Tag: Roll of Honour

Sedgeberrow War Memorial

Sedgeberrow is a  village  and civil parish in the Wychavon district of Worcestershire, England, about 4.8 km south of Evesham. I first  spotted the war memorial from the bus en route to Evesham and in early November 2018 made a trip to photograph it.  

The memorial is next to the church of “St Mary the Virgin” and may be found at 52.045395°,  -1.965749° and it really comprises 2 entities:  A Crucifix, described as “Crucifix in stone under a canopy set on three steps. The inscription is on the risers of the steps.”

On the exterior wall of the church is affixed another plaque, and it is dedicated to those who served in The First World War. If I read it correctly there are 3 sets of brothers on the two memorials, although that would require additional research. 

Unfortunately I was not able to access the church to see whether there were any memorials within it, and there are no formal CWGC graves in the churchyard.

DRW © 2018. Created 06/11/2018

Updated: 02/03/2019 — 05:04

Kemerton War Memorial

Kemerton is a small village in a string of villages between Tewkesbury and Evesham. I visited the village to photograph the memorial on 20/10/2018.

The War Memorial is described as a “Latin Limestone Cross atop a tall shaft, which is on a 5 stage base. The design of the cross was adapted from an ancient village cross in the village of Laycock.” (https://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorial/32460). It was unveiled on 9 January 1921, and was made by Sir Herbert Baker RA (possibly the architect?), Messrs E T Taylor of Tewkesbury and Mr A Stanley of Kemerton. It is a Grade II listed structure. 

There are 20 names from the First World War and 7 from the Second World War on the memorial.

The memorial may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates: 52.033202°,  -2.079959°.

DRW 2018. Created 24/10/2018

Updated: 02/03/2019 — 05:05

Ashton-Under-Hill War Memorial

Ashton-Under-Hill is a small village between Tewkesbury and Evesham, and is one of a string of villages that I visited on 20/10/2018. The War Memorial is described as “Cross, with laurel wreath wrapped round the shaft, on a stepped square base,” it has 8 names from the First World War and 2 from the second. (https://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorial/52116)

The main inscription is as follows:

On each side there are additional inscriptions, and I suspect the World War 1 names may have been added at a later date.

Guy Lea is buried in the nearby churchyard of St Barbara’s Church.

The church has three private memorials and a framed Roll of Honour mounted on a wall inside:

(RAF Memorial text recreated because of reflections)

The War Memorial may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates:  52.039634°,  -2.005106°

DRW © 2018. Created 23/10/2018

Updated: 02/03/2019 — 05:04

Swindon Railway Works Plaques

The plaques in this post were photographed at Steam. Museum of the Great Western Railroad that I visited in 2015. Unfortunately my images did not come out well, it really has to do with camera shake and long exposures associated with not using a flash. I have sharpened them as much as possible. 

The Great Western Railway had it’s engine works in this railway town, and even built housing for its workers there, it was the biggest employer too and the Museum tells the story of the men and women who built, operated and travelled on the Great Western Railway. In wartime the works would have played a major part in maintaining the steam engines and in some cases using their heavy industrial facilities for wartime production. The labour force of men would have been affected by volunteering and conscription, and women began to play a role in keeping the works running. The carnage of the Western Front would have also affected the men who worked here, and a number of plaques have survived, commemorating those who never returned.​

 

DRW © 2015-2018. Created 27/08/2018

Updated: 02/03/2019 — 05:05

Liverpool Exchange War Memorials

There are two war memorials in the open square behind the Liverpool City Hall that is bounded by a large building that seems to have been called “Exchange Flags” but is now called Horton House and Walker House.

The first memorial was dedicated to “the Men of the Liverpool Exchange Newsroom”

Funded by donations raised from members of the Liverpool Exchange Company in 1916 and originally intended to be dedicated to those members who had joined the forces, the emphasis of the memorial changed at the end of WW1 to commemorate members and sons who had sacrificed their lives. Made of bronze and marble by artist Joseph Phillips, the sculpture features Britannia sheltering a young girl with two soldiers and a sailor looking outwards while  a Queen Mary Auxiliary Services nurse tends a wounded soldier.

