Tag: World War

Prestbury War Memorial

The War Memorial in the village of Prestbury, Gloucestershire may be found at  Google Earth co-ordinates 51.913794°,  -2.042938°. 

The memorial has plaques commemorating men from the village that served in both World Wars. There are a total of 41 names on the memorial and these are available at Remembering.org

The Parish Church of St Mary’s in close to the memorial and there are 5 casualties buried in the churchyard with one private memorial. The church has it’s own war memorial inside it.

The church and memorial are roughly 1 kilometre away from Prestbury Cemetery, that has the Gloucesters Memorial in it, as well as burials from both World Wars.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 04/11/2017

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:15

Durban High School War Memorial

The images of the Durban High School War Memorial are courtesy of Shelly Baker. It may be found at GE co-ordinates -29.844204°, 30.997675°.

The school has existed since 1866 and recently celebrated it’s 150th anniversary. Sadly the Roll of Honour lists so many from the school that perished during the two World Wars as well as the Korean Conflict and the Border War, and one of it’s most famous old boys was Edwin Swales VC.  It is the oldest standing school in Durban and one of the oldest in South Africa.

250 old boys died, and more than 2000 were injured in both World Wars.  The Victoria Cross (VC), 27 Distinguished Flying Crosses (DFC), 21 Military Crosses (MC), 10 Military Medals (MM) and 8 Distinguished Service Orders (DSO) were awarded to old boys in these and subsequent conflicts. In the Battle of Delville Wood in 1916, 12 old boys were killed, 9 wounded and 3 were taken prisoner. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durban_High_School)

The dome was designed by Professor L. Croft, and old boy, and was erected at the Durban High School and Old Boy’s Memorial Trust through the generosity of the late Mrs Lilian Readshaw, a benefactor of the school. Dedicated by the Reverend R. Horrocks, 11 November 1992.

Roll of Honour panels are available on request.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 10/07/2017

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:16

Derelict War Memorial in Springs

Since I first started photographing memorials I have been of the opinion that war memorials on the East Rand are really wasted. The only exception to the rule was the former Brakpan Roll of Honour that was claimed by the Cosy Corner MOTH Shelhole in Brakpan.

The latest in extinct war memorials was found by a correspondent; William Martinson, who kindly sent me images of what is left of what may have been a memorial erected by a MOTH shellhole in Springs.

The clue here is an inscription that is left on the structure.

Naturally I wanted to know more, so have mailed off my contact in the area to see whether he can shed any light on it. There is a Honey tank in Springs and she does not seem to have a a context in the place where she is now (being stripped while nobody is looking), and I could not help wondering if she was not the gate guard from there. I did a blogpost on her recently, and this may be part of the puzzle.

The next question is: just where is this structure. It took me some time but eventually I found it on Google earth.  The co-ordinates are roughly -26.246636°, 28.429237°.

I was very curious about the area that the derelict is in, from GE you can see a large parklike area with lots of trees shaped like a cross. You can see the trees in the image below, the white arrow points to the derelict.

The cemetery can just be seen in the top centre of the image. Historical images on GE date back to 2008 and it appears as if it was a wreck even then. My own thoughts were: “Why build a war memorial there anyway?” From a 2017 perspective it makes no sense, but immediately after the 1st world war it was a totally different story, the memorial being erected in the 1930’s. The other derelict war memorial in Springs pretty much sums it up.  A change in demographics, less money for maintenance and more for mercs, a culture of neglect for history and the never ending quest to cut costs so that the suits will have more to spend on salary increases in spite of them never earning one in the first place. 

Many years ago the MOTH was a thriving organisation, with shellholes in most cities, but the decline in their membership, and a policy of declining former national servicemen membership really put the nail in the coffin. Witness the closure of the former headquarters in Johannesburg and the abandonment of the war memorial in “Remembrance Square”

Whatever the reason for the state of this structure, had the inscription not remained it would really have been worth ignoring, but the words “Mutual Help, Comradeship and Sound Memory” really are a farce in this case.

My thanks must go to William Martinson for his images. He also sent me a link to the Artefacts site that has an entry on the  memorial.  The link also provides an answer to the cross shaped trees in Olympia Park. It is a pity that no images have surfaced that could show how this structure looked when it was originally inaugurated, perhaps the answer is in the local library in Springs? assuming one exists in the first place. 

I am hoping that somebody will be able to add to the history of the structure. If you do have any information I would love to hear from you. 

Update 07/07/2017

My contact had the following to say: “I managed to track down that this structure was a cenotaph and garden of remembrance for the Springs Dugout of the MOTHs during the early 30s. There are no longer any Shellholes in Springs. The last one to close was Mudhook which was situated diagonally across the road of the new Springs Civic Centre. The Shellholes in Spings were Mudhook, Black Cat and Seven Seas. We have the Bell from Seven Seas Shellhole at Cosy Corner,  There are supposedly two field guns standing close to the public swimming pool that used to stand next to the wall of Remembrance,I will make a plan and go and check it out. The park as far as I know is called Olympia Park.”

