Tag: London

Arthur Cross VC. MM.

Arthur Henry Cross (13/12/1884 – 23/11/1965) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 25 March 1918 at  Ervillers, France.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 30726, Page: 6572, reads:

“No. 62990 Pte. (A./L./Cpl.) Arthur Henry Cross, M.G. Corps (Camberwell).

For most conspicuous bravery and initiative. L./Cpl. Cross volunteered to make a reconnaissance of the position of two machine guns which had been captured by the enemy, He advanced single-Handed to the enemy trench and with his revolver forced seven of the enemy to surrender and carry the machine guns with their tripods and ammunition to our lines. He then handed over his prisoners, collected teams for his guns which he brought into action with exceptional dash and skill, annihilating a very heavy attack by the enemy.

It is impossible to speak too highly of the extreme gallantry, initiative and dash displayed by this N.C.O., who showed throughout four days of operations supreme devotion to duty. “

He is buried in Streatham Park Cemetery in London.

Arthur Henry Cross VC. MM. Streatham Park Cemetery, London

Arthur Henry Cross VC. MM. Streatham Park Cemetery, London

Streatham Park Cemetery, London

DRW ©  2015 – 20120. Created 18/09/2015, edited 08/05/2017

Updated: 05/01/2020 — 14:27

William Stanlake VC. DCM.

William Stanlake was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 657,  reads:

“Coldstream Guard. No. S9G8 Private William Stanlock,

For having volunteered, when employed as one of the sharpshooters in October 1854, for reconnoitring purposes, to crawl up within six yards of a Russian sentry, and so enabled the Officer in command to effect a surprise; Private Stanlock having been warned beforehand of the imminent risk which he would run in the adventure. “

*The name “Stanlock” was used in the citation as opposed to Stanlake.*

Willaim Stanlake VC. Camberwell Old Cemetery

Camberwell Old Cemetery

Path to the grave of William Stanlake VC

He is buried in Camberwell Old Cemetery in London.

DRW © 2013-2020. Created 14/09/2015, edited 04/05/2017

Updated: 05/01/2020 — 14:25

Albert Edward McKenzie. VC

Albert Edward McKenzie (23/10/1898 – 03/11/1918), was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during World War One while participating in the Zeebrugge Raid on 22/23 April 1918

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 30807, Page: 8586, reads:

“Able Seaman Albert Edward McKenzie, O.N. J31736 (Ch.).

For most conspicuous gallantry.

This rating belonged to B Company of seaman storming party. On the night of the operation he landed on the mole with his machine-gun in the face of great difficulties and did very good work, using his gun to the utmost advantage. He advanced down the mole with Lieutenant-Commander Harrison, who with most of his party was killed, and accounted for several of the enemy running from a shelter to a destroyer alongside the mole. This very gallant seaman was severely wounded whilst working his gun in an exposed position.

Able Seaman McKenzie was selected by the men of the “Vindictive,” “Iris II,” and ” Daffodil'” and of the naval assaulting force to receive the Victoria Cross under Rule 13 of the Royal Warrant dated 29th January 1896.”

He died of influenza during the world flu pandemic in October 1918 and is is buried in Camberwell Old Cemetery.

Albert E McKenzie Grave

Albert E McKenzie Grave

Camberwell Old Cemetery

DRW © 2015 – 2020. Created 26/08/2015

Updated: 05/01/2020 — 14:25

St Saviours Lewisham War Memorial

These two plaques are on the outside of  St Saviour, St John the Baptist and St John the Evangelist Catholic Church  in Lewisham. (Google Earth Co-ordinates:  51.460167°  -0.011005°.  stsaviourslewisham.org.uk)

Unfortunately I could not get proper images of the church, and was only able to grab snippets of it. The plaques are on either side of the main entrance, and the mosaic over the door ties in with the two memorial plaques.

© DRW 2013-2018. Moved to blog 10/05/2015

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:33

London Troops War Memorial

I almost walked into this memorial one gray morning when I was in the area of Bank Station, and I seem to recall I was heading elsewhere at the time so did not really take much heed of it. However, looking at my images I also did not really photograph it as well as I should have.

The memorial is known as the London Troops Memorial and may be found outside the Royal Exchange in the City of London

Two bronze statue of  soldiers represent  The Royal Fusiliers and the Royal Field Artillery.

The memorial  was unveiled on 12 November 1920 The memorial was unveiled by Prince Albert, Duke of York. and it too would have to be updated following the Second World War.

The main inscriptions reads:

The bronze figures were sculpted by Alfred Drury and the stone-carver and letterer was William Silver Frith, and the architect was Sir Aston Webb. and it is a Grade II listed building

 DRW © 2015 – 2018. Created 10/03/2015

Updated: 25/04/2018 — 07:57

Streatham War Memorial

I spotted this memorial on my way to Streatham Park Cemetery one find day in 2013. Unfortunately, it was being refurbished at the time and was surrounded by a fence.

Streatham War Memorial

Streatham War Memorial

It was not an unattractive memorial, and was designed Albert Toft in 1921 and unveiled the following year by General Sir Charles Monro, Bart., and the Rt. Revd C.F. Garbett, Lord Bishop of Southwark.

Bronze soldier on the memorial

Bronze soldier on the memorial

I was not sure whether I would come past here again, so photographed as best as I could around the fence.

