoria and The Victoria. In 1993 she joined Louis Cruise Lines as Princesa Victoria and was finally scrapped in India in 2004. 

The model I have is by Mercury I believe, and here she is with her UC iteration. 

The other Victoria on the left is amongst the many ships that I like. She is the former Sea Princess (built as Kungsholm), and she called in South Africa on a number of occasions, although mostly in Cape Town.

My usual source for UC ships also had her available in a resin cast, and she was easily adaptable to Sea Princess or Victoria, a name she carried later in her career with P&O. It was as Victoria that she did the Union-Castle 100 year centenary voyage in the year 2000.

I decided to make Sea Princess in the P&O livery

This sublime model above was in the window of a travel agent in Salisbury. How I coveted that model! 

I am considering repainting her in the Union-Castle livery so that she can join the fleet. 

At this point things dried up for awhile and I worked on other projects, the biggest one being my St Helena project and I also looked at scratch building a Carnarvon Castle, but shelved that idea when I realised that I did not have the eyesight or skills to do it successfully. However, another thought crossed my mind and I did some thinking and reading and decided on a new project. 

SA Oranje.  23/02/2018.

I have since added another Capetown Castle to my collection and it is the same as my other Capetown Castle. The reason I bought it was to convert it to SA Oranje. Theoretically I should have converted my Pretoria Castle model, but it is a commercial model and there was no way I was going to stuff it up. 

This is what I was aiming for…

SA Oranje in Cape Town (Postcard)

The only real work I had to do on her was remove the aft deckhouse and lifeboats and raise the funnel. I then modified the deckhouse and reglued it so that it was only a docking bridge, I also added a pool between it and the next deckhouse and used the top of the original funnel in my newly constructed funnel. I also have to fabricate a new mast for her and of course expend lots of white paint. So far she looks like this: 

I really like how she turned out though, and will make an interesting addition to the fleet which now stands at… 12!  I have since drilled out the area between the lifeboat davits on her and on Capetown Castle and Dunnottar Castle, now to retouch the paint. I am kind of ashamed at how many area’s I did not paint on the UC ships though and touching up shall be done! (30/03/2019, work has ceased on the ship as I am liable to damage her more than enhancing her. Make space in the showcase!)

Update 29/03/2018. 

Managed to snag myself a Transvaal Castle by CM. She is not in a mint condition, but makes a good addition to my collection. Unfortunately her signal mast was missing so I fabricated a new one, although it did not turn out too well and really needs to be remade. I always thought her conversion to Festivale enhanced her looks, she never really appealed to me. 

30/03/2018.  The Fleet now stands at 12 (plus 2 cruise liner versions).

(1434×501)

05/04/2018

I managed to buy a Windsor Castle this week, and she is made by Albatros and is really nice. Looking at her signal mast I definitely need to relook the signal mast on my Transvaal Castle and Oranje.

Hopefully this weekend I will get pics of her with the fleet bringing my collection up to 13.

13/04/2018

RMMV Carnarvon Castle by Albatros. And she is a real beaut, although some spars and masts got bent in transport. I can’t believe I wanted to try scratch build her. Good thing I broke her up on the stocks.  

I am very fond of the Carnarvon, she just looked “right” although she was much better looking after she was upgraded to a single funnel with a proper bow.  There is a really stunning model of her as an Armed Merchant Cruiser at the war museum in Johannesburg. It is not an easy model to photograph because it is quite large and the glass case reflects something awful.

My newest acquisition is the Albatros AL-148 Dunnottar Castle. It is much better than the resin cast version I have already. My Hein Muck Dunnottar has been painted grey and is now a wartime version. 

I have since acquired a number of other UC ships since this last post update including:

Bloemfontein Castle (top) and Rhodesia Castle, both by CM-KR

Bloemfontein Castle

Rhodesia Castle

and my collection now stands at….  17!

(back to front):  back row: Windsor, Transvaal, Pretoria

Capetown, Llandaff, Durban (wartime)

Pendennis, Stirling (wartime), Rhodesia

Dunnottar, Athlone, Bloemfontein

Rochester, Carnarvon, Reina Del Mar

Dunnottar (peacetime), Oranje

Actually it stands at 18 as I have just managed to snag a very nice Balmoral Castle model made by  Rhenania. Unfortunately it has yellow and black funnels instead of the usual UC red and black. She did have those funnel colours when she was being used as a Royal yacht, although her hull was then white. I have two choices, either repaint the hull or repaint the funnels.

Balmoral Castle

By sheer accident I also picked up a model of the Iolaire which was Donald Currie’s private yacht.

01/02/2019.

Capetown Castle by CM. I have a Hein Muck Capetown Castle, but really messed it up when I repainted the decks. I was never really happy with how she came out but now have a proper version of her.

