Tag: Brompton Cemetery

William Hope VC

William Hope (12/04/1834 – 17/12/1909) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War  on 18 June 1855 at Sebastopol,

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21997,  Page: 1578, reads:

“7th Regiment, Lieutenant William Hope, Date of Act of Bravery, 18th June, 1855.

After the troops had retreated on the morning of the 18th June, 1855, Lieutenant W. Hope being informed by the late Serjeant-Major William Bacon, who was himself wounded, that Lieutenant and Adjutant Hobson was lying outside the trenches badly wounded, went out to look for him, and found him lying in the old agricultural ditch running towards the left flank of the Redan. He then returned, and got four men to bring him in. Finding, however, that Lieutenant Hobson could not be removed without a stretcher, he then ran back across the open to Egerton’s Pit, where he procured one, and carried it to where Lieutenant Hobson was lying.
All this was done under a very heavy fire from the Russian batteries.”

William Hope passed away on 17th December 1909 in London, aged 75. He was buried in the family grave in Brompton Cemetery.

DRW © 2018. Created 13/08/2018. Image courtesy of Mark Green

Updated: 26/08/2018 — 19:26

Alfred Kirke Ffrench VC

Alfred Kirke Ffrench (25/02/1835 – 28/12/1872) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 16 November 1857 at Lucknow, India during the Indian Rebellion.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 22212, Page: 5513, reads:

“53rd Regiment, Lieutenant Alfred Kirke Ffrench. Date of Act of Bravery, 16th November, 1857.

For conspicuous bravery on the 16th of November, 1857, at the taking of the Secundra Bagb, Lucknow, when in command of the Grenadier Company, being one of the first to enter the building. His conduct was highly praised by the whole Company.
Elected by the Officers of the Regiment.”

He fell ill while on service in Bermuda in Autumn of 1872, and was invalided back to London to recuperate, but died on 28th December and was buried in Brompton Cemetery.

DRW © 2018. Created 11/08/2018. Image courtesy of Mark Green

Updated: 26/08/2018 — 19:27

Sir Frederick Francis Maude VC, GCB

Frederick Francis Maude (20/12/1821 –  20/06/1897) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean Campaign. 

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 658, reads:

“3rd Regiment, Bt. Lieut.-Colonel Frederick Francis Maude.

For conspicuous and most devoted bravery on the 8th September, 1855, when in command of the covering and Ladder Party of the 2nd Division, on the assault of the Redan, to which he gallantly led his men. Having entered the Redan, he, with only nine or ten men, held a position between traverses, and only retired when all hope of support was at an end, himself dangerously wounded.

He is buried in Brompton Cemetery in London.

© DRW 2013-2018. Created 02/02/2017, edited 04/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:31

Richard Wadeson. VC.

Richard Wadeson (31/07/1826 – 24/01/1885) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Indian Mutiny.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 22212, Page: 5518 reads:

“75th Regiment, Lieutenant Richard Wadeson, Date of Act of Bravery, 18th July, 1857.

For conspicuous bravery at Delhi on the 18th of July, 1857, when the Regiment was engaged in the Subjee Mundee, in having saved the life of Private Michael Farrell, when attached by a Sowar of the enemy’s Cavalry, and killing the Sowar.

Also, on the same day, for rescuing Private John Barry, of the same Regiment, when, wounded and helpless, he was attacked by a Cavalry Sowar, whom Lieutenant Wadeson killed.”

He died in 1885  and is buried in Brompton Cemetery in London.

Brompton Cemetery, London.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 22/09/2015.

Updated: 10/01/2018 — 07:53

Sir Charles Craufurd Fraser VC.

Charles Craufurd Fraser (31/08/1829 – 07/06/1895) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Indian Mutiny.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 22445, Page: 4126, reads:

“7th Hussars, (now of the Hussars), Major Charles Craufurd Fraser, Date of Act of Bravery, 31st December, 1858.

For conspicuous and cool gallantry, on the 31st December, 1858, in having volunteered, at great personal risk, and under a sharp fire of musketry, to swim to the rescue of Captain Stisted, and some men of the 7th Hussars, who were in imminent danger of being drowned in the River Raptee, while in pursuit of the rebels.

Major Fraser succeeded in this gallant service, although at the time partially disabled, not having recovered from a severe wound received while leading a Squadron in a charge against some fanatics, in the Action of Nawabgunge, on the 13th June, 1858.”

He is buried in Brompton Cemetery in London.

Brompton Cemetery, London.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 21/09/2015, edited 09/05/2017

Updated: 10/01/2018 — 07:54

William Cafe VC.

William Martin Cafe (26/03/1826 – 06/08/1906) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Indian Mutiny.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 22357, Page: 557, reads: 

“56th Bengal Native Infantry. Captain William Martin Cafe, Date of Act of Bravery, 15th April, 1858.

For bearing away, under a heavy fire, with the assistance of Privates Thompson, Crowie, Spence, and Cook, the body ol Lieutenant Willoughby, lying near the ditch of the Fort of Ruhya, and for running to the rescue of Private Spence, who had been severely wounded in the attempt.”

He is buried in Brompton Cemetery, London.

Brompton Cemetery, London.

© DRW 2015  – 2018. Created 21/09/2015, edited 09/05/2017

Updated: 10/01/2018 — 07:41

Francis Wheatley VC. DCM.

