The Ross and the Woltemade

When it comes to talking about salvage tugs two names really stand out: the John Ross and the Wolraad Woltemade. 

The John Ross was built in Durban in at the James Brown & Hamer yard in 1976 and was named after Charles Rawden Maclean. Her principle dimensions are: overall length of 94,60m, breadth: 15,80m, depth: 8,60m, draft: 7,50m. She is of 2.918 Tons GRT and 875 Tons NRT.

I was fortunate enough to see her in East London in 1990, and I was very impressed. Unfortunately I was limited in how many pics I could take of her.

She was renamed Smit Amandla (callsign ZTUG) from December 2003. 

The Wolraad Woltemade was built at the Henry Robb shipyards in Leith for Safmarine. She was handed over to her new owners in 1976 and was named after Wolraad Woltemade

Wolraad Woltemade
Wolraad Woltemade

I saw her in Cape Town in 1990, although the images I took were not great due to the early morning gloom. 

Sadly she was broken up in 2010. 

There are 1/1250 scale (1,2 x 7,6 x 2,0 cm) models of the Ross and Woltemade available and they are in nylon and unfinished although there are a variety of different finishes and colours to choose from but I took a low res because I really wanted to see what the the output from a 3D printer looked like. 

Unbuilt

What were they like? I battled to get a smooth surface on them, sanding did not seem to work and in the end multiple coats of paint were the easiest. I also battled to get anything to stick to them. The mast of the Woltemade was a battle and the end result is really just a compromise. They are nice models though, esp the Ross.

Almost done

The Ross and Woltemade were the most powerful salvage tugs in the world when they were built and were involved in a number of marine casualties. They are true South African marine icons.

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 01/10/2016

Tugs of my past (2) 1980’s builds

Continuing where we left off from page 1

This page deals with the 1980’s built tugs, and once again I may not have images of all of the vessels as I was in Durban more than elsewhere. 

The first group are the 1980 built Voith Schneider tractor tugs.

Name Built Bollard pull Length Breadth Draft
Ben Schoeman (Shiraz) 1980 43 ton 35,6 11,0 5,69
W.H. Andrag (Chardonnay) 1980 43 ton 35,6 11,0 5,69
Paul Sauer (Pinotage) 1980 43 ton 35,6 11,0 5,69
Lourens Muller (Merlot) 1980 43 ton 35,6 11,0 5,69

Ben Schoeman
Ben Schoeman
Lourens Muller
Lourens Muller

The next group are the vessel’s that I saw the most in Durban, all are twin Schottel tractor tugs with the exception of Ibhayi that was a twin Z Peller pusher tug that was bought in Hong Kong due to a shortage of tugs at the time. She has only just recently (mid 2016) been laid up. 

Name Built Bollard pull Length Breadth Draft
 Otto Buhr (Umzumbe)  1982  39 Ton 32,5   9,5  6.07
 Jannie Oelofsen  (Nononti)  1982  41 ton  32,5  9,5  6,07
 Bertie Groenewald (Umvoti)  1983  40 ton 32,5   9,5  6,07
 Dupel Erasmus (Umsunduzi)  1983  40 ton  32,5  9,5  6,07
 Piet Aucamp (Inyalazi)  1984  34 ton  32,5  9,5  6,07
 Bart Grove (Umhlali)  1985  34 ton  32,5  9,5  6,07
 Ibhayi  1983 38 ton   28,608    3,70

 

Otto Buhr
Otto Buhr
Bertie Groenewald
Bertie Groenewald
Jannie Oelofsen
Jannie Oelofsen
Dupel Erasmus
Dupel Erasmus
Piet Aucamp
Piet Aucamp
Bart Grove
Bart Grove
Ibhayi
Ibhayi (Image courtesy of Dayle at SA Transport)

The PG Joubert and JA Kruger are also worth mentioning because I do have a pic of the Joubert that was taken one night. Unfortunately neither feature on my list and I do not know when they were built. They were subsequently transferred to Namport and renamed Ondjaba (J.A.Kruger) and Omanda (P.G.Joubert).

PG Joubert

 There were  a series of twin screw workboats that were built by Dorman Long which operated in the ports. The two I am more familiar with were the Blue Jay in Port Elizabeth and the Reier in Durban.