Unveiled in 1924, the sculpture was moved to its current location in 1953. (https://www.cultureliverpool.co.uk/memorials-memories/)

The names are listed on the stonework next to the central dedication panel.

Above the memorial on two columns on either side of it are 4 figures: a female adult with a young boy and a male adult with a young girl. I do not know whether these are part of the original memorial or not.

The Exchange Flags square may be found at Google Earth  53.407654°,  -2.992094° 

The second memorial is in visual range and is The Unknown Soldier, Liverpool Cotton Association Memorial.

Unusually the bronze soldier stands at ground level  having been relocated in 2013 to be closer the ICA’s new office in Walker House.

Commissioned in 1922 by the International Cotton Association (ICA), known then as the Liverpool Cotton Association, the bronze statue of the Unknown Soldier was originally situated in Liverpool’s Cotton Exchange Building on Old Hall Street. (https://www.cultureliverpool.co.uk/memorials-memories/)

There is one further memorial in the square which is neither a First or Second World War Memorial. It is known as the Nelson Monument  and it  is really a monument to Admiral Horatio Nelson.

It is somewhat of a wedding cake of a monument, with  four statues depicting prisoners sitting in poses of sadness and representing Nelson’s major victories, the battles of Cape St Vincent, the Nile, Copenhagen, and Trafalgar.

The first stone was laid on 15 July 1812, and the monument was unveiled on 21 October 1813, the eighth anniversary of Nelson’s death. In 1866 the monument was moved to its present site in Exchange Flags to allow for an extension to the Exchange Buildings.

DRW © 2018. Created 10/06/2018

Updated: 17/07/2018 — 06:11

Ashchurch War Memorial (Tewkesbury)

When I moved to Tewkesbury in 2015 it was inevitable that my camera lens would be on the lookout for churches, cemeteries and war memorials. The Parish Church of St Nicholas  in the village of Ashchurch being the one church closest to where I was living at the time.  I made two visits to the church and once I had done those I put it out of my mind and concentrated on other things. However, I was unaware that there was a war memorial associated with Ashchurch and this past week I realised that I had missed out. 

St Nicholas Parish Church

The War Memorial may be found on Google Earth at  51.997611°,  -2.105686°.  and it is not too difficult to find it, you literally follow the cycle path until you find St Nicholas church, then cross the road and there you are. 

The war memorial may be described as a “Cross with ‘roof’ ends on top and each arm, set on capital on top of square tapered column on three step base”.  (http://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorial/20772)

Remembrance Day was almost 2 months ago  and there are still wreaths at the memorial. The main inscription reads:

There are three panels with names from both World Wars, 24 from the First World War and two from the 2nd. It will be interesting to see how many of them are buried in the graveyard of St Nicholas Church just over the road. I do know that there is a memorial to Major Bertram Cartland in the grounds of Tewkesbury Abbey. 

Alternatively the names on the memorial may be seen at http://www.glosgen.co.uk/warmem/ashchurchwm.htm.   I created a community at Lives of the First World War specifically for this memorial. 

Ashchurch Village Hall

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 26/12/2017

Updated: 15/01/2018 — 08:03

Durban High School War Memorial

The images of the Durban High School War Memorial are courtesy of Shelly Baker. It may be found at GE co-ordinates -29.844204°, 30.997675°.

The school has existed since 1866 and recently celebrated it’s 150th anniversary. Sadly the Roll of Honour lists so many from the school that perished during the two World Wars as well as the Korean Conflict and the Border War, and one of it’s most famous old boys was Edwin Swales VC.  It is the oldest standing school in Durban and one of the oldest in South Africa.

250 old boys died, and more than 2000 were injured in both World Wars.  The Victoria Cross (VC), 27 Distinguished Flying Crosses (DFC), 21 Military Crosses (MC), 10 Military Medals (MM) and 8 Distinguished Service Orders (DSO) were awarded to old boys in these and subsequent conflicts. In the Battle of Delville Wood in 1916, 12 old boys were killed, 9 wounded and 3 were taken prisoner. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durban_High_School)

The dome was designed by Professor L. Croft, and old boy, and was erected at the Durban High School and Old Boy’s Memorial Trust through the generosity of the late Mrs Lilian Readshaw, a benefactor of the school. Dedicated by the Reverend R. Horrocks, 11 November 1992.

