Tag: Portsmouth Highland Road Cemetery

William Goate VC

William Goate (12/01/1836 – 24/10/1901) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Siege of Lucknow during the Indian Mutiny.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 22212, Page: 5512, reads:

“9th Lancers, Lance-Corporal W. Goat Date of Act of Bravery, 6th March, 1858

For conspicuous gallantry at Lucknow, on the 6th of March, 1858, in having dismounted, in the presence of a number of the enemy, and taken up the body of Major Smyth, 2nd Dragoon Guards, which he attempted to bring off the field, and after being obliged to relinquish it, being surrounded by the enemy’s cavalry, he went a second time under a heavy fire to recover the body. Despatch from Major-General Sir James Hope Grant, K.C.B., dated 8th April, 1858.”

His surname is misspelt in the original citation. 

He died of cancer at Southsea and was buried in Highland Road Cemetery in Portsmouth, plot E, row 5, grave 20. His grave has been reused twice since and  a memorial stone was erected in October 2003

Portsmouth Highland Road Cemetery

© DRW 2016-2018, Created 29/10/2016, edited 13/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:54

Israel Harding VC.

Israel Harding (21/10/1833 – 22/05/1917) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Anglo Egyptian War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 25147, Page: 4260, reads:

Mr. Israel Harding, Gunner, of Her Majesty’s Ship; “Alexandra”.

At about nine o’clock, on the morning of the 11th July, whilst Her Majesty’s Ship “Alexandra” was engaging the Forts at Alexandria, a 10-inch spherical shell passed through the ship’s side and lodged on the main deck. Mr. Harding hearing the shout “there is a live shell just above the hatchway,” rushed up the ladder frorn below, and, observing that the fuze was burning, took some water from a tub standing near, and threw it over the projectile, then picked up the shell and put it into the tub. Had the shell burst, it would probably have destroyed many lives.

He is buried in Highland Road Cemetery, Portsmouth

Portsmouth Highland Road Cemetery

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 28/10/2016. Edited 13/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:54

William Nathan Wrighte Hewett VC, KCB, KCSI

William Nathan Wrighte Hewett  (12/08/1834 – 13/05/1888) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 652 reads:

“Wm. Nathan Wright Hewett, Lieutenant.

1st. On the occasion of a repulse of a sortie of Russians by Sir De Lacy Evans’ Division on the 26th October, 1854, Mr. Hewett, then Acting-Mate of Her Majesty’s Ship “Beagle,” was in charge of the Right Lancaster Battery before Sebastopol. The advance of the Russians placed the gun in great jeopardy, their skirmishers advancing within 300 yards of the Battery, and pouring in a sharp fire from their Minié rifles. By some misapprehension the word was passed to spike the gun and retreat; but Mr. Hewett, taking upon himself the responsibility of disregarding the order replied, that “Such order did not come from Captain Lushington, and he would not do it till it did.” Mr. Hewett then pulled down the parapet of the Battery, and with the assistance of some soldiers, got his gun round, and poured upon the advancing column of Russians a most destructive and effective fire.

For the gallantry exhibited on this occasion, the Board of Admiralty promoted him to the rank of Lieutenant.

2nd. On the 5th November, 1854, at the Battle of Inkerman, Captain Lushington again brought before the Commander-in-chief the services of Mr. Hewett, saying, “I have much pleasure in again bringing Mr. Hewett’s gallant conduct to your notice.”

(Sir S. Lushington to Vice-Admiral Sir J. D. Dundas, inclosed in. despatches of 1st November, 1854, and 8th November, 1854).”

He is buried in Highland Road Cemetery in Portsmouth.

Portsmouth Highland Road Cemetery

© DRW 2013-2018. Created 28/10/2016. Edited 13/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:54

Hugh Stewart Cochrane VC

Hugh Stewart Cochrane (04/08/1829 – 23/04/1884) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the the Indian Mutiny in 1858

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 22212, Page: 5518, reads:

“86th Regiment (now the 16th Regiment)

Lieutenant and Adjutant (now Captain) Hugh Stewart Cochrane Date of Act of Bravery, 1st April, 1853.

For conspicuous gallantry near Jhansi, on the 1st of April, 1858, when No. 1 Company of the Regiment was ordered to take a gun, in dashing forward at a gallop, under a heavy musketry and artillery fire, driving the enemy from the gun, and keeping possession of it till the Company came up. Also for conspicuous gallantry in attacking the rear-guard of the enemy, when he had three horses shot under him in succession.

Despatch from Major-General Sir Hugh Henry Rose, G.C.B., dated 23rd April, 1858″

He is buried in Highland Road Cemetery in Portsmouth.

 

Portsmouth Highland Road Cemetery

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 28/10/2016, edited 13/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:54

Henry James Raby. VC. CB

Henry James Raby (26/09/1827 –  13/02/1907) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War in 1855.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 653,  reads:

“Henry James Raby,

Commander John Taylor,

Captain of the Forecastle Henry Curtis, Boatswain’s Mate.