Name Built Bollard pull Length Breadth Draft
Reier  1983  11 ton  19,5  5,5  3,0
Blue Jay  1983  11 ton  19,5  5,5  3,0
Strandloper  1983  11 ton  19,5  5,5  3,0
Kestrel  1983  11 ton  19,5  5,5  3,0

Reier (Durban)
Reier (Durban)
Blue Jay Port Elizabeth
Blue Jay: (Port Elizabeth)

The technical data for these posts comes from a 2001 document on craft dispositions.

Measurements are in metres.  Ibhayi images courtesy of Dayle Coombe, info on Ibhayi by Greg Stone and George Meyer.

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 26/09/2016

Tugs of my past (1) 1970’s builds

I have always liked tugboats, and South Africa had some amazing steam powered vessels that are still admired by tug buffs long after they have passed on. In this series I am going to finally make a bit more sense of the tugs I grew to know during my time visiting Durban harbour. I do not have pics of each vessel but will do my best. Some of these tugs are no longer around, so these pics are really in memory of them.

The first group is the 1974 built Twin Voith Schneider tugs of which there were 4.

Name Built Bollard pull Length Breadth Draft
W. Marshall Clarke (Uhuva) 1974 43 ton 35,95 11.0 5.04
Jan Haywood (Indwa) 1974 43 ton 35,95 11.0 5.04
R.H. Tarpey (Uzavolo) 1974 43 ton 34.3 8.85  3.94
J.H. Botha (Ibhaku) 1974 43 ton 35.95 11.03 5.04

 

J H Botha
R H Tarpey
R H Tarpey
Jan Haywood
Jan Haywood

I do not seem to have an image of the Marshall Clarke, although there was a commerically available slide featuring her.

W Marshall Clarke
W Marshall Clarke

These tugs were based in Cape Town when I was ship hunting which is why I have so few images of them. Uhuva (now known as RB1) and Uzavolo (now known as RB3) are still active in Richards Bay (2016) while the Haywood and Botha were broken up around 2012.  

There were three other tugs built in 1976/7 that I have never seen or photographed so cannot display any images of them. All three are twin unit Voith Schneider. 

Name Built Bollard pull Length Breadth Draft
Jutten 1976 43 ton 37,3 11.0 5,29
Marcus 1976 43 ton 37,3 11,0  5,29
Meeuw 1977 43 ton 37,3 11,0 52,9

Two other 1970 builds I photographed in Port Elizabeth. These are Twin X Peller pusher tugs. There were actually three similar vessels, the third being the PJ Conradie, she was transferred to Walvis Bay in February 2001 and now is a part of Namport.  I do not have a photograph of her. The three sisters were built by Niigate Shipbuilding & Repair – Niigata, Japan.  

Name Built Bollard pull Length Breadth Draft
 PJC Du Plessis (Brenton) 1977 31 ton 35,02 9.02 4,13 
 Kobus Loubscher (Imonti) 1977 31 ton 35,02 9.02   4,13
 PJ Conradie (Mbabala) (1977?) (31 ton?) (35,02??) (9.02?) (4,13?)

PJC Du_Plessis
PJC Du_Plessis
Brenton (image  courtesy of Dayle Coombe of SA-Transport)
Brenton (image courtesy of Dayle Coombe of SA-Transport)
Kobus Loubscher
Kobus Loubscher
Imonti (image by Dayle Coombe of SA-Transport)
Imonti (image courtesy of Dayle Coombe of SA-Transport)

The last two of this group are my personal favourites and I saw them in Durban, they now live in East London and are still in service at the time of writing. The Coenie was the first tug that I ever sailed on. Both are Twin Z Peller tractor tugs

Name Built Bollard pull Length Breadth Draft
Coenie De Villiers (Umthwalume) 1978 43 ton 35,62 11.0 5,56 
Dirk Coetsee (Mpunzi) 1978 43 ton 35,62 11.0 5,56

Coenie De Villiers and Dirk Coetsee
Coenie De Villiers and Dirk Coetsee
Coenie De Villiers
Coenie De Villiers
Either the Coenie of the Dirk. Probably the latter.
Either the Coenie of the Dirk. Probably the latter.

This way to Tugs of my past (2) 1980’s builds

The technical data for these posts comes from a 2001 document on craft dispositions. Measurements are in metres.  Brenton and Imonti images courtesy of Dayle Coombe,  Info on Tarpey and sisters by Ken Malcolm. Info on PJ Conradie by George Meyer and Anton Scheepers.

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 25/09/2016

10BR-750 Plinthed at Roodepoort Station

This locomotive stands in the grounds of Roodepoort Station, surprisingly it is in a reasonably good condition, given the decline in the area in general. Unfortunately hawkers have taken root, erecting plastic roofs and using the cab as a storage area.