The monument also featured in an article about illegal dumping in the Springs Advertiser of 6 August 2015.

So there we have it in a nutshell. The MOTH shellholes closed down and the memorial was left behind. The field guns? who knows. I have not forgotten this memorial though and will keep an eye open. Somewhere out there must be an image of some information. 

© DRW 2017-2018, created 02/07/2017, updated 07/07/2017, 18/07/2017

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:17

Hollybrook Memorial: Southampton

The Hollybrook Memorial in Hollybrook Cemetery in Southampton, commemorates by name almost 1,900 servicemen and women of the Commonwealth land and air forces* whose graves are not known, many of whom were lost in transports or other vessels torpedoed or mined in home waters (*Officers and men of the Commonwealth’s navies who have no grave but the sea are commemorated on memorials elsewhere). The memorial also bears the names of those who were lost or buried at sea, or who died at home but whose bodies could not be recovered for burial. Almost one third of the names on the memorial are those of officers and men of the South African Native Labour Corps, who died when the troop transport Mendi sank in the Channel following a collision on 21 February 1917. (Text from Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Memorial at Hollybrook Cemetery in Southampton

Memorial at Hollybrook Cemetery in Southampton

The memorial makes for very sombre reading, especially when you consider that this is probably one of the only places where so many of these people are remembered. It covers both World Wars (there is also a dedicated WW2 plot in the Cemetery), and the highest ranking person on the memorial is Field Marshall Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, who died when the battle cruiser HMS Hampshire was mined and sunk off Scapa Flow on 5 June 1916, he is mentioned on plaque 01.

Mendi Corner

Mendi Corner (1497×752)

The Men of the Mendi are listed on plaques 3-19. Other ships of interest are the Union Castle ships Glenart and Galway Castle.

There are over 100 plaques on the memorial, testifying once again to the magnitude of the loss of life during the Two World Wars. It is a very thought provoking memorial, and a very special one to me as this is where the Mendi Men are remembered.

© DRW 2013-2018. Created 14/05/2016

Updated: 10/01/2018 — 20:21

Gloucester War Memorial


The Gloucester War Memorial is situated on a corner at the entrance to Gloucester Park and may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates  51°51’36.29″N,   2°14’29.40″W.

The plinth is topped with the familiar emblem of the Sphinx that is also found on the badge of the Gloucester Regiment.

The list of names on the memorial may be found at Glosgen –  Gloucester Genealogy.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 30/08/2015.

Updated: 26/08/2018 — 19:57

Gloucestershire Royal Hussars Memorial

The memorial to the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars may be found in the parking lot of Gloucester Cathedral. It features a cross on a  many sided base which has bronze reliefs depicting various actions by the Hussars and Yeomanry during both World Wars.

 

The memorial may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates  51°52’3.50″N,   2°14’53.01″W. The chapel in the cathedral may be found very close to the effigies of King Edward II and Osric, Prince of Mercia. It features stained glass windows dedicated to the memory of members of the Gloucestershire Regiment as well as the memory of the crew of HMS Gloucester who lost their lives off Crete on 22 May 1941.

The Chapel also has 4 Rolls of Honour that hold the names of the men involved in the conflicts.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 30/08/2015

Updated: 26/08/2018 — 19:57

Cheltenham War Memorial

Cheltenham’s War Memorial is located outside the Municipal Offices on the Promenade, with the Long Gardens on either side. It was not an easy one to photograph either, as it is partly in shade and partly in sunlight.

It was unveiled by Maj-Genl Sir Robert Fanshaw K.C.B, D.S.O, on the 1st of October 1921.

Google Earth co-ordinates are:   51°53’56.69″N,   2° 4’39.35″W

The memorial also has plaques dedicated to those who lost their lives in South Arabia 1839-1967, as well as to Polish men and women who lost their lies in the Second World War.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 04/07/2015, more images added 17/05/2017

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:28

Tewkesbury War Memorial

The War Memorial in Tewkesbury is situated on an island that sits at the intersection of Barton Str, Church Str,  and High Street. Google Earth co-ordinates are 51°59’32.75″N,   2° 9’27.29″W.

This position also makes it very difficult to photograph because of all the traffic going past (and it never seems to stop). It is also very vulnerable to any vehicle that misses the turning, although I have no statistics as to how many times it has been hit. (2010 a vehicle collided with it).

The memorial is also known as the Tewkesbury Cross and is described as: “A tapered octagonal shaft with moulded capital and a cross, on an octagonal plinth cut  through by a square base with diagonal buttresses at centres of the sides, carrying 4 pinnacles. All set on a broad 3-step hexagonal base, the lowest step with nosing, on a final hexagonal platform which has been rounded, and protected by 6 stone bollards. The cross carries a central shield of arms, and the base has a series of 6 bronze plates with the names of the fallen inscribed, dated 1914-1919 (sic). A further plate has been added covering the years 1939-1945.” (http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-376922-war-memorial-tewkesbury-gloucestershire#.VYWwmmerP5I)

On 01/07/2018, two additional plaques were added to the memorial for the two world wars. 

