Tag: Zulu War

Robert Jones VC

Robert Jones (19/08/1857 –  06/09/1898) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at Rorke’s Drift during the Anglo Zulu War in January 1897.

The Citation reads:

“Privates Robert and William Jones were posted in a room of the hospital facing the hill. They kept up a steady fire against enormous odds. While one worked to cut a hole through the partition into the next room, the other shot Zulu after Zulu through the loophooled walls, using his own and his comrade’s rifle alternately as the barrels became too hot to hold from the incessant firing. By their united efforts six out of the seven patients were saved by being carried through the broken partition. The seventh, Sgt. Maxfield, was delirious and refused to be helped. When Robert Jones returned to take the Sergeant to safety by force he found him in his bed being stabbed by the Zulus.”

He is buried in Peterchurch Churchyard, Herefordshire.

DRW 2017-2018. Created 26/02/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. 

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:29

William Wilson Allen VC

William Wilson Allen (1843 –  12/03/1890) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Battle for Rorke’s Drift in January 1879.

The Citation reads:

“On 22 and 23 January 1879 at Rorke’s Drift, Natal, South Africa, Corporal Allan and another man (Frederick Hitch) kept communication with the hospital open, despite being severely wounded. Their determined conduct enabled the patients to be withdrawn from the hospital, and when incapacitated by their wounds from fighting, they continued, as soon as their wounds were dressed, to serve out ammunition to their comrades during the night.”

He is buried in Monmouth Cemetery, Monmouth, Wales. The surname on the grave is given as Allan as opposed to Allen. 

 

DRW © 2017-2018. Created 26/02/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. 

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:30

James Henry Reynolds VC

James Henry Reynolds (03/02/1844 – 04/03/1932) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at Rorke’s Drift during the Zulu War in 1879.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 24734, Page: 3966, reads:

“Army Medical Department, Surgeon – Major James Henry Reynolds.

For the conspicuous bravery, during the attack at Rorke’s Drift on the 22nd and 23rd January, 1879, which he exhibited in his constant attention to the wounded under fire, and in his voluntarily conveying ammunition from the store to the defenders of the Hospital, whereby he exposed himself to a cross-fire from the enemy both in going and returning.”

He is buried in St Mary’s Roman Catholic Church in London. A commemorative plaque was also erected at the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire.  

James Reynolds VC 03/02/1844 -  04/03/1932 St Mary's RC Cem, London

Surg. James Henry Reynolds. VC.

Commemorative plaque for Surgeon James Henry Reynolds. VC. at the NMA..

St Mary’s Roman Catholic Cemetery

 © DRW 2016-2018. Created 16/08/2016, edited 11/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:44

Henry Lysons VC

Henry Lysons (30/07/1858 – 24/07/1907) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Zulu War in 1879.

The citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 25093, Page: 1586,  reads:

“2nd Battalion, The Cameronians, Lieutenant Henry Lysons
[(Scottish Rifles) On 28 March 1879 at the Hlobane Mountain, South Africa, Lieutenant Lysons, with a captain and a private (Edmund John Fowler) dashed forward in advance of the party which had been ordered to dislodge the enemy from a commanding position in natural caves up the mountain. The path was so narrow that they had to advance in single file and the captain who arrived first at the mouth of the cave was instantly killed. Lieutenant Lysons and the private, undeterred by the death of their leader, immediately sprang forward and cleared the enemy out of their stronghold.

Lieutenant Lysons remained at the cave’s mouth for some minutes after the attack, during which time Captain Campbell’s body was carried down the slopes.” 

He is buried in St Peters’s Churchyard, Rodmartin, Gloucs

Henry Lysons VC 30/07/1858 - 24/07/1907 St Peters's Churchyard, Rodmartin, Gloucs

© DRW. 2016-2018 Created 17/04/2016. Image courtesy of Mark Green

Updated: 10/01/2018 — 20:38

Anthony Clarke Booth VC.

Anthony Clarke Booth (21/04/1846 – 08/12/1899) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions  on the Intombe River in  South Africa during the Zulu War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 24814, Page: 832, reads:

“On 12 March 1879 on the Intombe River, South Africa (Zulu War), during an attack by very large numbers of the enemy, Colour-Sergeant Booth rallied a few men on the south bank of the river and covered the retreat of 50 soldiers and others for a distance of three miles. Had it not been for the coolness displayed by this NCO not one man would have escaped. He later achieved the rank of Colour Sergeant.”

