Tag: Military Cross

Edward Corringham “Mick” Mannock VC, DSO, MC.

Edward Corringham “Mick” Mannock (24/05/1887 – 26/07/1918) Was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions while serving with the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War. 

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 31463, Page: 9136, reads:

“His Majesty the KING has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Victoria Cross to the late Captain (acting Major) Edward Mannock, D.S.O., M.C., 85th Squadron Royal Air Force, in recognition of bravery of the first order in Aerial Combat:

— On the 17th June, 1918, he attacked a Halberstadt machine near Armentieres and destroyed it from a height of 8,000 feet.

On the 7th July, 1918, near Doulieu, he attacked and destroyed one Fokker (red-bodied) machine, which went vertically into the ground from a height of 1,500 feet. Shortly afterwards he ascended 1,000 feet and attacked another Fokker biplane, firing 60 rounds into it, which produced an immediate spin, resulting, it is believed, in a crash.

On the 14th July, 1918, near Merville, he attacked and crashed a Fokker from 7,000 feet, and brought a two-seater down damaged.

On the 19th July, 1918, near Merville, he fired 80 rounds into an Albatross two-seater, which went to the ground in flames.

On the 20th July, 1918, East of La Bassee, he attacked and crashed an enemy two-seater from a height of 10,000 feet.

About an hour afterwards he attacked at 8,000 feet a Fokker biplane near Steenwercke and drove it down out of control, emitting smoke. On the 22nd July, 1918, near Armentieres, he destroyed an enemy triplane from a height of 10,000 feet.

Major Mannock was awarded the undermentioned distinctions for his previous combats in the air in France and Flanders: — Military Cross. Gazetted 17th September, 1917.

Bar to Military Cross. ‘Gazetted 18th October, 1917.

Distinguished Service Order. Gazetted 16th September, 1918.

Bar to Distinguished Service Order (1st). Gazetted 16th September, 1918.

Bar to Distinguished Service Order (2nd). Gazetted 3rd August, 1918.

This highly distinguished officer, during the whole of his career in the Royal Air Force, was an outstanding example of fearless courage, remarkable skill, devotion to duty and self sacrifice, which has never been surpassed. The total number of machines definitely accounted for by Major Mannock up to the date of his death in France (26th July, 1918) is fifty —the total specified in the Gazette” of 3rd August, 1918, was incorrectly given as 48, instead of 41″

He was killed in action dogfighting too close to the ground on 26 July 1918 and has no known grave, and is Commemorated on the Royal Flying Corps Memorial to the Missing at the Faubourg d’Amiens CWGC Cemetery in Arras. It is speculated that the remains in Grave 12, Plot III, Row F, of Laventie CWGC war cemetery, could be those of Mick Mannock.

The Wartime service and deaths of James McCudden VC and Edward Mannock VC were the subject of a documentary on the BBC entitled “Aces Falling

Arras Memorial to the Missing. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 01/05/2017. Inscription image courtesy of Mark Green. 

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:10

John “Jack” Harrison VC, MC.

John “Jack” Harrison  (12/11/1890 – 03/05/1917) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on the 3rd of May 1917 when ordered, with the rest of his brigade, to attack a wood near Oppy, Pas-de-Calais.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette  of Supplement: 30130, Page: 5866, reads:

“R. T/2nd Lt. John Harrison, M.C., E. York.

For most conspicuous bravery and self sacrifice in an attack.

Owing to darkness and to smoke from the enemy barrage, and from our own, and to the fact that our objective was in a dark wood, it was impossible to see when our barrage had lifted off the enemy front line.

Nevertheless, 2nd Lt. Harrison led his company against the enemy trench under heavy rifle and machine-gun fire, but was repulsed. Reorganising his command as best he could in No Man’s Land, he again attacked in darkness under terrific fire, but with no success.

Then, turning round, this gallant officer single-handed made a dash at the machinegun, hoping to knock out the gun and so save the lives of many of his company.

His self-sacrifice and absolute disregard of danger was an inspiring example to all. (He is reported missing, believed killed.)”

He was also awarded the Military Cross for his actions on 25 February 1917,  when he lead a patrol into no man’s land.

The Citation reads: 

“Temp. 2nd Lt. John Harrison, E. York. R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He handled his platoon with great courage and skill, reached his objective under the most trying conditions, and captured a prisoner. He set a splendid example throughout.”

He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial to the Missing, France. Bay 4 and 5. 

 

Arras Memorial to the Missing. Image courtesy of Ralph Mclean and the South African War Graves Project. 

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 29/04/2017. Inscription image courtesy of Mark Green.

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:04

Rupert Price Hallowes VC, MC

Rupert Price Hallowes (05/05/1881 – 30/09/1915) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions between 25 and 30 September 1915 at Hooge, Belgium.

The Citation, recorded by the London Gazette on 16 November 1915, Supplement: 29371, Page: 11448 reads:

“Temporary Second Lieutenant Rupert Price Hallowes, 4th Battalion, The Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex Regiment).