World War One

World War Two

Roll of Honour.

1914-1918
E. Andrews : A. H. Askew : C. Attwood : C. Bailey :
T. Ball :  W. Ball :  P. Barnes :  W.J. Barnfield :
W.H. Bastable :  T. Beesley :  W.F. Birt : T. Bishop :
H.N. Bloxham : J. Broadwell : A.L. Brookes :
R. Clarke : A. Cleal : F.C. Clements : J. Cole :
J. Coleman : R.N. Coleman : F.J. Collins :
J. Cook : J.H. Cook : A. Coopey :  A.H. Cornish :
J.S. Dale :  C.L. Davey : S. Davies : A.C. Day : R. Day :
W.A. Day : F. Dee : B. Devereux : L.F. Devereux :
F. Dickinson : A.J. Didcote : H.F. Didcote :
W.B. Didcote : G. Eagles : T.J. Evans : W. Fitton ;
A.J. Fletcher : Pte. C. E. Garratt : F.N. Green :
W.C. Green : H.A. Greening : J. Greening :
L. Gurney : F.E. Hale : R. Hall : T. Hall :
T. Harrington : A. Harrison : S. Hathaway :
F. Hawker : P.C. Hawker :  W. Hawker : A.G. Hodges :
W. Hodges : A.E. Hooper : T.J. Horne :  C. Howell :
C. Hurcombe : H. Hurcombe : D.R. Hutchinson :
H.W. Hyett : J. Jeynes : A.L. Jones : G.H. Jones :
J.L. Jones : L. Jones : P.H. Jones : W. Jones :
W.H. Jones : A. Jordan : A.E. Jordan :
W. Keylock : W. King : G. Mann : L.V. Mann :
N.J. Mann :  J. Matty : F. Mayall : L.W. Moore :
T.H. Moore : F. Neale : T. New : C. Newman :
T.J. Osborne : A.C. Papps : W.J.M. Parker :
J.J. Parnell : T. Parrott : J. Parsons :
F. Perkins : W.W. Pitman : H. Preston : F. T. Price :
W.A. Price : W.H. Price : D.L. Priestley :
S.N. Priestley : W.J. Prosser : A.C. Purser :
F.T. Raggatt : A.E. Reynolds : C.W.M. Rice :
E. Rice : W. Roberts : A.H. Rowley : H.E. Rowley :
H.G. Rowley : A.C. Sallis : A.F. Sallis : A.J. Sallis :
C. Sandford : R.C. Sayers : W. Sheldon :
J.A. Simms : T. Simmons :  C. Simons : E.W. Simons :
A.E. Sircombe : A. Smith : H.G. Stubbs : R.B. Sweet :
A.G. Taylor : C. Taylor : F. Taylor : G.H. Taylor :
R.J.W. Taylor : H. Thompson : J.W. Timms : L. Tysoe :
G. Turberville : T. Underwood : C.W. Wagstaff :
J. Wagstaff : J. Walker : A.W. Wallace : H. Warner :
H.J. Waylen : A.C. Wilkinson : F. Wilkinson :
B. Williams : E. Williams : R. Williams :
T. Williams : C. Wise : A. Woodhull :  F. Woolcott :

Additional 1914-1918 casualties added on 02/08/2018.

A.E. Fletcher :  F. Green :  F.G. Green :
H Knight :  V.W. Marment : 
 P. L. Marment : A.J.E. Parsons :  
L. Rossell : K. Sollis :  F.W. Taylor :

1939-1945

A. Allan :  L. Barrett :  J. Bassett : A. Bishop : W. Booth : B. Dee :
C. Gough : H.F.E. Gyngell : H.S. Halling : R. Haynes : A.J. Howes :
E.S. Hunt : E. Hyett :  F.J. Jenkins : C.F. Key : F. Key : K.S. Nash :
L.H.J. Osborne : E. Page : A.J. Parker : W.E. Portlock : 
H.O.D. Ricketts : C. Ryland : J. Shephard : V. Turberville :
G. Ashton :  E. Bostock : R. Dickenson : G.W Gregson : A. Martin : 

Additional 1939-1945 casualties added on 02/08/2018

J.C. Cash : R.E.. Collett
A. Hanlon : W.F. Portlock

In honour of those who gave their lives in the service of their country other conflicts:

B.D. Soden. Northern Ireland 1972

 

There is also a very impressive World War One Memorial in nearby Tewkesbury Abbey.

And in the neighbouring parish of Ashchurch there is another War Memorial.

Ashchurch War Memorial

DRW ©  2015 – 2018. Created 20/06/2015, added new names and plaques 01/07/2018

Updated: 02/07/2018 — 19:54
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