The loco, a class 10BR, (one of 15), was built in 1910 at the North British Loco Company Ltd. and went into service in 1910.

It was withdrawn in 1972, Unfortunately the information plaque is obscured by a large piece of plastic which makes it impossible to read completely, but the plaque identifies this loco as being number 750. This loco is over a century old!

When I took these pics in 2009 she was already looking bad, I would hate to know what she looks like now. Google Earth has a 2014 image of her and she was still there at that point but was covered in graffiti. The co-ordinates are:   26° 9.554’S,   27° 52.183’E.

© DRW © 2009-2018. Originally created 08 February 2009. Moved to blog 07/03/2016.

British Rail Class 08 Shunter

The British Rail Class 08 diesel shunter  is not in line to win a prize for looks. But then they were built as functional workhorses and not as beauty contestant entrants. There are quite a lot of them in heritage rail, although out of a class of 996 it is nice to see some survivors.

"Howie" (Eastleigh)
“Howie” (Eastleigh)
08377. (Mid Hants Railway)
08377. (Mid Hants Railway)

Chasewater Railway was where I managed to get a good look at the 08. They have 3 of them at the railway, and one was being used to pull a train.

08598 (Chasewater Railway)
08598 (Chasewater Railway)
08202 (Chasewater Railway)
08202 (Chasewater Railway)
D3429 (Chasewater Railway)
D3429 (Chasewater Railway)
D3429 (Chasewater Railway)
D3429 (Chasewater Railway)

The Class 08 was never meant as a speed merchant, and I have always felt they looked top heavy, however, they are now quite rare and worthy of heritage status too. There are a number of them in the railway modelling genre too and in a variety of liveries.

"N" Gauge Class 08
“N” Gauge Class 08

There are a number of them based at the Freightliner depot inside Southampton Harbour, but I was never able to get a decent image of any of them.

© DRW 2016-2018 Created 27/10/2015

South African Railways: Class 6E

For some strange reason the class 6E and 6E1 electric locomotive of the South African Railways has a large following, and I suspect the unique whine that they make from their resistor blowers is part of the attraction.

E163 Germiston
E1637, E1228 and E1416 in Germiston

These units have been in service for many years already, and they are the most numerous loco class in South Africa,  I am not an expert on them though, I am just an admirer. The definitive work (for want of a better description) may be found at the Class 6E page at Wikipedia.  The more numerous class 6E1 went on to have 11 different variants and there is a Wikipedia page dedicated to each variant.

6E1's Maraisburg
E1726 and friends.

All were built locally by Union Carriage and Wagon and most served with the South African Railways although a few were built for private use. 1041 were built in total.

E1267 Germiston
E1267. Germiston

There are a number of colour schemes out there, ranging from gulf red through to orange, purple and blue, although most purists would argue that the gulf red variant was the best livery.  Unfortunately I came into rail photography very late so have very few pictures of them, and most of the images I do have show a declining fleet in various stages of paintwork.

A trio of 6E1's
A trio of 6E1’s

The front two 6E1’s have the original diamond pantographs, while the gulf red unit has the newer style pantograph. Strangely enough she was still in her original livery as late as 2010.

6E-1678 Hamberg
E1678 and friends. (Hamberg)
E1558 and E1433. Germiston
E1411 and friends. Braamfontein
E1411 and friends. Braamfontein

Sadly the 6E and 6E1 are in danger of extinction as they get phased out in favour of more modern traction or are converted into what is now the Class 18E. This conversion robs them of their dual cabs in favour of “private facilities” for female drivers; and frankly that blanked out window does not do much for their looks.  I expect that the Class 18E will soldier on for many years as well, seeing that they are really converted from a good solid bit of design.

18405 Germiston
18405 (Germiston)

The 6E1 was also used as the locomotive on the now defunct “Metroblitz” high speed train that used to run between Pretoria and Johannesburg in the early 1980’s, and of course a specially adapted 6E1 with a nosecone was used to push the speed record for the Cape Gauge.

6E1 in Krugersdorp
6E1 in Krugersdorp

From a model railway point of view the 6E/6E1 never really entered the realm of the modeling fraternity. Many years ago, Italian manufacturer LIMA produced a series of South African Railways rolling stock and at the time they used a 5E/5E1 (E444 (Blue Train) and E919) as the “role model”. The 5E and all of its variants is really the granddaddy of the electric units that we knew so well in South Africa, and 555 were built in total.

