Tag: VC

Sir William Babtie VC, KCB, KCMG.

William Babtie (07/05/1859 –  11/09/1920) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions while serving in the Royal Army Medical Corps, during the Anglo Boer War on 15 December 1899 at the Battle of Colenso.

(59) William Babtie VC.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 27184, Page: 2547, reads:

“Royal Army Medical Corps, Major William Babtie, C.M.G.

At Colenso, on the l0th December, 1899, the wounded of the 14th and 66th Batteries, Royal Field Artillery, were lying in an advanced donga close in the rear of the guns without any Medical Officer to attend to them, and when a message was sent back asking for assistance, Major W. Babtie, R A.M.C., rode up under a heavy rifle fire, his pony being hit three times. “When he arrived at the donga, where the wounded were lying in sheltered corners, he attended to them all, going from place to place exposed to the heavy rifle fire which greeted anyone who showed himself.

Later on in the day, Major Babtie went out with Captain Congreve to bring in Lieutenant Roberts, who was lying wounded on the veldt. This also was under a heavy fire.”

He died at Knocke, Belgium, on 11 September 1920, aged 61 and was buried in Stoke Cemetery, Guildford, Surrey. He is commemorated by a plaque at the National Memorial Arboretum.

Maj William Babtie. VC.

©  DRW 2017. Created 08/06/2017. Taddy cigarette card by Card Promotions © 1997, first issued 1902

Updated: 20/06/2017 — 06:00

Charles Fitzclarence VC

Charles Fitzclarence (08/05/1865 – 02/11/1914) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Anglo Boer War while serving in The Royal Fusiliers.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of 6 July 1900, Issue: 27208, Page: 4196, reads:

“The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), Captain Charles FitzCIarence.

On the 14th October, 1899, Captain FitzCIarence went with his squadron of the Protectorate Regiment, consisting of only partially trained men, who had never been in action, to the assistance of an armoured train which had gone out from Mafeking. The enemy were in greatly superior numbers, and the squadron was for a time surrounded, and it looked as if nothing could save them from being shot down. Captain FitzCIarence, however, by his personal coolness and courage inspired the greatest confidence in his men, and, by his bold and efficient handling of them, not only succeeded in relieving the armoured train, but inflicted a heavy defeat on the Boers, who lost 50 killed and a large number wounded, his own losses being 2 killed and 15 wounded. The moral effect of this blow had a very important bearing on subsequent encounters with the Boers.

On the 27th October, 1899, Captain FitzCIarence led his squadron from Mafeking across the open, and made a night attack with the bayonet on one of the enemy’s trenches. A hand-to-hand fight took place in the trench, while a heavy fire was concentrated on it from the rear. The enemy was driven out with heavy loss. Captain’ FitzCIarence was the first man into the position and accounted for four of the enemy with his sword. The British lost & killed and 9 wounded. Captain. FitzCIarence was himself: slightly wounded. With reference to these two actions, Major. General Baden-Powell states that had this Officer not shown an extraordinary spirit and fearlessness the attacks would have been failures, and we should have suffered heavy loss both in men and prestige. On the 26th December, 1899, during the action at Game Tree, near Mafeking, Captain FitzCIarence again distinguished himself by his coolness and courage and was again wounded (severely through both legs).” 

He was killed in action, aged 49, at Polygon Wood, Zonnebeke, Belgium, on 12 November 1914 whilst commanding the 1st Guards Brigade. He has no known grave and is Commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Panel 3.

Menin Gate. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

 © DRW 2017. Created 30/04/2017. Inscription image courtesy of Mark Green. Taddy & Co cigarette card by Card Promotions, ©1997, first issued 1902. 

Updated: 20/06/2017 — 06:02

Patrick Joseph Bugden VC

Patrick Joseph Bugden (17/03/1897 – 28/09/1917) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at the Battle of Polygon Wood, during the Passchendaele Offensive from 26 September to 28 September 1917.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 30400 Page: 12329 reads: 

“For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty when, on two occasions, our advance was temporarily held up by strongly defended “pill boxes”. Private Bugden, in the face of devastating fire from machine guns, gallantly led small parties to attack these strong points, and, successfully silencing the machine guns with bombs, captured the garrison at the point of the bayonet. On another occasion, when a Corporal, who had become detached from his company, had been captured and was being taken to the rear by the enemy, Private Bugden, single handed, rushed to the rescue of his comrade, shot one enemy, and bayonetted the remaining two, thus releasing the Corporal. On five occasions, he rescued wounded men under intense shell and machine gun fire, showing an utter contempt and disregard for danger. Always foremost in volunteering for any dangerous mission, it was during the execution of one of these missions that this gallant soldier was killed”

He is buried in Hooge Crater Cemetery, Zillebeke, Belgium.

© DRW 2017. Created 26/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green.

Updated: 26/04/2017 — 18:58

John Joseph Sims VC

John Joseph Sims (1835 – 06/12/1881) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions following the assault on the Redan on 18 June 1855 during the Crimean War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 659, reads:

“On the 18th June 1855, after his Regiment had retreated back to their trenches following the assault on the Redan, he went out into the open ground, under heavy fire, in broad daylight, and brought in wounded soldiers outside the trenches.”   

Sims died on 6 December 1881, aged 46 in the Union Workhouse, Thavies Inn, City of London from tuberculosis, and was buried in common ground in the City of London Cemetery, Manor Park. On Friday, 11th April 2003, a memorial plaque was placed over the location of his grave. 

© DRW 2017. Created 21/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. 

Updated: 24/04/2017 — 12:33

John Franks Vallentin VC.

John Franks Vallentin (14/05/1882 – 07/11/1914) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the first Battle of Ypres.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of  Supplement: 29074, Page: 1700, reads:

“Captain John Franks Vallentin, 1st Battalion, The South Staffordshire Regiment.

For conspicuous bravery on 7th November at Zillebeke. When leading the attack against the Germans under a very hea\y fire he was struck down, and on rising to continue the attack was immediately killed.

The capture of the enemy’s trenches Which followed was in a great measure due to the confidence which the men had in their Captain, arising from his many previous acts of great bravery and ability.”

 

He has no known grave and is commemorated at The Menin Gate Ypres Memorial. Panel 35.

Menin Gate. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

 © DRW 2017. Created 02/03/2017. Inscription image courtesy of Mark Green. 

Updated: 30/04/2017 — 07:51

Eric Norman Frankland Bell VC

Eric Norman Frankland Bell (28/08/1895 – 01/07/1916) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions in Thiepval, France on 1 July 1916.  

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29765, Page: 9417, reads:

“Temp. Capt. Eric Norman Frankland Bell, late R. Innis. Fus.

For most conspicuous bravery. He was in command of a Trench Mortar Battery, and advanced with the infantry in the attack. When our front line was hung up by enfilading machine gun fire Captain Bell crept forward and shot the machine gunner.

Later, on no less than three occasions, when our bombing parties, which were clearing the enemy’s trenches, were unable to advance, he went forward alone and threw Trench Mortar bombs among the enemy. When he had no more, bombs available he stood on the parapet, under intense fire, and used a rifle with great coolness and effect on the enemy advancing to counter-attack.

Finally he was killed rallying and reorganising infantry parties which had lost their officers.

All this was outside the scope of his normal duties with his battery. He gave his life in his supreme devotion to duty. “

 

He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing in the Somme in France.  Pier and Face 4D/5B

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

© DRW 2017. Created 01/03/2017. 

Updated: 02/05/2017 — 06:30

William Frederick “Billy” McFadzean VC

William Frederick “Billy” McFadzean VC (09/10/1895 – 01/07/1916) was awarded the Victoria Cross  during the Battle of the Somme near Thiepval Wood, France.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29740, Page: 8871, reads:

“No. 14/18278 Pte. William Frederick McFadzean, late R. Ir. Rif.

For most conspicuous bravery. While in a concentration trench and opening a box of bombs for distribution prior to an attack, the box slipped down into the trench, which was crowded with men, and two of the safety pins fell out. Private McFadzean, instantly realising the danger to his comrades, with heroic courage threw himself on the top of the Bombs.