He is buried in St Michael’s Churchyard, Brierley Hill, Staffordshire.

Anthony Clarke Booth VC 21/04/1846 - 08/12/1899 Brierley Hill, Staffordshire

Anthony Clarke Booth VC

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 23/09/2015. Image courtesy of Mark Green of Victoriacrossonline.

Updated: 10/01/2018 — 07:56

Lt Teignmouth Melvill and Lt Nevill Coghill

The Memorial to Lt Teignmouth Melvill (08/09/1842 – 22/01/1879) and Lt Nevill Josiah Aylmer Coghill (25/01/1852 – 22/01/1879) at Fugitive’s Drift, below Itchiane Hill. Photograph by Ian Uys. More information on the deaths of these two recipients at Rorke’s Drift may be found at the Rorkes Drift VC Website 

The Memorial to Lt Teignmouth Melvill and Lt Nevill Coghill

The Memorial to Lt Teignmouth Melvill and Lt Nevill Coghill

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 27986, Page: 325, reads:

“Lieutenant Teignmouth Melvill, 24th Foot.

Lieutenant Nevill Josiah Aylmer Coghill, 24th Foot.

Lieutenant Melvill, of the 1st Battalion 24th Foot, on account of the gallant efforts made by him to save the Queen’s Colour of his Regiment after the disaster at Isandlwanha, and also Lieutenant Coghill, 1st Battalion 24th Foot, on account of his heroic conduct in endeavouring to save his brother officer’s life, would have been recommended to Her Majesty for the Victoria Cross had they survived.” 

A further Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 24717, Page: 3178, reads:

“MEMORANDUM.

Lieutenant Melville, of the 1st Battalion 24th Foot, on account of the gallant efforts made by him to save the Queen’s Colour of his Regiment after the disaster at tsandlwanha, and also Lieutenant Coghill, 1st Battalion 24th Foot,-on account of hi& heroic conduct in endeavouring-to save his brother1 officer’s life, would have been recommended to Her Majesty for the Victoria Cross had they survived.”  

After the Zulu massacre at the Battle of Isandhlwana, South Africa, Lieutenant Melvill made a gallant effort to save the Regimental Colours. He and Lieutenant Coghill, who had tried to help, were pursued by Zulu warriors and they experienced great difficulty trying to escape across the swollen River Buffalo. The two officers were overtaken by the Zulus and after a short but gallant struggle the two officers were overpowered and killed. The Regimental Colour, which had gone drifting downstream during the struggle, was retrieved from the River Buffalo 10 days later.

Fugitives Drift Memorial Cross

Fugitives Drift Memorial Cross

Isandhlwana

Panoramic view. (1397×394)

© DRW 2011-2018. Created 04/10/2011. Moved to blog 10/01/2015. Edited 17/05/2017. Image of memorial by Ian Uys, image of cross  http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/, Isandhlwana images by Tony Wood. 

Updated: 08/01/2018 — 08:00

Henry Cecil Dudgeon D’Arcy VC.

Henry Cecil Dudgeon D’Arcy (11/08/1850  – 10/1881) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 3 July 1879 at Ulundi, South Africa during the Zulu War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of ssue: 24769, Page: 5830, reads:

“Frontier Light Horse, Captain (now Commandant) Cecil D’Arcy,

For his gallant conduct on the 3rd July, 1879, during the reconnaissance made before Ulundi by the Mounted Corps, in endeavouring to rescue Trooper Raubenheim of the Frontier Light Horse, who fell from his horse as the troops were retiring. Captain D’Arcy, though the Zulus were close upon them, waited for the man to mount behind him; the horse kicked them both off, and although much hurt by the fall and quite alone, Captain D’Arcy cooly endeavoured to lift the trooper, who was stunned, on to the horse, and it was only when he found that he had not the strength to do so that he mounted and rode off.

His escape was miraculous as the Zulus had actually closed upon him.”

He apparently left the house of Rev. Taberer in the Cape Province where he was staying to recuperate during the night of 6–7 August 1881, and his remains were found early the next year, although reports indicate that he may have faked his own death. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cecil_D%27Arcy). He is buried in a family plot in King Williams Town; Section D, Grave 32-33.

Grave inscription for Capt HCD D'Arcy VC.

Grave inscription for Capt HCD D’Arcy VC.

© DRW 2014 – 2018. Created 07/12/2014. Edited 17/05/2017. Image is courtesy of Terry Cawood 

Updated: 08/01/2018 — 07:51
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