Roll of Honour panels are available on request.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 10/07/2017

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:16

202 Battalion Memorial

34 Battalion was commonly known as the “Kavangoland Battalion” and it was established in 1975 as 1 Kavango Battalion to serve as a ceremonial guard of honour.  It was then renamed 34 Battalion and again renamed 202 Battalion in 1980.

As part of Sector 20, their main area of responsibility was from Rundu West as far as Sector 10 and East up to the Bagani Bridge and they were credited with completely suppressing all insurgency activities in the Kavango area of the South West Africa region by 1987. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/34_Battalion. The unit was disbanded in 1990/1991

In 1987, Cmdt JR Liebenberg tasked the RSM, WO1 FJS Scheepers to erect a Memorial to the Fallen of 202 battalion and to create a museum at the base in Rundu in what was then South West Africa. It was inaugurated by Major General WC Meyer and OC Sector 20 Col. PM Muller on 8 November 1987

 

 

When South West Africa gained it’s independence the memorial, like many memorials in the operational area was moved to safety, but unfortunately it went “missing” and was eventually traced to the Army College in Pretoria but it had been destroyed at some point.

The Roll of Honour falling victim at the same time.

It is hoped that one day a new memorial will be erected to remember those members of 202 Battalion who paid the ultimate price. 

Roll Of Honour.

The  Roll of Honour is a work in process as more information is forthcoming. It is based off the ROH at the 202 Bn Wikipedia page but is by no means complete)

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 16/04/2017. Images courtesy of Charl Parkin, used with permission. 

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:48

Gloucestershire Royal Hussars Memorial

The memorial to the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars may be found in the parking lot of Gloucester Cathedral. It features a cross on a  many sided base which has bronze reliefs depicting various actions by the Hussars and Yeomanry during both World Wars.

 

The memorial may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates  51°52’3.50″N,   2°14’53.01″W. The chapel in the cathedral may be found very close to the effigies of King Edward II and Osric, Prince of Mercia. It features stained glass windows dedicated to the memory of members of the Gloucestershire Regiment as well as the memory of the crew of HMS Gloucester who lost their lives off Crete on 22 May 1941.

The Chapel also has 4 Rolls of Honour that hold the names of the men involved in the conflicts.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 30/08/2015

Updated: 26/08/2018 — 19:57

Tewkesbury War Memorial

The War Memorial in Tewkesbury is situated on an island that sits at the intersection of Barton Str, Church Str,  and High Street. Google Earth co-ordinates are 51°59’32.75″N,   2° 9’27.29″W.

This position also makes it very difficult to photograph because of all the traffic going past (and it never seems to stop). It is also very vulnerable to any vehicle that misses the turning, although I have no statistics as to how many times it has been hit. (2010 a vehicle collided with it).

The memorial is also known as the Tewkesbury Cross and is described as: “A tapered octagonal shaft with moulded capital and a cross, on an octagonal plinth cut  through by a square base with diagonal buttresses at centres of the sides, carrying 4 pinnacles. All set on a broad 3-step hexagonal base, the lowest step with nosing, on a final hexagonal platform which has been rounded, and protected by 6 stone bollards. The cross carries a central shield of arms, and the base has a series of 6 bronze plates with the names of the fallen inscribed, dated 1914-1919 (sic). A further plate has been added covering the years 1939-1945.” (http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-376922-war-memorial-tewkesbury-gloucestershire#.VYWwmmerP5I)

On 01/07/2018, two additional plaques were added to the memorial for the two world wars. 

World War One

World War Two

Roll of Honour.