Capetown Castle

The fleet looks like this now:

(1500-687)

1st column: Sea Princess, Windsor, Oranje, Pretoria, Llandaf, Dunnottar.

2nd column: Capetown, Capetown, Dunnottar, Rochester, Victoria.

3rd column: Durban,  Transvaal, Athlone, Carnarvon, Balmoral, Iolaire.

4th column: Pendennis, Striling, Reina Del Mar, Bloemfontein, Rhodesia.

The list of additions to my collection also lives on my More Small Ships page, and of course there is a master list of my collection too. What else is available? it really depends on what pops up on ebay, however I would like to add one of the wartime fruit ships to my collection, I am steadily building up a nice collection of freighters in wartime garb and she would fit in quite well. 

With a bit of digging I can now report that the following existed/may still existed/was available (my own models are in bold):

A great place to see what is out there is http://sammelhafen.de/index.php?p=uebersicht

And there you have it for now. Not an exhaustive list by any means and always a work in progress.

Keep visiting here to read about more of my UC ships. They aren’t spectacular, but are nice to have. 

DRW © 2016-2019. Created 22/07/2016. Updated and shuffled around 25/03/2018, rebuilt page again 05/04/2018, added list of 1/1250 models 05/07/2018, updated with new pics and links 15/01/2019

Updated: 02/02/2019 — 13:32

100 Years of Delville Wood.

The Battle of Delville Wood lasted from 15 July – 3 September 1916, however, South Africans commemorate the portion of the battle where the 1st South African Infantry Brigade was involved in, and that runs from the 15th till 20th of July.

My late grandfather was one of the men who entered that wood on the 15th, and today, 100 years later I cannot quite picture him with his mates digging shallow scrapes in the tree root entangled earth  of the wood. I cannot imagine him experiencing the bombardment that the Germans threw at that small portion of France, at times as high as 400 shells a minute. I cannot imagine him fighting hand to hand with Germans, and most of all I cannot even begin to imagine what the wood looked like when his comrades staggered out of it on the 20th. He was luckier than most because he was evacuated on the 18th with a shoulder wound, and as a result I am here today.

(Drawn by Frank Dadd from a description by a British Officer. The Graphic  Aug 19, 1916)

(Drawn by Frank Dadd from a description by a British Officer. The Graphic Aug 19, 1916)

I have never had the privilege of visiting the wood myself,  but I have had the privilege of sorting through over 113000 record cards from World War One and photographing nearly 8500 of them.  I would come across a lot of cards where the soldier in question had died in the wood and it was really a sobering glimpse at what we lost as a country in the month of July 1916. 

Image courtesy of Brian Roberts

However, when compared against the overall slaughter of The Somme, our casualties are mere drops in an ocean of dead soldiers. And once the last survivor had passed on Delville Wood seemed to have been finally forgotten by South Africa. The Delville Wood Memorial in France is really one that very few South Africans will visit, although I believe it is a very beautiful place.

Image courtesy of Brian Roberts

Yet, there are still many who ask about those who fought in that hell of a battle, they ask the same questions as I do, and possibly cannot picture the same things that have plagued me over the years. 

In fact Delville Wood has always been contentious in our national psyche, it is untouchable because of the blood that was shed and that small part of France that is really a small part of South Africa now. Many of those who died in the wood have no known grave, they are names on a memorial, their physical bodies vaporised or smashed to pieces in the barrage of steel:  the wood is still the real cemetery for Delville Wood.

In 2014, the remains of Private Myengwa Beleza, a black soldier, was re-interred at the memorial and in 2016, a new Roll of Honour was unveiled to honour all those South Africans who lost their lives in the First World War, and to ensure that the role played by South Africans of all races in the First and Second World Wars was accorded the necessary recognition. A new Garden of Remembrance was to be created for those who fell but whose remains were never recovered.

The list of of all South Africans who died during the battle of Delville Wood 15/20 July 1916. It lists all those who died in France. Of note, many of them are listed as having a date of death (particularly the 3rd Regt. SAI) of 1 August 1916. It wasn’t until that date a roll could be completed. Many of the prisoners taken by the Germans at Delville Wood were originally on the roll until the Red Cross could determine who had actually died in the battle. 

A SOLDIER’S SONG

Lt Frederick Carruthers Cornell, S. Africa Native Labour Corps

In Delville Wood – in Delville Wood,
The German foe in thousands lay,
And no-man’s land, with British blood,
Ran red as wine that summer’s day
We’d sworn to take it – and we would!
 

God help the Bosche in Delville Wood!
To Delville Wood – to Delville Wood,
We faced his fire, and forced our way
To where his grim machine guns stood,
And where he fiercely turned at bay –
We’d sworn to beat him – and we would!
We’d turn him out of Delville Wood!
 

