Category: South Africa

Kings Liverpool Regiments Boer War Memorial

The Kings Liverpool Regiments Boer Memorial may be found in St John’s Gardens, Liverpool. Google Earth co-ordinates  53.408902°,  -2.981613°

It commemorates the involvement of the regiment in the First and Second Anglo-Afghan Wars (1839-1842 and 1878-1880), Third Anglo-Burmese War; (1885-1886), and the Second Boer War (1899-1902).

It was unveiled on 9 September 1905, and attended by Field Marshall Sir George White VC GCB. It is a Grade II listed building. 

There are 355 names on the memorial, of which 179 tie into the Boer War. Unfortunately legibility of the names is poor.

Technically the memorial is not only a Boer War memorial but commemorates other campaigns that the Kings Liverpool Regiment were a part of.

The memorial is described as:

“Central pedestal surmounted by figure of Britannia. Pedestal is flanked by arching walls with figure of a serviceman at each end. Inscription on the plinth and walls Britannia stands with right hand raised whilst in her left she holds a spray of laurel and carries a round shield decorated with sea horses. On her head is a helmet topped by a ship’s prow with a sea horse crest. Bronze swags placed around the upper edge of the pedestal. A soldier of 1685 stands at the left end of the wall and a soldier of 1902 stands at the right end of the wall. Guns and other military equipment lie on the sloping step at the foot of the pedestal intermingled with wreaths and palms and covered with the union flag. Laurel wreath placed in front. At the rear of the memorial, on the pedestal, is the regimental badge, a sphinx and a laurel twig device. Below this is the figure of a drummer boy dressed in the uniform of 1743. He sits on a rock beating a call to arms. Behind him are banners, a cannon and a musket.”  (https://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorial/1285  © WMR-1285)

DRW © 2018. Created 11/06/2018

Updated: 13/06/2018 — 07:00

Arthur Herbert Lindsay Richardson VC.

Arthur Herbert Lindsay Richardson (23/09/1872 –  15/12/1932) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at Wolvespruit, about 15 miles north of Standerton, Transvaal, South Africa, on 5 July 1990.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 27229 Page: 5688, reads:

“Lord Strathcona’s Corps

Sergeant Arthur Herbert Lindsey Richardson

On the 5th July, 1900, at Wolve Spruit, about 15 miles north of Standerton, a party of Lord Strathcona’s Corps, only 38 in number, came into contact, and was engaged at close quarters, with a force of 80 of the enemy. 
When the order to retire had been given, Sergeant Richardson rode back under a very heavy cross-fire and picked up a trooper whose horse had been shot and who was wounded in two places and rode with him out of fire. 
At the time when this act of gallantry was performed, Sergeant Richardson was within 300 yards of the enemy, and was himself riding a wounded horse.”

He is buried in St James Cemetery, Liverpool, and the headstone is erected  on the patch of lawn between the cemetery entrance and Liverpool Anglican Cathedral

DRW © 2018. Created 05/06/2018.  Taddy &Co cigarette card by Card Promotions, ©1997, first issued 1902.

Updated: 05/06/2018 — 05:45

The “Gloria Victis” Memorial, Potchefstroom

O​n the terrain of the Reformed Church’s Theological School, in its South-Easterly corner,  stands a modest monument in the form of a three – and half meter high obelisk. ​ The lettering on the white marble is worn as a result of exposure to the elements through the years​.
 
 
but on closer inspection the following inscription can be read: 
“Ter gedachtenis aan de oud studenten en studenten van de Theologiese School der Gereformeerde Kerk in den oorlog 1899-1902, die hun leven gaven voor Vrijheid en voor Recht” 
KOMdt. Karel David COETZEE 
KOMdt. Calman Efraim LION-CACHET 
Jacob Philippus MARÉ 
Johannes Abraham VENTER 
Jan Christoffel KRUGER  
————————-
Roughly translated as: 
“in honour of students (of the original Theological School at Burgersdorp)
whom all served and died during the Second Anglo-Boer. 
They were all of the rank Commandant, in name: –
KOMdt. Karel David COETZEE 
KOMdt. Calman Efraim LION-CACHET 
Jacob Philippus MARÉ 
Johannes Abraham VENTER 
Jan Christoffel KRUGER  
 
Known as the  Gloria Victis” memorial, it was originally erected in front of the first Theological School building in Potchefstroom which was founded in 13 February 1905.  The memorial was unveiled on 24 March 1906 by Ds. W.J. De Klerk but it was later moved to its current position, presumably after the completion of the third school complex around about 1950. Current position is at GPS Coordinates -26.693507, 27.097163. 
 
