Tag: Belgium

Edward Warner VC

Edward Warner (18/11/1883 – 02/05/1915) was awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry during the defence of Hill 60, Ypres on 1 May 1915.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 29210, Page: 6270, reads:

No. 7602 Private Edward Warner, 1st Battalion, The Bedfordshire Regiment.

For most conspicuous bravery near ” Hill 60 ” on 1st May, 1915.

After Trench 46 had been vacated by our troops, consequent on a gas attack, Private Warner entered it single-handed in order to prevent the enemy taking possession.

Reinforcements were sent to Private Warner, but could not reach him owing to the gas. He then came back and brought up more men, by which time he was completely exhausted, but the trench was held until the enemy’s attack ceased.

This very gallant soldier died shortly afterwards from the effects of gas poisoning.”

He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, panel 31-33

 

Menin Gate. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 30/04/2017. Inscription image courtesy of Mark Green.  Cigarette card by Card Promotions © 2001, first issued 1915

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:11

Charles Fitzclarence VC

Charles Fitzclarence (08/05/1865 – 02/11/1914) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Anglo Boer War while serving in The Royal Fusiliers.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of 6 July 1900, Issue: 27208, Page: 4196, reads:

“The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), Captain Charles FitzCIarence.

On the 14th October, 1899, Captain FitzCIarence went with his squadron of the Protectorate Regiment, consisting of only partially trained men, who had never been in action, to the assistance of an armoured train which had gone out from Mafeking. The enemy were in greatly superior numbers, and the squadron was for a time surrounded, and it looked as if nothing could save them from being shot down. Captain FitzCIarence, however, by his personal coolness and courage inspired the greatest confidence in his men, and, by his bold and efficient handling of them, not only succeeded in relieving the armoured train, but inflicted a heavy defeat on the Boers, who lost 50 killed and a large number wounded, his own losses being 2 killed and 15 wounded. The moral effect of this blow had a very important bearing on subsequent encounters with the Boers.

On the 27th October, 1899, Captain FitzCIarence led his squadron from Mafeking across the open, and made a night attack with the bayonet on one of the enemy’s trenches. A hand-to-hand fight took place in the trench, while a heavy fire was concentrated on it from the rear. The enemy was driven out with heavy loss. Captain’ FitzCIarence was the first man into the position and accounted for four of the enemy with his sword. The British lost & killed and 9 wounded. Captain. FitzCIarence was himself: slightly wounded. With reference to these two actions, Major. General Baden-Powell states that had this Officer not shown an extraordinary spirit and fearlessness the attacks would have been failures, and we should have suffered heavy loss both in men and prestige. On the 26th December, 1899, during the action at Game Tree, near Mafeking, Captain FitzCIarence again distinguished himself by his coolness and courage and was again wounded (severely through both legs).” 

He was killed in action, aged 49, at Polygon Wood, Zonnebeke, Belgium, on 12 November 1914 whilst commanding the 1st Guards Brigade. He has no known grave and is Commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Panel 3.

Menin Gate. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

 © DRW 2017-2018. Created 30/04/2017. Inscription image courtesy of Mark Green. Taddy & Co cigarette card by Card Promotions, ©1997, first issued 1902. 

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:12

Frederick Fisher VC.

Frederick Fisher VC (03/08/1894 – 23/04/1915) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions  during the Second Battle of Ypres, on 22 April 1915 near St Julien, Belgium.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29202, Page: 6115, reads:

“No. 24066 Lance-Corporal Frederick Fisher, 13th Canadian Battalion.

On 23rd April, 1915, in the neighbourhood of St. Julien, he went forward with the machine gun, of which he was in charge, under heavy fire, and most gallantly assisted in covering the retreat of a battery, losing four men of his gun team.

Later, after obtaining four more men, he went forward again to the firing line and was himself killed while bringing his machine gun into action under very heavy fire, in order to cover the advance of supports.”

He was subsequently killed on April 23 while yet again bringing his machine-gun into action under very heavy fire. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres. Panel 24/26/28/30 

Menin Gate. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

 © DRW 2017-2018. Created 30/04/2017. Inscription image courtesy of Mark Green. 

