George Leslie Drewry VC

George Leslie Drewry (03/11/1894 – 02/08/1918) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions  at V Beach in the Landing at Cape Helles, during the Gallipoli Campaign. on  25 April 1915.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29264, Page: 8132, reads:

Assisted Commander Unwin at the work of securing the lighters under heavy rifle and maxim fire. He was wounded in the head, but continued his work and twice subsequently attempted to swim from lighter to lighter with a line.” 

The men of HMS River Clyde connected to this action were: George Leslie Drewry, Wilfred St. Aubyn Malleson and George McKenzie Samson commanded by Acting Captain Edward Unwin.

He was accidentally killed at Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands, on 2 August 1918, and is buried in the City of London Cemetery, Manor Park, East London.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 21/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. Gallaher cigarette card by Card Promotions © 2001, first issued 1915. 

William Charles Williams VC

William Charles Williams (15/09/1880 – 25/04/1915) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the landings at Gallipoli in 1915.

The Citation reads:

“On 25 April 1915 during the landing on V Beach, Cape Helles, Gallipoli, Turkey, Williams, with three other men (George Leslie Drewry, Wilfred St. Aubyn Malleson and George McKenzie Samson) was assisting the commander (Edward Unwin) of their ship, HMS River Clyde (previously the SS River Clyde) at the work of securing the lighters. He held on to a rope for over an hour, standing chest deep in the sea, under continuous enemy fire. He was eventually dangerously wounded and later killed by a shell whilst his rescue was being effected by the commander who described him as the bravest sailor he had ever met.”

His body was lost in the carnage of Gallipoli, and he is Commemorated on Portsmouth Naval Memorial panel 8 column 1

 

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 28/02/2017

Frederick Harold Tubb VC

Frederick Harold Tubb (28/11/1881 – 20/09/1917)  was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 9 August 1915 at Lone Pine, Gallipoli, Turkey.

.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 29328 Page: 10154,  reads:

“For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty at Lone Pine trenches, in the Gallipoli Peninsula, on 9th August, 1915. In the early morning the enemy made a determined counter attack on the centre of the newly captured trench held by Lieutenant Tubb. They advanced up a sap and blew in a sandbag barricade, leaving only one foot of it standing, but Lieutenant Tubb led his men back, repulsed the enemy, and rebuilt the barricade. Supported by strong bombing parties, the enemy succeeded in twice again blowing in the barricade, but on each occasion Lieutenant Tubb, although wounded in the head and arm, held his ground with the greatest coolness and rebuilt it, and finally succeeded in maintaining his position under very heavy bomb fire.” 

He died from wounds received in battle at Polygon Wood, in the Third Battle of Ypres, on 20 September 1917. He is buried in  Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Maj. Frederick Harold Tubb VC.

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 19/01/2016. Image courtesy of Mark Green.  Gallaher cigarette card by Card Promotions © 2001. First issued 1916. 

Walter Richard Parker VC

Walter Richard Parker (20/09/1881- 28/11/1936) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at Gallipoli during the First World War. 

The Citation reads:

On the night of 30 April/1 May 1915 at Gaba Tepe, Gallipoli, Turkey, Lance-Corporal Parker, a volunteer stretcher-bearer, went out with a party of NCOs and men to take ammunition, water and medical stores to an isolated trench containing about 40 men and several wounded. There were no communication trenches leading to the trench, and several men had already been killed in an attempt to reach it.

After crossing an area of about 400 yards swept by machine-gun and rifle fire, Lance-Corporal Parker was alone, the rest of the party having been killed or wounded. On his arrival he gave assistance to the wounded and when the trench was finally evacuated early the next morning, he helped to remove and attend the casualties, although he himself was seriously wounded.”

He is buried in Stapleford Cemetery, Nottingham.

Walter Richard Parker VC 20/09/1881 - 28/11/1936 Stapleford Cemetery, Nottingham
Walter Richard Parker VC
20/09/1881 – 28/11/1936
Stapleford Cemetery, Nottingham

DRW © 2016-2020. Created 31/10/2016. Image by Mark Green

Herbert James VC. MC.