E919 (LIMA HO Gauge)
E919 (LIMA HO Gauge)

These poor reproductions have really become collectors pieces and their prices are shocking.

Recently Scalecraft in South Africa was producing some excellent SAR models and while I know there is an 18E amongst their locomotives I am not too sure if the same can be said about the 5E/5E1/6E/6E1 variants.

It is also possible to get a very nice static 5E (although it is marked as a 6E) from Del Prado which included it as part of their Locomotives of the World series of partworks.

Del Prado static "6E" (N Gauge)
Del Prado static “6E” (N Gauge)

Sadly, I may never see one of these beauts ever again, although they will live on in my memory and in some of the videos that I managed to capture of that famous whine. When I was young I never really wanted to drive a steam engine, I really wanted to drive an electric loco, but I never did.

The 6E1 and her family were part of what made the former SAR work, they were the workhorses of the long distance train, and there was something comforting about watching them come into a station pulling a load of saloons behind them with a capable driver and his assistant at the controls, and of course part of going on holiday was sticking your head out the window and watching the units in front driving headlong. Ah, I can hear them from here!

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 20/10/2015

British Rail Class 43 HST.

I saw my first Class 43 in Bristol in 2015, and I have to admit I was not sure whether to be impressed or nonchalant about it. As far as I was concerned they were not visually very attractive, but I have to admit, their longevity has been quite amazing.  I have since done 2 trips on trains where they provided motive power, and I did enjoy the experience of hurtling along, although I think my Pendolino trip in 2008 was much more enjoyable.

The most sightings that I have done have been in Reading and in Bristol, and I am hoping one day to get decent pics of the new green liveried 43’s used by the Great Western Railways (formerly First Great Western). The only other odd livery I have seen so far have been Cross Country liveried engines.

This is my collection.

43194 (Bristol)
43194 (Bristol)
43156 (Chippenham)
43156 (Chippenham)
43131 (Reading)
43131 (Reading)
Unknown number (Chippenham)
Unknown number (Chippenham)
43197 (Reading)
43197 (Reading)
The front “office”
43384 (Bristol)
43384 (Bristol)
43301 (Birmingham)
43301 (Birmingham)

And what of the future?

43171 (back), 43187 (front) (Bristol)
43171 (back), 43187 (front) (Bristol)

In early October 2015 I saw my first rebranded FGW train which had returned to the original Great Western Railway brand and in the new green livery. It did lend a certain gravitas to these veteran engines.

43187 in GWR livery
43187 in GWR livery

In 2017, I spotted 43187 again en route to Paddington, and she had been rebranded as “The Welshman”

And on the 17th I saw another rebranding exercise.

43144 (Bristol)
43144 (Bristol)

Unfortunately the Class 43 may be counting the days, the electrification of the line between Reading and London and further will mean snazzy new electric traction, but somehow I suspect the 43’s will soldier on for awhile still, at any rate they are expected to be around at least till 2019.

4 x HST’s at London Paddington in April 2017

It is worth remembering that the prototype InterCity 125 (power cars 43000 and 43001) set the world record for diesel traction at 143 mph (230 km/h) on 12 June 1973, and an HST also holds the world speed record for a diesel train carrying passengers. 194 of the 197 locomotives built remain in service and that in itself has to be some sort of record.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 19/10/2015. Added new image 25/03/2017, 09/04/2017

34-099 and 34-466

One fine day in Magaliesburg, while waiting for the Reefsteamers train to leave, a pair of diesels arrived with cement trucks which they stacked in lines next to the train before being decoupled. It appeared as if 34-466 had broken down and both were shunted into a siding and shut down. 

34-466
34-099
34-099

 

© DRW 2010-2018. Created 15/04/2015, more images added 09/01/2018

MV Infanta

It was very rare that we got a visit to a Safmarine vessel, and when the invitation came to visit the Infanta in Durban we jumped at the chance. Unfortunately I do not have a date for the visit, but I suspect it may have been at the same time as our Thor 1 visit. (01/05/1988) as I have an image of Infanta taken from Thor 1.

Infanta alongside
Infanta alongside

The image above may have been taken in 1988 too. I do recall she had a very long gangway and one of the people visiting with us went backwards down the gangway. She was very well appointed inside and her crew facilities were excellent. The ship was built in 1983 as MS Taurus (OIPU, LR/IMO 8122830) for Finland Steamship Company Ltd and that could explain her accommodation. Initially I did not find out too much on the ship, but I was contacted by Hans Heesakkers in December 2016 who pointed me to where I could find more information and close the book on her.