In Delville Wood – in Delville Wood,
As inch by inch the ground was gained,
With bullet, steel, and smashing butt.
We fought and fell, till few remained;
But Boer and Briton steadfast stood,
For Freedom’s sake – in Delville Wood!
 

In Delville Wood – in Delville Wood,
Midst splintered trees and shattered wrack,
From morn till night we still made good
Gainst shot and shell and massed attack,
We’d sworn to win, so firm we stood –
Or died like men – in Delville Wood!
 

In Delville Wood – in Delville Wood,
The shattered trees are green with leaves,
And flowers bloom where cannons stood,
And rich the fields with golden sheaves –
Sleep soft ye dead, for God is good –
And Peace has come to Delville Wood!

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 15/07/2016. 2 Images by Brian Roberts, “In Vlaandere se Velde” courtesy of Karen Dickens.  

 

Updated: 01/01/2018 — 16:26

Nancy the Springbok Mascot

One of the more colourful mascots that was adopted by the military is Nancy, a young Springbok (Thompson’s Gazelle) that became the mascot of the 4th South African Infantry Regiment (SA Scottish). She was presented to the Regiment in August 1915 by Mr D. McClaren Kennedy who lived on the farm Vierfontein  in the Free State.

Her keeper was a bugler: Edmund Peterson of “D” Company South African Scottish, Nicknamed ‘buck major’, he was not only her keeper, but her trainer and protector. Being the official mascot, she was trained to move and trot in tune to the sound of the bagpipes and the regimental band, and she accompanied the Springboks (As South African soldiers came to be known) everywhere, even surviving the horrors of the battle of Delville Wood in 1916.

When the fighting was in the vicinity of the French town Armentieres, a shell exploded close to where Nancy had been tethered and she bolted in fright, seriously damaging her left horn against a wall. The doctors were not prepared to risk resetting the horn so it eventually grew downwards at an angle. Her out-of-alignment horn allowed her to display a golden ‘wound’-stripe on the tartan coat that she wore to stave off the cold.

In the winter of 1918 she caught pneumonia,  and although cared for by her keeper and the medical personnel, she sadly died on 26 November 1918, a few days after the war had ended. Her death was announced in General Orders and on 28 November 1918 she was buried in the cemetery in the village of Hermeton-sur-Meuse in Belgium with full military honours.

Before being buried she was skinned and her skin was sent  to a taxidermist who stuffed and mounted her effigy and that was then sent onwards to South Africa. She was on display in the Officers Mess of the Transvaal Scottish Regimental Headquarters before being presented to the South African National Museum of Military History in Saxonwold in 1958. 

Nancy is also listed at the South African War Graves Project

© DRW 2009-2018. Retrospectively created 11/07/2016. Some text from the SAMVOA Website 

Updated: 01/01/2018 — 16:26

Rest in Peace Lionel

On 10 July 1981, Bravo Company of 61 Mechanised Battalion Group was rocked to the core by the death of one of its own and the wounding of 15 of its members. If you speak to anybody that served with the company you will realise how much his death affected us. It is 35 years since he left us, but he still lives on in our memories, he is always 19 unlike the rest of us who are now mostly in our 50’s.

I was never able to visit his grave personally but I do have contacts through my own war grave photography and was able to have his grave photographed. It was a cathartic moment.

I cannot explain the circumstances of his death because I was not on that operation. I just recall the return of the company afterwards, and the sheer anger of those boys as they walked back to their tents.  We were 6 months away form kla-ing out, at that point of our service we had all gone through hell in training, only the month before we had been in in Lohathla carrying out battle group drills, and little did we realise that Ops Protea was not that far away. The tragic part is that this incident was a “blue on blue” incident. Swapo had not killed our friend, our own artillery had.

Over the years I was able to settle many of my ghosts from back then, but the strange thing is that you never really do, They are always there in the back of your mind.

The official enquiry really apportioned no blame, and according to General Roland De Vries there was no such thing as “acceptable losses through training”. I respect his stance, but given how badly the SADF treated national servicemen  I will always question that.

It will not bring back the young 19 year old, or heal the wounds of the 15 others. We still have the duty to make sure that we remember Lionel Van Rooyen and that he does not become yet another statistic on a memorial.

 

 

Lionel Van Rooyen is buried in Stellawood Cemetery in Durban, and is remembered on the 61 Mech Memorial in Johannesburg

His memory will live on.

Update: 07/08/2016.

Because it was his anniversary I asked one of my friends in Durban to visit his grave for me and the rest of Bravo company and see what she could do.

I would also like to dedicate this to Rfn Locke who was badly wounded in the incident.

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 14/07/2016. Updated 07/08/2016

 
Updated: 01/01/2018 — 16:26
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