Francis Wheatley (1821 – 21/05/1865) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page:662, reads:

“1st Bat. Rifle Brigade, Private F. Wheatley,

For throwing a live shell over the parapet of the trenches.”

On 12 October 1854 Wheatley and some other Riflemen were occupying a section of the trenches before Sevastopol when a live Russian shell fell amongst the men. Without hesitation Wheatley seized hold of the shell and endeavoured to knock the fuse out with the butt of his rifle. He was unsuccessful at the first attempt and so, with great presence of mind and deliberation he managed somehow to heave it over the parapet of the trench. It had scarcely fallen outside when it exploded. Had it not been for his coolness, presence of mind and supreme courage and discipline, the shell would have inevitably exploded amongst the party causing serious casualties, but instead not a man was hurt”

He died on 21 May 1865 at Westminster Hospital, London from acute myelitis (inflammation of the spinal cord) and asphyxia, and is buried in Brompton Cemetery in London

Brompton Cemetery

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 21/09/2015, edited 09/05/2017

Updated: 10/01/2018 — 07:41

Samuel Parkes. VC

Samuel Parkes  (1815? – 15/11/1864) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions  during the Charge of the Light Brigade on 25 October 1854.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 655,  reads:

“4th Light Dragoons No. 635 Private Samuel Parkes

In the charge of the Light Cavalry Brigade at Balaklava, Trumpet-Major Crawford’s horse fell, and dismounted him, and he lost his sword; he was attacked by two Cossacks, when Private Samuel Parkes (whose horse had been shot) saved his life, by placing himself between them and the Trumpet-Major, and drove them away by his sword. In attempting to follow the Light Cavalry Brigade in the retreat, they were attacked by six Russians, whom Parkes kept at bay, and retired slowly, fighting, and defending the Trumpet-Major for some time, until deprived of his sword by a shot.”

There is confusion about his actual year of birth, according to the Army he declared his age on enlistment as 18, and his discharge papers confirm that he was born in 1813. However, his death certificate and the Brompton Cemetery burial register both say, that he was aged 49 at death, in which case he was born in 1815. 

He was buried in an unmarked grave in Brompton Cemetery in London, and in May 1999 a memorial stone was placed on his grave.

Samuel Parkes VC.

Samuel Parkes VC.

Brompton Cemetery

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 21/09/2015

Updated: 10/01/2018 — 07:42

Reginald Warneford VC.

Reginald Warneford was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the First World War

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 29189, Page: 5635, reads:

“The KING has been graciously pleased to approve of the grant of the Victoria Cross to Flight Sub-Lieutenant Reginald Alexander John Warneford, Royal Naval Air Service, for the conspicuous act of bravery specified below: —

For most conspicuous bravery on the 7th June, 1915, when he attacked and, singlehanded, completely destroyed a Zeppelin in mid-air. This brilliant achievement was accomplished after chasing the Zeppelin from the coast of Flanders to Ghent, where he succeeded in dropping his bombs on to it from a height of only one or two hundred feet. One of these bombs caused a terrific explosion which set the Zeppelin on fire from end to end, but at the same time overturned his Aeroplane and stopped the engine. In spite of this he succeeded in landing safely in hostile country, and after 15 minutes started his engine and returned to his base without damage.”

On 17 June 1915, Warneford received the award of the Légion d’honneur from the French Army Commander in Chief, General Joffre. Following a celebratory lunch, Warneford travelled to the aerodrome at Buc in order to ferry an aircraft for delivery to the RNAS at Veurne. Having made one short test flight, he then flew a second flight, carrying an American journalist, Henry Beach Newman, as passenger. During a climb to 200 feet, the right hand wings collapsed leading to a catastrophic failure of the airframe. Accounts suggest that neither occupant was harnessed and were both thrown out of the aircraft, suffering fatal injuries. In the case of Newman, death was instantaneous.

warneford02

He is buried in Brompton Cemetery in London.

© DRW. 2015 – 2018. Created 20/09/2015. Gallaher cigarette card reproduction by Card Promotions © 2001, first issued 1915.

Updated: 10/01/2018 — 07:42

Thomas Hancock VC.

Thomas Hancock (07/1822-12/03/1871) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Indian Mutiny.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 22083, Page: 178, reads:

“9th Lancers. Privates Thomas Hancock and John Purcell .

The guns, I am happy to say, were saved, but a waggon of Major Scott’s battery was blown up. I must not fail to mention the excellent conduct of a Sowar of the 4th Irregular Cavalry, and two men of the 9th Lancers, Privates Thomas Hancock and John Purcell, who, when my horse was shot down, remained by me throughout. One of these men and the Sowar offered me their horses, and I was dragged out by the Sowar’s horse. Private Hancock was severely wounded, and Private Purcell’s horse was killed under him. The Sowar’s name is Roopur Khan.”

(Extract of a letter from Brigadier J. H. Grant, C.B., Commanding Cavalry Brigade of the Field Force, to the Deputy Assistant-Adjutant General of Division. Dated Camp, Delhi, June 22, 1857.)

He was buried in an unmarked grave in Brompton Cemetery.  The grave has since been identified and a proper marker installed.

Thomas Hancock VC.

Thomas Hancock VC.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 19/09/2015, edited 04/05/2017

Updated: 10/01/2018 — 07:43
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