For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty during the fighting at Hooge between 25th September and 1st October, 1915.

Second Lieutenant Hallowes displayed throughout these days the greatest bravery and untiring energy, and set a magnificent example to his men during four heavy and prolonged bombardments. On more than one occasion he climbed up on the parapet, utterly regardless of danger, in order to put fresh heart into his men. He made daring reconnaissances of the German positions in cur lines. When the supply of bombs was running short he went,back under very heavy shell fire and brought up a fresh supply. Even after he was mortally wounded he continued to cheer those around him and to inspire them with fresh courage.”

He is buried in Bedford House Cemetery, Zillebeke, Belgium.

© DRW 2017-2018, created 25/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. Gallaher cigarette card by Card Promotions © 2001, first issued 1916. 

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:07

William Frederick Faulds VC. MC.

Private William Frederick Faulds (19/02/1895 – 16/02/1950), was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Battle of Delville Wood on 18 July 1916.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29740, Page: 8870 reads:

For most, conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty. A bombing party under Lieut. Craig attempted to rush across 40 yards of ground which lay between the British and enemy trenches. Coming under very heavy rifle and machine gun fire the officer and the majority of the party were killed or wounded.

Unable to move, Lieut. Craig lay midway between the two lines of trench, the ground being quite open.

In full daylight Pte. Faulds, accompanied by two other men, climbed over the parapet, ran out, picked up the officer, and carried him back, one man being severely wounded in so doing.

Two days later Private Faulds again showed most conspicuous bravery in going out alone to bring in a wounded man, and carrying him nearly half a mile to a dressing-station, subsequently rejoining his platoon. The artillery fire was at the time so intense that stretcher-bearers and others considered that any attempt to bring in the wounded men meant certain death. This risk Private Faulds faced unflinchingly, and his bravery was crowned with success.

As a temporary Lieutenant, he was also awarded the Military Cross for actions at Hendicourt on 22 March 1918. This citation, for the Military Cross reads:

“In the retirement from the line east of Hendicourt, 22 March 1918, he was commanding one of the platoons which formed the rear-guard. He handled his men most ably, and exposed himself freely. Though the enemy pressed hard, he, by his fearless and able leadership, checked them, and enabled the remainder of the battalion to withdraw with slight loss”

He died on 16 February 1950 and was buried in Pioneer Cemetery, Harare, Zimbabwe

WF Faulds VC Memorial Stone.  National Memorial Arboretum

William Frederick Faulds VC Memorial Stone. National Memorial Arboretum

DRW © 2016-2020. Created 08/08/2016. Gallaher cigarette card by Card Promotions © 2003. First issued 1918.

Updated: 05/01/2020 — 14:06

James Forbes-Robertson VC, DSO, MC, DL

James Forbes-Robertson, 07/07/1884 – 05/08/1955) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 11/12 April 1918 near Vieux Berquin, France.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 30697, Page: 6057 reads: 

“Captain (A./Lt.-Col.) James Forbes-Robertson, D.S.O., M.C., Bord. R.

For most conspicuous bravery whilst commanding his battalion during the heavy fighting. Through his quick judgement, resource, untiring energy and magnificent example, Lt.- Col. Forbes-Robertson on four separate occasions saved the line from breaking and averted a situation which might have had the most serious and far-reaching results.

On the first occasion, when troops in front were falling back, he made a rapid reconnaissance on horse-back, in full view of the enemy, under heavy machine-gun and close range shell fire. He then organised and, still mounted, led a counter-attack which was completely successful in re-establishing our line. When his horse was shot under him he continued on foot.

Later on the same day, when troops to the left of his line were giving way, he went to that flank and checked and steadied the line, inspiring confidence by his splendid coolness and disregard of personal danger. His horse was wounded three times and he was thrown five times.

The following day, when the troops on. both his flanks were forced to retire, he formed a post at battalion headquarters and with his battalion still held his ground, thereby covering the retreat of troops on his flanks. Under the heaviest fire this gallant officer fearlessly exposed himself when collecting parties, organising and encouraging.

On a subsequent occasion, when troops were retiring on his left and the condition of things on his right were obscure, he again saved the situation by his magnificent example and cool judgement. Losing a second horse, he continued alone on foot until he had established a line to which his own troops could withdraw and so conform to the general situation. ”

He is buried in Prestbury Cemetery in Cheltenham. 

James Forbes-Robertson VC, DSO, MC, DL 07/07/1884 - 05/08/1955. Prestbury Cemetery, Cheltenham

Grave Insciption

The Cross of Sacrifice. Prestbury Cemetery, Cheltenham.