 

Inscription


The “Teologiese Skool Potchefstroom (TSP)”  is where candidate pastors of the Reformed Church in South Africa are trained. It was originally founded In Burgersdorp (In the Free State) in 1869, and then moved to Potchefstroom in 1904, re-opening in 1905.
 
Once the Anglo Boer War commenced in 1899, the Theological School’s students (hailing from the two Boer Republics, the Transvaal and the Fee State) returned to their homes to take up arms (against the British), with fatal outcome for the five students whose names are inscribed on the memorial. After the war  ended in 1902, returning students of the Theological School decided to erect a monument to commemorate their fellow fallen students; and the associated costs for the memorial were funded by the students, and their mutual friends.
 
Further reading (Mostly in Afrikaans)
 
 DRW © 2018. Image and information by Diederik-Johannes Cloete. Two new images added 04/05/2018
 
Updated: 04/06/2018 — 06:21

Rand Revolt Casualty List

[ Braamfontein Cemetery ] [ Brixton Cemetery] [ East Rand and Elsewhere ]
[ Anzac Memorial in Brakpan] [ Casualty List ]

This list is really an attempt to make sense of the casualties of the Rand Revolt. It includes suicides, judicial executions, soldiers and civilians and is a work in progress.  Each name links to the applicable South African War Graves Project page. There are 84+ names in this list. 

Known casualties (graves and memorials)

South African Police.

Capt  Halse, Harry  (South End Cem, PE)
Head Const John Milne  (St John’s Walmer)
L/Sgt  McInroy, George (Braamfontein)
L/Sgt Joubert, Paulus Petrus (Primrose)
Const. Ackerman, Willem Hendrik (Not known)
Const. Coetzee, Hendrik Jacobus (Braamfontein)
Const. Du Plooy, Cornelius Johannes Frederik (Braamfontein)
Const. Fogarty, Jeremiah (Braamfontein)
Const. Geldenhuis, Jury Johannes (Springfontein Old Cemetery)
L/Sgt. Haefele, Gideon Frederick (Vanrynsdorp Cemetery)
Const. Naude, Jacobus Albertus Cornelius (Burial place not known)
Const. Swanepoel, Cornelius Jacob (Braamfontein)
Const. Smit, Peter Jacobus (Braamfontein)
Const. Steyn, Daniel Ronquest (Braamfontein)
Const. Tee, George Richard (Braamfontein)
Const. Van Heerden, Daniel Joachim (Boksburg Cemetery)
Const. Van Heerden, Hendrik Willem (Kroonstad Old Cemetery)
Const. Van Der Merwe, Jacobus Lodewicus (Elliott Cemetery)
Const. Vickers, Peter Francis Poplemberg (Braamfontein)
Const. Wehmeyer, Stephanus Gerhardus (Braamfontein)

Special Police (Anzac Memorial Brakpan)

Lieut Vincent Frederic. Brodigan
Special Const. S.J. Combrink
Special Const. T.H. Jordaan
Special Const. W.T. Corrigan
S/Const Combrink, SJ
Special Const.  Smit FH

ANZAC Memorial (Civilians)

Martin, H  (Mine Official)
Phillips. L  (Mine Official)
Momsen, AB  (Mine Official)
Lowden GW  (Mine Official)

South African Air Force

Capt. William Warren Carey-Thomas MC. (Voortrekker Hoogte)
Air Corporal W.H. Johns

Permanent Force

Lieut. G. Gordon-Gray  (Voortrekkerhoogte)
Lt Adrian Duck (SAMR)
S.M Instructor. T. Notman

Mass Grave Transvaal Scottish – Brixton

Capt. Henry Werner Backeberg 
Lt. Ethelbert Guy 
Cpl. Angus MacLeod 
Pte. Lawrence Froneman 
Pte. ES Goddard 
Pte. GF Ireland 
Pte. Richard Bateman Machan
Pte. FB Marshall 
Pte. Richard Blackstock Ovens

Transvaal Scottish not in Brixton mass grave

Lt. Gregorowski. Lennox Fyfe (Thaba Tshwane No1 Military Cem)
Major GAF Adam (Brixton Cem)
Sgt. Henry Hough Roux (Transvaal Scottish)
Pte Frederick Vasey Adams Ross (Braamfontein)
Lt George Ross (Roodepoort old cemetery)
Pte G Brown (Primrose Cemetery)
Pte A.V. Higham (Primrose Cemetery)
Pte. James Leander Freeman (Brixton)

Imperial Light Horse

Lt. WH Heeley (ILH) (Braamfontein)
2nd Lt. Francis Horwell (Pietermaritzburg Commercial Rd Cem)
Cpl WA Kirsten (ILH) (Braamfontein)
Tpr L.W. Dallamore (ILH) (Brixton)
Tpr Harold Henry King (Cape Town, Wynberg)

Other Military.

Gnr MLC Walsh (THA) (buried in Brixton Cem, grave not found)
Lt. E.L. Bawden (Railways and Harbours Brigade) (Brixton)
Pte Tjaart Johannes Van Der Walt (Railways and Harbours) (Primrose Cem)
Henry Joseph Grinyer (SA Medical Corps) (Brixton)
Gnr Thomas Perridge (THA) (Brixton)
Sidney George Beal (Primrose/Benoni Cemetery)

Caught in the Crossfire.

Eleanor Jane Berry  (Brixton)
Sarah Louisa Diffenthal 10/03/1922 (Brixton)
James Oliver Grey Hall (Brixton)
JE. Redelinghuys (Standerton Cem)

Shot while trying to escape (16/03/1922)

Marthinus Wessels Smith (Brixton)
Petrus Albert Hanekom   (Braamfontein)
Johannes Petrus Hanekom (Braamfontein)
Barend Daniel Hanekom (Bramfontein) 
Lucas Johannes Rautenbach (Brixton)
William Edward Dowse  (Brixton)

Found Guilty and Executed

Taffy Long 17/11/1922 (Brixton)
Herbert Kenneth Hull 17/11/1922 (Brixton)
David Lewis 17/11/1922 (Brixton)
Carel Christian Stassen (burial place not known) 

Suicide

Percy Fisher 14/03/1922 (Brixton)
Harry Spendiff 14/03/1922 (Brixton)

Benoni Rynsoord

L/Sgt Hooper, Frederick William (police)
Const. Hannant, Benjamin (police)
Const. Howe, Frederick Henry Ludwig (police)
Const. Jordan, Addison Ridley (police)
Const. Kruger, Nicholas Andries Cornelius (police)
Dennis Higgins (civilian)
Horace William Adcock (civilian)
Gert G Van Rooyen (civilian)

Rebecca Street Cemetery

Lt Rupert William (Twentyman) Taylor (Military Intelligence)

No further information or unconfirmed

Special Const. E.H.S. Smith (No details)
Carr, Henry Herbert 13/03/1922 (Braamfontein) May not be a casualty
Sergt. A.J. Haviside (no details)
Gnr. M.J. Lourens (no details) 
Corbitt. Patrick (SA Army) (no details)
Const. P. Kanyile (no details)

DRW © 2018. Created 13/02/2018

Updated: 04/06/2018 — 06:21

Durban High School War Memorial

The images of the Durban High School War Memorial are courtesy of Shelly Baker. It may be found at GE co-ordinates -29.844204°, 30.997675°.

The school has existed since 1866 and recently celebrated it’s 150th anniversary. Sadly the Roll of Honour lists so many from the school that perished during the two World Wars as well as the Korean Conflict and the Border War, and one of it’s most famous old boys was Edwin Swales VC.  It is the oldest standing school in Durban and one of the oldest in South Africa.

250 old boys died, and more than 2000 were injured in both World Wars.  The Victoria Cross (VC), 27 Distinguished Flying Crosses (DFC), 21 Military Crosses (MC), 10 Military Medals (MM) and 8 Distinguished Service Orders (DSO) were awarded to old boys in these and subsequent conflicts. In the Battle of Delville Wood in 1916, 12 old boys were killed, 9 wounded and 3 were taken prisoner. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durban_High_School)

The dome was designed by Professor L. Croft, and old boy, and was erected at the Durban High School and Old Boy’s Memorial Trust through the generosity of the late Mrs Lilian Readshaw, a benefactor of the school. Dedicated by the Reverend R. Horrocks, 11 November 1992.

Roll of Honour panels are available on request.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 10/07/2017

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:16

South African Heavy Artillery Memorial: Warrior’s Gate, Durban

75th (Natal) Siege Battery: Warriors Gate Durban

My quest to have a record of all of the South African Heavy Artillery Memorials is one step closer as I can now share images of the SAHA Memorial at Warrior’s Gate in Durban. