Tag: Royal Army Medical Corps

George Allan Maling. VC

George Allan Maling (6/10/1888 – 9/07/1929), was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions while serving with the 12th Battalion, The Rifle Brigade (Prince Consort’s Own) 

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29371,  Page: 11448, reads: 

Temporary Lieutenant George Allan Maling, M.B., Royal Army Medical Corps.

For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty during the heavy fighting near Fauquissart on 25th September, 1915.

 Lieutenant Maling worked incessantly with untiring energy from 6.15 a.m. on the 25th till 8 a.m. on the 26th, collecting and treating in the open under heavy shell fire more than 300 men. At about 11 a.m. on the 25th he was flung down and temporarily stunned by the bursting of a large high explosive shell, which wounded his only assistant and killed several of his patients. A second shell soon after covered him and his instruments with debris, but his high courage and zeal never failed him and he continued his gallant work single-handed.

He died on 9 July 1929, at the age of 40, after suffering from pleurisy. He is buried in Chislehurst Cemetery,  Chislehurst, Kent. Section A, Grave 2017, and is commemorated with a plaque at the National Memorial Arboretum. 

Capt. George Allan Maling. VC.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 12/07/2017. Gallaher cigarette card by Card Promotions, © 2001, first issued 1916

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:16

Edgar Thomas Inkson VC, DSO

Edgar Thomas Inkson (05/04/1872 – 19/02/1947) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Boer War while serving as a lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps, attached to The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers on 24 February 1900, at Hart’s Hill, Colenso.

The Citation, recorded in the Edinburgh Gazette of Issue: 11268, Page: 85,  reads:

“Royal Army Medical Corps, Lieutenant E. T. Inkson.
On the 24ih February 1900, Lieutenant Inkson carried Second Lieutenant Devenish (who was severely wounded  and unable to walk) for three or four hundred yards under n very heavy fire to a place of safety. The ground over which Lieutenant Inkson had to move was much exposed, there being no cover available.”

He died on 19th February 1947, aged 74 at St Richard’s Hospital, Chichester, Sussex, and he was cremated at Woking Crematorium, and his ashes were interred in Brookwood Cemetery. 

A plaque, commemorating his bravery may be found at the National Memorial Arboretum.

Lt. Edgar Thomas Inkson. VC.

DRW ©  2017-2018. Created 12/06/2017. Taddy cigarette card by Card Promotions © 1997, first issued 1902. Grave image courtesy of Mark Green

Updated: 10/08/2018 — 05:22

Arthur Martin-Leake VC*

Arthur Martin-Leake (04/04/1874 – 22/06/1953) is one of three men who were awarded the Victoria Cross twice. 

While attached to the 5th Field Ambulance during the Second Boer War on 8 February 1902,  he was awarded his first VC for his actions at Vlakfontein,

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 27433, Page: 3176, reads:

“South African Constabulary, Surgeon-Captain A. Martin-Leake.

During the action at Vlakfonteiu, on the 8th February, 1902, Surgeon-Captain Martin-Leake went up to a wounded man, and attended to him under a heavy fire from about 40 Boers at 100 yards range. He then went to the assistance of a wounded Officer, and, whilst trying to place him in a comfortable position, was shot three times, but would not give in till he rolled over thoroughly exhausted. All the eight men at this point were wounded, and while they were lying on the Veldt, Surgeon-Captain Martin-Leake refused water till every one else had been served. “

He returned to service as a lieutenant with the 5th Field Ambulance when the First World War broke out.

He was awarded his second Victoria Cross during the period 29 October to 8 November 1914 near Zonnebeke, Belgium, whilst serving with the Royal Army Medical Corps.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29074, Page: 1700 reads: 

“Lieutenant Arthur Martin Leake, Royal Army Medical Corps, who was awarded the Victoria Cross on 13th May, 1902, is granted, a Clasp for conspicuous bravery in the present, campaign: — For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty throughout the campaign, especially during the period 29th October to 8th November 1914, near Zonnebeke, in rescuing, whilst exposed to constant fire, a large number of the wounded who were lying close to the enemy’s trenches.”

He retired from the army after the war and resumed his employment in India until he retired to England in 1937.  He died, aged 79, at High Cross, Hertfordshire and was buried in St John’s Church, High Cross. 

Commemoration plaque at the National Memorial Arboretum

There is a Memorial to Arthur Martin-Leake VC  and Cmdnt Gert Martinus Claassen at the farm Syferfontein. 

The Image of the Syferfontein monuments by user “Valhotel”, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Martin-Leake.  created 11/09/2013, (CC BY-SA 4.0)  

Cropped Image of the Syferfontein image by user “Valhotel”, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Martin-Leake.  created 11/09/2013, (CC BY-SA 4.0) 

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 07/06/2017. Taddy cigarette by Card Promotions, © 1997, first issued 1902. Gallaher cigarette card by Card Promotions © 2001, first issued 1915. 

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:19

Noel Godfrey Chavasse VC*, MC

Noel Godfrey Chavasse (09/11/1884 – 04/08/1917) was first awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 9 August 1916, at Guillemont, France when he attended to the wounded all day under heavy fire.

Reproduction Gallaher cigarette card.

The Citation, Recorded in the London Gazette, issue 29802,  page 10394,  24 October 1916 reads: 

“Captain Noel Godfrey Chavasse, M.C., M.B., Royal Army Medical Corps.

For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty.

During an attack he tended the wounded in the open all day, under heavy fire, frequently in view of the enemy. During the ensuing night he searched for wounded on the ground in front of the enemy’s lines for four hours.

Next day he took one stretcher-bearer to the advanced trenches, and under heavy shell fire carried an urgent case for 500 yards into safety, being wounded in the side by a shell splinter during the journey. The same night he took up a party of twenty volunteers, rescued three wounded men from a shell hole twenty-five yards from the enemy’s trench, buried the bodies of two officers, and collected many identity discs, although fired on by bombs and machine guns.

Altogether he saved the lives of some twenty badly wounded men, besides the ordinary cases which passed through his hands. His courage and self-sacrifice, were beyond praise.”

He was awarded the  Bar to his Victoria Cross for his actions from 31 July to 2 August 1917, at Wieltje, Belgium.

The Citation, recorded in the  London Gazette, issue 30284, page 9531,  14 September 1917 reads:

“His Majesty the KING has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of a Bar to the Victoria Cross to Capt. Noel Godfrey Chavasse, V.C., M.C., late R.A.M.C., attd. L’pool R.

For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty when in action.

Though severely wounded early in the action whilst carrying a wounded soldier to the Dressing Station, Capt. Chavasse refused to leave his post, and for two days not only continued to perform his duties, but in addition went out repeatedly under heavy fire to search for and attend to the wounded who were lying out.

During these searches, although practically without food during this period, worn with fatigue and faint with his wound, he assisted to carry in a number of badly wounded men, over heavy and difficult ground.

By his extraordinary energy and inspiring example, he was instrumental in rescuing many wounded who would have otherwise undoubtedly succumbed under the bad weather conditions.

This devoted and gallant officer subsequently died of his wounds.”

Captain Noel Chavasse died of his wounds in Brandhoek and is buried at Brandhoek New Military Cemetery, Vlamertinge, Belgium. 

He is the only man to be awarded the Victoria Cross and Bar in the First World War.

In Liverpool, at Abercromby Square, there is a a statue called “Liverpool Heroes” that features Noel Chavasse as its main focus.

He is also commemorated with a bust in Liverpool Cathedral. His father, Francis Chavasse was very instrumental in the building of the Anglican Cathedral in Liverpool. The Roll of Honour is also opened on the entry for his name.

Liverpool also has a Chavasse Park in the Liverpool One shopping complex. It is not easy to find a name board unless you know where to look. I was fortunate that I found somebody that was able to assist me in finding the board.

There is a commemorative plaque to him at the National Memorial Arboretum.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 23/04/2017. Grave image courtesy of Mark Green. Cigarette card reproduction by Card Promotions © 2003. Added Liverpool references 07/06/2018.

Updated: 20/06/2018 — 19:58
Blogging while allatsea © 1999-2019. All photographs are copyright to DR Walker or the relevant photographer. Frontier Theme