Information signage

Information signage

A recent addition to the memorial was a plaque which read:
“In honour of
the men and women of Streatham
who gave their lives in the service
of their country in two world wars
1914-1918 and 1939-45
and in other conflicts.
“At the going down of the sun and in the morning
we will remember them.
From the people of Streatham 2010.”

Commemorative plaques

Commemorative plaques

The memorial is situated in Streatham Memorial Gardens. Google Earth co-ordinates: 51.423339°, -0.129240°.

Streatham Park Cemetery has a Cross of Sacrifice and a screen wall, as well as numerous CWGC graves in the cemetery. There are 404 identified casualties associated with the cemetery.

Streatham Park Cemetery Cross of Sacrifice

Streatham Park Cemetery Cross of Sacrifice

The cemetery is located at Google Earth Co-ordinates:  51.408312°,  -0.143051°

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 07/03/2015

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 07:35

Royal Artillery Memorial

In the area where Wellington Arch is, there are a number of War Memorials, one of which is the Royal Artillery Memorial. I did not see this memorial at its best, in fact it was looking decidedly green when I was there.

Wellington Arch and the Memorials in the area

Wellington Arch and the Memorials in the area

Royal Artillery Memorial

Royal Artillery Memorial

Neither was the weather very helpful on the occasions when I was taking photographs here. Even on the day I visited Wellington Arch I still could not get a sunny image of the memorial. However, World War 1 was not about sunny days, the all pervading view gained through black and white imagery is of cold and wet weather with gray leaden skies. Trying to imagine a battle like the Somme in colour would be almost impossible. Fortunately the sun did shine on me once.

The memorial on a sunny day

The memorial on a sunny day (Arch side)

Street side of the memorial

Street side of the memorial

Rear aspect of the memorial with the fallen artilleryman figure

Rear aspect of the memorial with the fallen artilleryman figure

The memorial is very rich in plaques, inscriptions and reliefs, but I think that the 4 bronze figures are what really make it stand out the most. In my opinion the most poignant of all is that of the fallen artilleryman. The inscription around the base reads “A Royal Fellowship of Death”.

The Fallen Artilleryman

The Fallen Artilleryman

In the front of the memorial is the figure of the Driver, he seems to look down on passers by as if to ask them whether they are worthy of the sacrifice that was made.

The Driver

The Driver

The gun portrayed on the memorial is 9.2-inch Mk I howitzer, and it was described by Lord Curzon as “a toad squatting, which is about to spit fire out of its mouth…nothing more hideous could ever be conceived”.

9.1" Breech loading Howitzer

9.2″ Breech loading howitzer

It is an incredibly powerful memorial, and generated a lot of criticism by those who had not manned the guns or been in the trenches, but overall the old soldiers seemed to understand the message that it carried.

The memorial’s main inscription on the west and east faces reads

“IN PROUD REMEMBRANCE OF THE
FORTY NINE THOUSAND AND SEVENTY-SIX
OF ALL RANKS OF THE
ROYAL REGIMENT OF ARTILLERY
WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES FOR KING
AND COUNTRY IN THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918″

Commemoration inscription

Commemoration inscription

In 2009 an addition plaque as added to the many already there.

THIS PANEL WAS ADDED TO
COMMEMORATE THE 29,924 OF ALL
RANKS OF THE ROYAL ARTILLERY
WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES FOR THEIR KING
AND COUNTRY IN ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD DURING THE WAR OF 1939-1945
+ THEY DIED WITH THE FAITH THAT
THE FUTURE OF ALL MANKIND WOULD
BENEFIT BY THEIR SACRIFICE. +
QUO FAS ET GLORIA

2009 Commemoration Plaque

2009 Commemoration Plaque

One of the relief panels on the memorial

One of the relief panels on the memorial

This memorial does not pull any punches, it is raw, emotional, and very powerful. It does not excuse itself or the men that are remembered here, and it does an excellent job of it too.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 07/03/2015

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 07:35

Commonwealth Memorial Gates

I did not realise the significance of this memorial at the time because there were just so many others in the immediate area. But with hindsight this is really an important memorial.

Wellingtons Arch and the Memorials in the area

Wellington Arch and the Memorials in the area

The Memorial Gates from street level

The Commonwealth Memorial Gates commemorate the armed forces of the British Empire from five regions of the Indian subcontinent, as well as Africa and the Caribbean, who served for Britain in the First and Second World Wars.

Dedication

Dedication

The view from Wellington Arch did not really give much indication that the gates were a memorial, and if it were not for the Memorial Pavilion and the Poppy Wreaths I probably would not have investigated much further.

View from Wellingtons Arch

View from Wellington Arch

The Cupola

The Memorial Pavilion. Wellington Arch is to the back on the left

World War 1 Campaign Stone

World War 1 Campaign Stone

The inside of the pavilion dome is inscribed with the names of  74 Victoria and George Cross  recipients. There are 23 VC recipients from World War I listed, 12 GC recipients from World War II, and 39 VC recipients from World War II.

Pavilion interior

Pavilion interior

Remembrance

Remembrance

Construction of the Memorial Gates began on 1 August 2001, and they were inaugurated on 6 November 2002 by Queen Elizabeth II.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 07/03/2015

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 07:36
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