On the 18th June, 1855, immediately after the assault on Sebastopol, a soldier of the 57th Regiment, who had been shot through both legs, was observed sitting up, and calling for assistance. Climbing; over the breastwork of the advanced sap, Commander Baby and the two seamen proceeded upwards of seventy yards across the open space towards the salient angle of the Bedan, and in spite of the heavy fire which was still continuing, succeeded in carrying the wounded soldier to a place of safety, at the imminent risk of their own lives. (Letter from Sir S. Lushington, 7th June, 1856.)”

Raby was the first man to receive the VC from The Queen at the first investiture on 26 June 1857. The Queen pinned the crosses on the recipients in strict order of Service precedence and seniority. Commander Raby therefore came first as the senior officer in the senior service on parade, although his V.C. deed had been performed after that of the midshipman, Lucas, who certainly stands as the first to be awarded the Victoria Cross. Similarly in the army contingent, Sergeant-Major Grieve was the first soldier on the parade to receive the cross, because he belonged to the Cavalry, an arm senior to the Infantry, although his VC deed was later than those of the four infantry soldiers who earned it at the Alma.”

He died in Southsea, and is buried in Highland Road Cemetery in Portsmouth.

Portsmouth Highland Road Cemetery

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 27/10/2016, edited 13/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:54

William Temple VC

William Temple (07/11/1833 – 13/02/1919) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the New Zealand Wars in 1863 at Rangiriri

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 22896, Page: 4552 reads:

“Royal Artillery. 

Assistant-Surgeon William Temple and Lieutenant Arthur Frederick Pickard. Date of Acts of Bravery, November 20th, 1863.

For gallant conduct during the assault on the enemy’s position at Rangiriri, in New Zealand, on the 20th of November last, in exposing their lives to imminent danger, in crossing the entrance of the Maori keep, at a point upon which the enemy had concentrated their fire, with a view to render assistance to the wounded, and, more especially to the late Captain Mercer, of the Royal Artillery.

Lieutenant Pickard, it is stated, crossed, and re-crossed the parapet, to procure water for the wounded, when none of the men could be induced to perform this service, the space over which he traversed being exposed to a crossfire; and testimony is borne to the calmness displayed by him, and Assistant-Surgeon Temple, under the trying circumstances in which they were placed.

He died in Tunbridge Wells, Kent, and is buried in Highland Road Cemetery in Portsmouth.

There is a commemorative Plaque for him at the National Memorial Arboretum.

Asst Surg. William Temple. VC.

Portsmouth Highland Road Cemetery

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 27/10/2016, edited 13/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:55

Hugh Shaw VC. CB

Hugh Shaw (04/02/1839 – 25/08/1904) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the New Zealand Land Wars in 1865.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 23044, Page: 6005, reads:

“18th Regiment. 

Captain Hugh Shaw Date of Act of Bravery, January 24, 1865.

For his gallant conduct at the skirmish near Nukumaru, in New Zealand, on the 24th of January last, in proceeding, under a heavy fire, with four Privates of the Regiment, who volunteered to accompany, him, to within 30 yards of the bush occupied by the Rebels, in order to carry off a comrade who was badly wounded. On the afternoon of that day, Captain Shaw was ordered to occupy a position about half a mile from the Camp. He advanced in skirmishing order, and, when about 30-yards from the bush, he deemed it prudent to retire to a palisade about 60 yards from the bush, as two of his party had been wounded. Finding that one of them was unable to move, he called for volunteers to advance to the front to carry the man to the rear, and the four Privates referred to accompanied him, under a heavy fire, to the place where the wounded man was lying, and they succeeded in bringing him to the rear.”

He died in Southsea in 1904 and is buried in Highland Road Cemetery in Portsmouth.

 

Portsmouth Highland Road Cemetery

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 27/10/2016

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:55

John Robarts VC

John Robarts (1818 – 17/10/1888) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War while serving as a  gunner in the Royal Navy.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 650, reads:

“John Roberts, Gunner.

This Warrant Officer landed with Lieutenants Buckley and Burgoyne at Genitchi, in presence of a superior force, and set fire to the Stores, a service of imminent risk. (Despatch from Admiral Lord Lyons, 2nd June, 1855, No. 419.).” 

“On 29 May 1855 in the Sea of Azov, Crimea, Gunner Robarts of HMS Ardent with two lieutenants (Cecil William Buckley and Hugh Talbot Burgoyne), one from HMS Miranda and the other from HMS Swallow, volunteered to land on a beach where the Russian army were in strength. They were out of covering gunshot range of the ships offshore and met considerable enemy opposition, but managed to set fire to corn stores and ammunition dumps and destroy enemy equipment before embarking again. 

He is buried in Highland Road Cemetery in Portsmouth.

Portsmouth Highland Road Cemetery

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 22/06/2016. Edited 13/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:42
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