She did have a long life (and a number of names and owners) and was finally sent to the breakers in 2013 under the name Aalborg. Her sister: Recife, similarly has a history page, and she too was broken up in 2013.  

The following information about the Infanta was kindly sent to me by Cameron Mackenzie:

O.N. (18360-Li) 17848-88/IMO 8122830 Call Sign: 3EHE6 Port of Registry: Panama.

Tonnage: 24 518g/11 709n/37 425 S.Dwt Dim: 182,5 x 29,5 x 16,00 m / Draught Maximum 11,53 m. 5 Hold (9 hatch, 1 x single/4 x twin) general purpose ice strengthened 1104 TEU vessel fitted with 1 x 35/4 x 25t cranes, strengthened for heavy cargoes. Grain Capacity 42 012m³ / Bale Capacity 40 276m³

Engines: two stoke single acting – 6 cylinder 660 x 1400 Sulzer 6RLB66 12 820bhp (9 430 kW) Four blade controllable pitch propeller – 15 knots – 35,5 tonne fuel/d. 114 mt (do) / 1802 mt (hvf) Engine built by Sumitomo Heavy Industry Ltd., Tamashima/Japan. Fitted with 1 x 1080 kW shaft generator/2 x 1000 kW diesel generators.

01/12/1982 Keel laid as “TAURUS” (Y.N. 84) by Nippon Kokan K.K., Tsu/Japan for Finska Angfartygs A/B (EFFOA) (Finland Steamship Company Ltd.) Helsinki/Finland.

25/02/1983 Launched.

01/07/1983 Completed by builders Nippon Kokan K.K. Tsu/Japan as “TAURUS” (FIN) (Y.N. 84) (Call Sign: OIPU) for Finska Angfartygs A/B (EFFOA) (Finland Steamship Co. Ltd.,) Helsinki/Finland. Under the management of Oy Finncarriers AB Helsingfors/Finland.

1987 Transferred to Bahama registry, same name “TAURUS” (BHS).

20/01/1988 Acquired by South African Marine Corp. Ltd., Cape Town for $16 million from EFFOA and placed under the ownership of Argonaut Shipping Company Inc., Cayman Islands, renamed “INFANTA” (PAN) in Lisbon.

09/02/1988 Arrived in East London ex-Lisbon dry-dock to commence loading for the Safbank (S.A. – U.S.A) Service.

13/12/1994 Sold to mainland Chinese interests for $14,5m. Dry-docked 16-17/11/1994 in Bethship Beaumont, USA for inspection and handed over 16/12/1994 to Sinotrans (Wah Tung Shipping Agency Co. Ltd., Hong Kong), under ownership of Great Trans Shipping Inc., Panama, renamed “GREAT TRANS” (PAN).

1999 Time chartered to Egon Oldendorff/Lübeck/Germany, renamed “LEOPOLD OLDENDORFF” (HKG) , and transferred to Hong Kong registry, under ownership Great Trans Shipping Inc., Hong Kong.

04/2001 Renamed “GREAT TRANS” (HKG) by Great Trans Shipping Inc., Hong Kong.

24/07/2001 Sold to Navalmar (UK) Ltd. (,Navalmar (UK) Ltd., manager) London and renamed “TAURUS” (GBR).

04/2003 Transferred to Cayman Island registry, same named, “TAURUS (CYM).

06/2005 Transferred to Panamanian registry, under ownership of Kensington Shipping Corporation, same name “TAURUS” (PAN).

06/2005 Sold by Navalmar (UK) Ltd., Cayman Islands to Filscan Shipping Inc., Manila/Philippines (Roymar Ship Management Inc., TBS Ship Management Inc.,) and renamed “MAYA PRINCESS”(PHL) under Philippine registry.

13/03/2007 Transferred to Panamanian registry under ownership of Kensington Shipping Corporation, same name “MAYA PRINCESS” (PAN).

14/03/2007 Sold by Filscan Shipping Inc., Manila/Philippines to Dannebrog Rederi A/S, Rungstedt Kyst, (Dannebrog Rederi A/S, manager) Denmark) under ownership of Kensington Shipping Corp. Gibraltar (British), and renamed “AALBORG” (GIB).

20/10/2009 Management transferred to MACS Maritime Carrier Shipping, Hamburg/Germany.

10/01/2010 Management transferred to Vineta Bereederungs MBH, Hamburg/Germany.

