Tag: Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing

William Hackett VC

William Hackett (11/06/1873 – 27/06/1916) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 22 June/23 June 1916 at Shaftesbury Avenue Mine, near Givenchy-lès-la-Bassée, France.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29695, Page: 7744, reads:

“No. 136414 Sppr. William Hackett, late Royal Engineers.

For most conspicuous bravery when entombed with four others in a gallery owing to the explosion of an enemy mine.

After working for 20 hours a hole was made through fallen earth and broken timber, and the outside party was met. Sapper Hackett helped three of the men through the hole and could easily have followed, but refused to leave the fourth, who had been seriously injured, saying ” I am a tunneller, I must look after the others first.”

Meantime the hole was getting smaller, yet he still refused to leave his injured comrade. Finally the gallery collapsed, and though the rescue party worked desperately for four days the attempt to reach the two men failed.

Sapper Hackett, well knowing the nature of sliding earth, the chances against him, deliberately gave his life for his comrade.”

His body was not recovered and he is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing. in Belgium, Panel 1. 

 

Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 01/05/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. Gallaher cigarette card by Card Promotions © 2003, first issued 1916.

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:13

Thomas Tannatt Pryce VC, MC*

Thomas Tannatt Pryce (17/01/1886 – 13/04/1918) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions On 11 April 1918 at Vieux-Berquin, France while an acting captain in the 4th Battalion, Grenadier Guards.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 30697, Page: 6057,  reads:

“Lt. (A./Capt.) Thomas Tannatt Pryce, M.C., G. Gds. For most conspicuous bravery, devotion to duty, and self-sacrifice when in command of a  flank on the left of the Grenadier Guards. Having been ordered to attack a -village, he personally led forward two platoons, working from house to house, killing some thirty of the enemy, seven of whom he killed himself.

The next day he was occupying a position with some thirty to forty men, the remainder of his company having become casualties. As early as 8.15 a.m. his left flank was surrounded and the enemy was enfilading him. He was attacked no less than four times during the day, and each time beat off the hostile attack, killing many of the enemy.

Meanwhile, the enemy brought up three field guns to within 300 yards of his line, and were firing over open sights and knocking his trench in. At 6.15 p.m. the enemy had worked to within sixty yards of his trench. He then called on his men, telling them to cheer and charge the enemy and fight to the last. Led by Captain Pryce, they left their trench and drove back the enemy, with the bayonet, some 100 yards. Half an hour later the enemy had again approached in stronger force. By this time Captain Pryce had only 17 men left, and every round of his ammunition had been fired. Determined that there should be no surrender, he once again led his men forward in a bayonet charge, and was last seen engaged in a fierce hand-to-hand struggle with overwhelming numbers of the enemy.

With some forty men he had held back at least one enemy battalion for over ten hours. His company undoubtedly stopped the advance through the British line, and thus had great influence on the battle.” 

He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing. in Belgium, Panel 1.

Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 01/05/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green.

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:10

James MacKenzie VC

James MacKenzie (02/04/1889 – 19/12/1914) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on the 19th of  December 1914 at Rouges Blancs, France.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29074, Page: 1700 reads:

“8185 Private James Mackenzie, late 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards.

For conspicuous bravery at Rouges’ Blancs on the 19th December, in rescuing a severely wounded man from in front of the German trenches, under a very heavy fire and after a stretcher-bearer party had been compelled to abandon the attempt. Private Mackenzie was subsequently killed on that day whilst in the performance of a similar act of gallant conduct.”

He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing. in Belgium, Panel 1.

Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 01/05/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. Gallaher cigarette card reproduction by Card Promotions © 2003, first issued 1915.

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:10
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