DRW © 2015 – 2020. Created 08/08/2015, edited 03/05/2017

Updated: 05/01/2020 — 14:55

Reginald Frederick Johnson Hayward VC, MC*

Captain Reginald Frederick Johnson Hayward VC was the son of stockbreeder Frederick and Gertrude Hayward. He was born on 17 June 1891 at the Beersheba Mission Station near Swartruggens, East Griqualand, and was educated at Hilton College Natal, Durban Business College and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the United Kingdom.
In May 1912 Reginald joined 6th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment and was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant on 29 September 1914. During October 1916 he was involved in action at Stuff Redoubt, Thiepval, France and he was awarded the Military Cross, a bar was added to his MC during the battle of Messines in Belgium.

In March 1918, as the Germans advanced towards Bapaume, the 1st Battalion The Wiltshire Regiment was moved to the north of Fremicourt, a village east of Bapaume and just south of the Cambrai road. 4th Corps was trying to hold a line between Vaulx and Morchies to the north of the road. The surviving Wiltshires, three officers and 54 NCO’s and men, were gathered at Bihucourt, north-west of Bapaume, on 24 March. When the German offensive had opened on the 21st, 8th Battalion The Gloucestershire Regiment mounted an unsuccessful counter-attack at Doignies to try and contain the enemy advance south of the Cambrai-Bapaume road. They were then withdrawn west to Velu Wood. By the 23rd, the German advance had reached this point and the Glosters, together with the 10th Battalion The Royal Warwickshire Regiment was ordered to cover the further withdrawal of British forces. Bapaume itself was abandoned to the Germans.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette for Supplement: 30648,  Page:4967, reads:

“For most conspicuous bravery in action. This officer, while in command of a company, displayed almost superhuman powers of endurance and consistent courage of the rarest nature. In spite of the fact that he was buried, wounded in the head, and rendered deaf on the first day of operations, and had his arm shattered two days later, he refused to leave his men (even though he received a third serious injury to his head), until he collapsed from sheer physical exhaustion.

Throughout the whole of this period the enemy was attacking his company front without cessation, but Captain Hayward continued to move across the open front from one trench to another with absolute disregard of his own personal safety, concentrating entirely on re-organising his defences and encouraging his men.

It was almost entirely due to the magnificent example of ceaseless energy of this officer that many determined attacks on his portion of the trench system failed entirely.

Reginald Hayward survived the war and continued to serve in the military in Dublin, Egypt and Palestine. In April 1935 he was transferred to the Reserves. During the Second World War he served as Commander of the Royal Army Service Corps Anti-Aircraft Command. He retired on 09 July 1947 as an Honorary Lieutenant Colonel.

Apart from his Victoria Cross and Military Cross with Bar he was awarded the 1914 – 1915 Star, British War Medal 1914 – 1920, Victory Medal 1914 – 1919, Defence Medal 1939 – 1945, Coronation Medal 1937, Coronation Medal 1953 and Territorial Efficiency decoration.
He died on 17 January 1970 in Chelsea, London and was cremated on 23 January 1970 at the Putney Vale Crematorium, London while his ashes are scattered in the Garden of Remembrance.

Reginald Hayward VC Memorial Stone National Memorial Arboretum

Reginald Hayward VC

Memorial Stone

National Memorial Arboretum

(Based off an extract published in The VC and the GC, The Complete History, by Methuen and The VC and GC Association in 2013.

© DRW 2015-2018. Created 08/03/2015, edited 17/05/2017

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 07:36

John Aidan Liddell VC. MC.

John Aidan Liddell (03/08/1888 – 31/08/1915) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 31 July 1915, while flying reconnaissance over OstendBrugesGhent, Belgium.

63 JA Liddell VC.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29272, Page: 8373, reads: 

“Captain John Aidan Liddell, 3rd Battalion, Princess Louise’s (Argyll- and Sutherland Highlanders), and Royal Flying Corps.

For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty on 31st July, 1915. When on a flying reconnaissance over Ostend-Bruges-Ghent he was severely wounded (his right thigh being broken), which caused momentary unconsciousness, but by a great effort he recovered partial control after his machine had dropped nearly 3,000 feet, and notwithstanding his collapsed state succeeded, although continually fired at, in completing his course, and brought the aeroplane into our lines— half an hour after he had been wounded.
The difficulties experienced by this Officer in saving his machine, and the life of his observer, cannot be readily expressed, but as the control wheel and throttle control were smashed, and also one of the undercarriage struts, it would seem incredible that he could have accomplished his task.”

Captain John Aidan_Liddell_vc.

Captain John Aidan_Liddell_VC.

He died as a result of the wounds he received at La Panne, Belgium on 31 August 1915, aged 27.  He is buried in Holy Ghost Cemetery, Basingstoke.

Captain John Aidan Liddell VC.

Captain John Aidan Liddell VC.

And he is commemorated on the Sherfield-On-Loddon War Memorial.

DRW © 2014 – 2020. Created 01/11/2014. Edited 14/05/2017. Gallaher cigarette card by Card Promotions © 2001, first issued 1915.

Updated: 05/01/2020 — 14:44
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