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:12

Hugh McDonald McKenzie VC, DCM

Hugh McDonald McKenzie VC, DCM (05/12/1885 – 30/10/1917) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on the 30th of October 1917 at the Meetscheele Spur, near Passchendaele, Belgium.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of 12 February 1918, Supplement: 30523, Page: 2003, reads:

“Lt. Hugh Mackenzie, D.C.M., late Can. M.G. Corps.

For most conspicuous bravery and leading when in charge of a section of four machine guns accompanying the infantry in an attack.

Seeing that all the officers and most of the non-commissioned officers of an infantry company had become casualties, and that the men were hesitating before a nest of enemy machine guns, which were on commanding ground and causing them severe casualties, he handed over command of his guns to an N.C.O., rallied the infantry, organised an attack, and captured the strong point.

Finding that the position was swept by machine-gun fire from a ” pill-box ” which dominated all the ground over which the troops were advancing, Lt. Mackenzie made a reconnaissance and detailed flanking and frontal attacking parties which captured the “pill-box,” he himself being killed while leading the frontal attack.

By his valour and leadership this gallant officer ensured the capture of these strong points and so saved the lives of many. men and enabled the objectives to be attained.”

He has no known grave and is Commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres. Panel 35.

 

Menin Gate. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

 

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 30/04/2017. Inscription image courtesy of Mark Green. 

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:12

Sidney Clayton Woodroffe VC

Sidney Clayton Woodroffe (17/12/1895 – 30/07/1915) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 30 July 1915 at Hooge, Belgium.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette, of Supplement: 29286, Page: 8839, reads:

“His Majesty the KING has been graciously pleased to award the Victoria Cross to Second Lieutenant Sidney Clayton Woodroffe, late 8th Battalion, The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own).

 For most conspicuous bravery on 30th July, 1915, at Hooge.

The enemy having broken through the centre of our front trenches, consequent on the use of burning liquids, this Officer’s position was heavily attacked with bombs from the flank and subsequently from the rear, but he managed to defend his post until all his bombs were exhausted, and then skilfully withdrew his remaining men.

This very gallant Officer immediately led his party forward in a counter-attack under an intense rifle and machine-gun fire, and was killed whilst in the act of cutting the wire obstacles in the open.”

He has no known grave and is commemorated at The Menin Gate Ypres Memorial. Panel 46/48/50. 

Menin Gate. Image courtesy of Ralph McLean and the South African War Graves Project

 

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 30/04/2017. Inscription image courtesy of Mark Green. 

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:12

Frederick Youens VC

Frederick Youens (14/08/1892 – 07/07/1917) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 7 July 1917 near Hill 60, Belgium.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 30215, Page: 7906, reads:

“L.I. For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty.

While out on patrol this officer was wounded and had to return to his trenches to have his wounds dressed. Shortly afterwards a report came in that the enemy were preparing to raid our trenches. 2nd Lt. Youens, regardless of his wound, immediately set out to rally the team of a Lewis Gun, which had become disorganised owing to heavy shell fire. During this process an enemy’s bomb fell on the Lewis Gun position without exploding. 2nd Lt. Youens immediately picked it up and hurled it over the parapet. Shortly afterwards another bomb fell near the same place; again 2nd Lt. Youens picked it up with the intention of throwing it away, when it exploded in his hand, severely wounding him and also some of his men. There is little doubt that the prompt and . gallant action of 2nd Lt. Youens saved several of his men’s lives and that by his energy and resource the enemy’s raid was completely repulsed.

This gallant officer has since succumbed to his wounds.”

He is buried in Railway Dugouts Burial Ground, Belgium.

DRW © 2017-2018. Created 26/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green.

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:05

John Kendrick Skinner VC, DCM

John Kendrick Skinner (05/02/1883 – 17/03/1918) was awarded the Victoria Cross during the Battle of Passchendaele on 18 August 1917 at Wijdendrift, Belgium.

The Citation, recorded by the London Gazette of 14 September 1917, Supplement: 30284, Page: 9533, reads:

No, 6895 Sjt. (Actg. C.S./M.) John Skinner, K.O. Sco. Bord. (Pollokshields, Glasgow.)

For most conspicuous bravery and good leading.