Herbert Walter James (30/11/1888 – 15/08/1958) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the First World War at Gallipoli. 

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of  Supplement: 29281, Page: 8700, reads:

“Second Lieutenant Herbert James, 4th Battalion, The Worcestershire Regiment.

 For most conspicuous bravery during the operations in the Southern Zone of the Gallipoli Peninsula. On the 28th June, 1915, when a portion of a Regiment had been checked owing to all the Officers being put out of action, Second Lieutenant James, who belonged to a neighbouring unit, entirely on his own initiative gathered together a body of men and led them forward under heavy shell and rifle fire. He then returned, organised a second party, and again advanced. His gallant example put fresh life into the attack. On the 3rd July, in the same locality, Second Lieutenant James headed a party of bomb throwers up a Turkish communication trench, and, after nearly all his bomb throwers had been killed or wounded, he remained alone at the head of the trench and kept back the enemy single-handed till a barrier had been built behind him and the trench secured. He was throughout exposed to a murderous fire.”

He was cremated and his ashes were interred at Kensal Green Cemetery in London

Herbert James VC 30/11/1888 - 15/08/1958 Kensall Green Crem, London

Kensal Green Cemetery, London.

DRW © 2016 – 2020. Created 15/08/2016, edited 11/05/2017. Gallaher cigarette card by Card Promotions, © 2003, first issued 1916.

Richard Raymond Willis VC.

Richard Raymond Willis (13/10/1876 – 09/02/1966) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during World War One at Gallipoli.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 29273, Page: 8395,  reads:

“His Majesty the KING has been graciously pleased to award the Victoria Cross to the undermentioned Officers, Non-commissioned Officer and man, in recognition of their most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty in the field: —

Captain Richard Raymond Willis, 1st Battalion, The Lancashire Fusiliers.

No. 1293 Serjeant Alfred Richards, 1st Battalion, The Lancashire Fusiliers.

No. 1809 Private William Keneally, 1st Battalion, The Lancashire Fusiliers.

On the 25th April, 1915, three Companies and the Headquarters of the 1st Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, in effecting a landing on the Gallipoli Peninsula to the West of Cape Helles, were met by a very deadly fire from hidden machine guns which caused a great number of casualties. The survivors, however, rushed up to and cut the wire entanglements, notwithstanding the terrific fire from the enemy, and, after overcoming supreme difficulties, the cliffs were gained and the position maintained.

Amongst the many very gallant Officers and men engaged in this most hazardous undertaking, Captain Willis, Serjeant Richards and Private Keneally have been selected by their comrades as having performed the most signal acts of bravery and devotion to duty”

Upon his death in 1966 he was cremated and his ashes were interred in the Garden Of Remembrance at Prestbury Cemetery in Cheltenham.

Maj. Richard Willis VC 1876-1966 Prestbury Cemetery, Cheltenham

 

The Cross of Sacrifice. Prestbury Cemetery, Cheltenham.
The Cross of Sacrifice. Prestbury Cemetery, Cheltenham.

DRW © 2015-2020. Created 09/08/2015, edited 02/05/2017

The Anzac Memorial in Weymouth

The ANZAC Memorial in on the Esplanade in Weymouth is one of two memorials within sight of each other, separated by the Garden of Remembrance.

 

A.I.F

IN MEMORY OF 

ANZAC VOLUNTEER TROOPS

WHO AFTER ACTION

AT GALLIPOLI IN 1915

PASSED THROUGH HOSPITALS

AND TRAINING CAMPS IN DORSET

N.Z.E.F

THESE ANZAC TROOOPS

LATER MOVED FROM DORSET

TO ACTION IN PALESTINE

AND THE WESTERN FRONT

 

 

THEY CAME FROM AFAR 

IN THE CAUSE OF FREEDOM

Google Earth co-ordinates are:  50.616830°  -2.451451°

DRW © 2013-2018. Created 19/06/2013. Moved to blog 08/03/2014, added inscriptions 11/08/2018