13/04/2013 Arrived Alang/India having been sold for demolition. 15/04/2013 Beached and dismantling commenced.

 

Taken from another ship
Taken from another ship
Ready to go on board for our visit
Ready to go on board for our visit

I was not able to visit her sister Recife, although she was somewhat of a regular in and out of Durban.  

Once again Cameron Mackenzie provided me with the following on Recife:

O.N. (18347-NY) 18244-89 / IMO 8122828 Call Sign: 3EGR6 Port of Registry: Panama

Tonnage: 1988 – 24 891g/11 816n/37 425 S.Dwt. 1996 – 25 005g/10 741n/37 425 D.Dwt. Dim: 182,5 x 29,5 x 16,00 m / Draught Maximum 11,53 m

Eng: two stoke single acting – 6 cylinder 660 x 1400 Sulzer 6RLB66 12 820bhp (9 430 kW) Four blade controllable pitch propeller – 15 knots – 35,5 tonne fuel/d. Fuel 114 mt(do) / 1802 mt(hvf). Engine built by Sumitomo Heavy Industry Ltd., Tamashima/Japan. Fitted with 1 x 1080 kW shaft generator/2 x 1000 kW generators. 1104 TEU vessel fitted with 1 x 35/4 x 25t cranes, strengthened for heavy cargoes. Grain Capacity 41 012m³ / Bale Capacity 40 276m³. 5 Hold (9 hatch, 1 x single/4 x twin) general purpose ice strengthened

27/04/1983 Keel laid as “TELLUS” (Y.N. 85) by Nippon Kokan K.K., Tsu/Japan for Finska Angfartygs A/B (EFFOA) (Finland Steamship Company Ltd.) Helsinki/Finland.

12/09/1983 Launched. 

31/01/1984 Completed by builders Nippon Kokan K.K. Tsu/Japan as “TELLUS” (Fi) (Y.N. 85) (Call Sign: OIPV) for Finska Angfartygs A/B (EFFOA) (Finland Steamship Co. Ltd.,) Helsinki/Finland. Under the management of Oy Finncarriers AB Helsingfors/Finland.

1987 Transferred to Bahama registry, same name “TELLUS” (BHS).

08/01/1988 Acquired by South African Marine Corporation. Ltd., Cape Town for $16 million from EFFOA and placed under the ownership of Argonaut Shipping Company Inc., Cayman Islands, renamed “RECIFE” (PAN) in New York.

31/01/1988 Arrived in Cape Town from New York on the Safbank (SA – U.S.A.) Service.

01/02/1988 Naming ceremony in Table Bay Harbour by sponsor Mrs Gillian Van As.

10/09/1991 Safbank Line announced that a fire on board the “RECIFE”(PAN) on 07/09/1991 is believed to have started in a sealed container. Spreading, causing damage to both ship and cargo. Fire sustained by ship’s personnel without injury, vessel proceeding to the scheduled port of Wilmington(USA), where ship and cargo will be surveyed. In the interest of cargo, the vessel’s owners have declared General Average.

12/1995 Transferred to Safbulk and commenced conversion into a tar carrier, installation of two 3000 mt cargo tanks for liquid pitch with heating coils fitted for carriage at 220ºc with a pump rate of 300mt/h.

09/02/1996 Renamed “NTABENI” (PAN) by Mrs. Judy Barbour, wife of Alusaf M.G. Rob Barbour, general cargo ship / tar carrier with 4 holds / 2 holds with wing tanks fitted with heating coils, 2 holds.

07/04/1999 Acquisition of South African Marine Corporation Ltd., Cape Town (SAFMAN)(Non-Liner Division) by Enterprises Shipping & Trading S.A. Piraeus/Greece, sale back dated to 01/01/1999, “NTABENI” (PAN) sold. 11/2000 Transferred to Niagara Marine S.A. (Enterprises Shipping & Trading S.A. Piraeus/Greece) Panama, same name “NTABENI” (PAN).

11/2001 Transferred to Wexford Maritime S.A. (Enterprises Shipping & Trading S.A. Piraeus/Greece) Panama, same name “NTABENI” (PAN).

27/03/2013 Arrived Alang/India for demolition. 28/03/2013 Beached Alang and dismantling commenced.

Sister ship Recife underway in Durban
Sister ship Recife underway in Durban

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 30/03/2015, updated 06/12/2016 and 18/12/2016. Special thanks for Cameron MacKenzie and Hans Heesakkers for additional information.