1914-1918
E. Andrews : A. H. Askew : C. Attwood : C. Bailey :
T. Ball :  W. Ball :  P. Barnes :  W.J. Barnfield :
W.H. Bastable :  T. Beesley :  W.F. Birt : T. Bishop :
H.N. Bloxham : J. Broadwell : A.L. Brookes :
R. Clarke : A. Cleal : F.C. Clements : J. Cole :
J. Coleman : R.N. Coleman : F.J. Collins :
J. Cook : J.H. Cook : A. Coopey :  A.H. Cornish :
J.S. Dale :  C.L. Davey : S. Davies : A.C. Day : R. Day :
W.A. Day : F. Dee : B. Devereux : L.F. Devereux :
F. Dickinson : A.J. Didcote : H.F. Didcote :
W.B. Didcote : G. Eagles : T.J. Evans : W. Fitton ;
A.J. Fletcher : Pte. C. E. Garratt : F.N. Green :
W.C. Green : H.A. Greening : J. Greening :
L. Gurney : F.E. Hale : R. Hall : T. Hall :
T. Harrington : A. Harrison : S. Hathaway :
F. Hawker : P.C. Hawker :  W. Hawker : A.G. Hodges :
W. Hodges : A.E. Hooper : T.J. Horne :  C. Howell :
C. Hurcombe : H. Hurcombe : D.R. Hutchinson :
H.W. Hyett : J. Jeynes : A.L. Jones : G.H. Jones :
J.L. Jones : L. Jones : P.H. Jones : W. Jones :
W.H. Jones : A. Jordan : A.E. Jordan :
W. Keylock : W. King : G. Mann : L.V. Mann :
N.J. Mann :  J. Matty : F. Mayall : L.W. Moore :
T.H. Moore : F. Neale : T. New : C. Newman :
T.J. Osborne : A.C. Papps : W.J.M. Parker :
J.J. Parnell : T. Parrott : J. Parsons :
F. Perkins : W.W. Pitman : H. Preston : F. T. Price :
W.A. Price : W.H. Price : D.L. Priestley :
S.N. Priestley : W.J. Prosser : A.C. Purser :
F.T. Raggatt : A.E. Reynolds : C.W.M. Rice :
E. Rice : W. Roberts : A.H. Rowley : H.E. Rowley :
H.G. Rowley : A.C. Sallis : A.F. Sallis : A.J. Sallis :
C. Sandford : R.C. Sayers : W. Sheldon :
J.A. Simms : T. Simmons :  C. Simons : E.W. Simons :
A.E. Sircombe : A. Smith : H.G. Stubbs : R.B. Sweet :
A.G. Taylor : C. Taylor : F. Taylor : G.H. Taylor :
R.J.W. Taylor : H. Thompson : J.W. Timms : L. Tysoe :
G. Turberville : T. Underwood : C.W. Wagstaff :
J. Wagstaff : J. Walker : A.W. Wallace : H. Warner :
H.J. Waylen : A.C. Wilkinson : F. Wilkinson :
B. Williams : E. Williams : R. Williams :
T. Williams : C. Wise : A. Woodhull :  F. Woolcott :

Additional 1914-1918 casualties added on 02/08/2018.

A.E. Fletcher :  F. Green :  F.G. Green :
H Knight :  V.W. Marment : 
 P. L. Marment : A.J.E. Parsons :  
L. Rossell : K. Sollis :  F.W. Taylor :

1939-1945

A. Allan :  L. Barrett :  J. Bassett : A. Bishop : W. Booth : B. Dee :
C. Gough : H.F.E. Gyngell : H.S. Halling : R. Haynes : A.J. Howes :
E.S. Hunt : E. Hyett :  F.J. Jenkins : C.F. Key : F. Key : K.S. Nash :
L.H.J. Osborne : E. Page : A.J. Parker : W.E. Portlock : 
H.O.D. Ricketts : C. Ryland : J. Shephard : V. Turberville :
G. Ashton :  E. Bostock : R. Dickenson : G.W Gregson : A. Martin : 

Additional 1939-1945 casualties added on 02/08/2018

J.C. Cash : R.E.. Collett
A. Hanlon : W.F. Portlock

In honour of those who gave their lives in the service of their country other conflicts:

B.D. Soden. Northern Ireland 1972

 

There is also a very impressive World War One Memorial in nearby Tewkesbury Abbey.

And in the neighbouring parish of Ashchurch there is another War Memorial.

Ashchurch War Memorial

DRW ©  2015 – 2018. Created 20/06/2015, added new names and plaques 01/07/2018

Updated: 02/07/2018 — 19:54
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