Whilst his company was attacking, machine gun fire opened on the Left flank, delaying the advance. Although C.S./M. Skinner was wounded in the head, he collected six men, .and with great courage and determination worked round the left flank of three blockhouses from which the machine gun fire was coming, and succeeded in bombing and taking the first blockhouse single-handed; then, leading his six men towards the other two blockhouses, he skilfully cleared them, taking sixty prisoners, three machine guns, and two trench mortars. The dash and gallantry displayed by this warrant officer enabled’ the objective to be reached.” 

He was killed in action at Vlamertinghe, Belgium, on 17 March 1918, and is buried Vlamertinghe New Miliitary Cemetery, Belgium.

© DRW 2017-2018, created 26/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. 

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:05

Clement Robertson VC

Clement Robertson (15/12/1890 – 04/10/1917) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at Zonnebeke, Belgium, On 4 October 1917.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of 14 December 1917, Supplement: 30433, Page: 13222, reads:

“2nd Lieutenant Clement Robertson, late R.W. Surrey R., Special Reserve (T./Lieutenant, A./Captain, Tank Corps).

For most conspicuous bravery in leading his Tanks in attack under heavy shell, machinegun and rifle fire, over ground which had been heavily ploughed by shell fire. Captain Robertson, knowing the risk of the Tanks missing the way, continued to lead them on foot, guiding them carefully and patiently towards their objective, although-he must have known that his action would almost inevitably cost him his life.

This gallant officer was killed after his objective had been reached, but his skilful leading had already ensured successful action.

His utter disregard of danger and devotion to duty afford an example of outstanding valour.”

He is buried in Oxford Road Cemetery,  Ypres, Belgium.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 26/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green.

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:05

Francis Aylmer Maxwell VC, CSI, DSO

Francis Aylmer Maxwell (07/09/1871 – 21/09/1917) Was awarded the Victoria Cross while attached to Roberts’s Light Horse during the Second Boer War On 31 March 1900 at Sanna’s Post (aka Korn Spruit), South Africa.

(67) FA Maxwell VC.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 27292, Page: 1649, reads:

“Lieutenant Maxwell was one of three Officers not belonging to “Q” Battery, Royal Horse Artillery, specially mentioned by Lord Roberts as having shown the greatest gallantry, and disregard of danger, in carrying out the self-imposed duty of saving the guns of that Battery during the affair at Korn Spruit on 31st March, 1900.

This Officer went out on five different occasions and assisted, to bring in two guns and three limbers, one of which he, Captain Humphreys, and some Gunners, dragged in by hand.

He also went out with Captain Humphreys and  Lieutenant Stirling to try to get the last gun in, and remained there till the attempt was abandoned.

During a previous Campaign (the Chitral Expedition of’ 1895) Lieutenant Maxwell displayed gallantry in the removal of the body of Lieutenant-Colonel F. D. Battye, Corps of Guides, under fire, for which, though recommended, he received no reward.”

Major Edmund Phipps-Hornby, Sergeant Charles Parker, Gunner Isaac Lodge and Driver Horace Glasock also earned the Victoria Cross in this action.

He was killed by a German sniper, at Ypres on 21 September 1917 while commanding the 27th Brigade, 9th (Scottish) Division, and is buried in Ypres Reservoir Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium.

DRW ©2017-2018. Created 26/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. Taddy cigarette card by Card Promotions © 1997 first issued 1902.

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:06

John Lynn VC, DCM

John Lynn (1887 – 03/05/1915) while serving as a private in the 2nd Battalion, The Lancashire Fusiliers, was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 2 May 1915 near Ypres, Belgium.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 29210, Page: 6270, reads: 

“No. 1272 Private John Lynn, 2nd Battalion, The Lancashire Fusiliers.

For most conspicuous bravery near Ypres on 2nd May, 1915. When the Germans were advancing behind their wave of asphyxiating gas, Private Lynn, although almost overcome by the deadly fumes, handled his machine gun with very great effect against the enemy, and when he could not see them he moved his gun higher up on the parapet, which enabled him to bring even more effective fire to bear, and eventually checked any further advance.

The great courage displayed by this soldier had a fine effect on his comrades in the very trying circumstances.

He died the following day from the effects of gas poisoning”

He is buried in Grootbeek Cemetery, Belgium. His grave is inscribed “Who was buried at the time in Vlamertinghe but whose grave was destroyed in later battles. “

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 25/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:06
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