Tag: Ladysmith

John Norwood VC

John Norwood (08/09/1876 – 08/09/1914) was serving as a second lieutenant in the 5th Dragoon Guards during the Second Boer War when his actions resulted in him being awarded the Victoria Cross.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of 20 July 1900, Issue: 27212, Page: 4509, reads:

“On the 30th October, 1899, this Officer went out from Ladysmith in charge of a small patrol of the 5th Dragoon Guards. They came under a heavy fire from the enemy, who were posted on a ridge in great force. The patrol, which had arrived within about 600 yards of the ridge, then retired at full speed. One man dropped, and Second Lieutenant Norwood galloped back about 300 yards through’heavy fire, dismounted, and picking up the fallen trooper, carried him out of fire on his back, at the same time leading his horse with one hand. The enemy kept up an incessant fire during the whole time that Second Lieutenant Norwood was carrying the man until he was quite out of range.”

He served in the First World War and was killed in action during the First Battle of the Marne at Sablonnieres, France, on 8 September 1914. He is buried in Plot 4, Sablonnieres Communal Cemetery, France.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 26/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green.

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:06

William Dick-Cunyngham VC

William Dick-Cunyngham (16/06/1851 – 06/01/1900) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Second Anglo-Afghan War in 1879

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 25027, Page: 5140, reads:

“The Gordon Highlanders ,

Lieutenant William Henry Dick Cunyngham,

For the conspicuous gallantry and coolness displayed by him on the 13th December, 1879, at the attack on the Sherpur Pass, in Afghanistan, in having exposed himself to the full fire of the enemy, and by his example and encouragement rallied the men who, having been beaten back, were, at the moment, wavering at the top of the hill.”

He was killed in action at the Siege of Ladysmith, on 6 January 1900, and is buried in Ladysmith Cemetery, KZN, South Africa.

 

This monument in Ladysmith marks the spot where he was mortally wounded. 

He is also mentioned on the Cheltenham Anglo Boer War Memorial

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 06/10/2015. Edited 17/05/2017. Grave image courtesy of Terry Cawood. Ladysmith Memorial courtesy of Adri Joubert Alborough. Taddy & Co cigarette card by Card Promotions, ©1997, first issued 1902. Images added 13/01/2017 

Updated: 10/01/2018 — 07:49

Robert Digby-Jones VC.

Robert James Thomas Digby-Jones was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Boer War in 1900.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 27462, Page: 5085 reads:

Lieutenant R. J. T. Digby Jones, Royal Engineers, and No. 459 Trooper H. Albrecht, Imperial Light Horse, Would have been recommended for the Victoria Cross had they survived, on account of their having during the attack on Waggon Hill (Ladysmith) of 6th January, 1900, displayed conspicuous bravery, and gallant conduct in leading the force which re-occupied the top of the hill at a critical moment just as the three foremost attacking Boers reached it, the leader being shot by Lieutenant Jones, and the two others by Trooper Albrecht.

digby-jones02

He is buried in Ladysmith Cemetery in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

© DRW  2015 – 2018. Created 06/10/2015. Image courtesy of Terry Cawood.

Updated: 10/01/2018 — 07:50

Frederick Hugh Sherston Roberts VC.

The grave of Frederick Hugh Sherston Roberts VC (08/01/1872 – 17/12/1899) may be found in Chievely Military Cemetery in Natal. He was the son of  Commander Field Marshal Frederick Roberts VC, 1st Earl Roberts.

Roberts was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross after an action at Colenso on 15 December 1899. Alongside several others he tried to save the guns of the 14th and 66th Batteries, Royal Field Artillery, when the detachments serving the guns had all become casualties or been driven from their guns.  Corporal George Nurse and some drivers of the 66th Battery, with three of Buller’s staff, including Lieutenant Frederick Roberts, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, reached the guns under a hail of fire and got two away, but Roberts was mortally wounded.

Where Freddie Roberts was wounded

Where Freddie Roberts was wounded

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 27160, Page:689,  reads:

“The Queen has been graciously pleased to signify Her intention to confer the decoration of the Victoria Cross on the undermentioned Officers and Non-Commissioned Officer, whose claims have been submitted for Her Majesty’s approval, for their conspicuous bravery at the battle of Colenso, as stated against their names:—

The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own), Captain W. N. Congreve

At Colenso on the 15th December, 1899, the detachments serving the guns of the 14th and 66th Batteries, Royal Field Artillery, had all been either killed, wounded, or driven from their guns by Infantry fire at close range, and the guns were deserted.

About 500 yards behind the guns was a donga in which some of the few horses and drivers left alive were sheltered. The intervening space was swept with shell and rifle fire.

Captain Congreve, Rifle Brigade, who was in the donga, assisted to hook a team into a limber, went out; and assisted to limber up a gun. Being wounded, he took shelter; but, seeing Lieutenant Roberts fall, badly wounded, he went out again and brought him in. Captain Congreve was shot through the leg, through the toe of his boot, grazed on the elbow and the shoulder, and his horse shot in three places.

Lieutenant the Honourable F. H. S. Roberts (since deceased). Lieutenant Roberts assisted Captain Congreve. He was wounded in three places.

66th Battery, Royal Field Artillery, Corporal G. E. Nurse, Corporal Nurse also assisted.

7th Battery, Royal Field Artillery, Captain H. L. Reed. Captain Reed, who had heard of the difficulty, shortly afterwards brought down three teams from his battery to see if he could be of any use. He was wounded, as were five of the thirteen men who rode with him, one was killed and thirteen out of twenty-one horses were killed before he got half-way to the guns, and he was obliged to retire. 

The grave of Freddie Roberts VC.

The grave of Frederick Roberts VC.

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© DRW 2011-2018. Created 04/11/2011. Added to Blog 03/01/2015. Image of Frederick Roberts grave by Eric Leach, Image of wounding plaque by Tony Wood. Taddy &Co cigarette card by Card Promotions, ©1997, first issued 1902. Edited 10/05/2017

Updated: 08/01/2018 — 08:02
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