The bombs exploded blowing him to pieces, but only one other man was injured. He well knew his danger, being himself a bomber, but without a moment’s hesitation he gave his life for his comrades.”

He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing in the Somme in France. Pier 15, Face A/B

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

© DRW 2017. Created 01/03/2017. Commemoration Image courtesy of Mark Green, Gallaher cigarette card first issued 1917, reproduced by Card Promotions © 2003

Updated: 22/10/2017 — 18:25

Geoffrey St George Shillington Cather VC

Geoffrey St George Shillington Cather (11/10/1890 – 02/07/1916) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 1 July 1916 near Hamel, France.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29740, Page: 8869, reads:

” Temp. Lt. Geoffrey St. George Shillington Cather, late K. Ir. Fus.

For most conspicuous bravery. From 7 p.m. till midnight he searched “No Man’s-Land,” and brought in three wounded men. Next morning at 8 a.m. he continued his search, brought in another wounded man, and gave water to others, arranging for their rescue later. Finally, at 10.30 a.m., he took out water to another man, and was proceeding further on when he was himself killed. All this was carried out in full view of the enemy, and under direct machine gun fire and intermittent artillery fire.

He set’a splendid example of courage and self-sacrifice.”

 

He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing in the Somme in France. Pier 13, Face A-B

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

© DRW 2017. Created 01/03/2017. Commemoration Image courtesy of Mark Green,  Gallaher cigarette card first released 1917, reproduced by Card Creations © 2003

Updated: 22/10/2017 — 18:15

Thomas Orde Lawder Wilkinson VC

Thomas Orde Lawder Wilkinson (29/06/1894 – 05/07/1916) Was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at La Boiselle, France during the First World War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29765, Page: 9418, reads:

“Temp. Lt. Thomas Orda Lawder Wilkinson, late N. Lan. R.

For most conspicuous bravery. During an attack, when a party of another unit was retiring without their machine gun, Lieutenant Wilkinson rushed forward and, with two of his men, got the gun into action, and held up the enemy till they were relieved.

Later, when the advance was checked during a bombing attack, he forced his way forward and found four or five men of different units stopped by a solid block of earth, over which the enemy was throwing bombs.

With great pluck and promptness he mounted a machine gun on the top of the parapet and dispersed the enemy bombers. Subsequently he made two most gallant attempts to bring in a wounded man, but the second attempt he was shot through the heart just before reaching the man.

Throughout the day he set a magnificent example of courage and self-sacrifice. “

His body was not recovered and he has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing in the Somme in France, Pier 11, Face A.

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

© DRW 2017. Created 01/03/2017. Commemoration Image courtesy of Mark Green,  Gallaher cigarette card first issued 1917, reproduced by Card Creations © 2003

Updated: 22/10/2017 — 18:10

William Mariner VC

William Mariner (29/05/1882 – 01/07/1916) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the First World War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of: Supplement: 29202, Page: 6116, reads: 

“No. 2052 Private William Mariner, 2nd Battalion, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps,

During a violent thunderstorm on the night of 22nd May, 1915, he left his trench near Cambrin, and crept out through the German wire entanglements till he reached the emplacement of a German machine gun which had been damaging our parapets and hindering our working parties.

After climbing on the top of the German parapet he threw a bomb in under the roof of the gun emplacement and- heard some groaning and the enemy running away. After about a quarter of an hour he heard some of them coming back again, and climbed up on the other side of the emplacement and threw another bomb among them left-handed. He then lay still while the Germans opened a heavy fire on the wire entanglement behind him, and it was only after about an hour that he was able to crawl back to his own trench.

Before starting out he had requested a serjeant to open fire on the enemy’s trenches as soon as he had thrown his bombs. Rifleman Mariner was out alone for one and a half hours carrying out this gallant work.

He went missing during The Battle of the Somme, and is presumed to been killed in action in France on 1 July 1916.  His name is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing in the Somme in France. Pier 13, Face A-B

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

© DRW 2017. Created 01/03/2017. Commemoration Image courtesy of Mark Green, Cigarette card by Card Promotions © 2001, first issued 1915. 

Updated: 31/05/2017 — 06:11
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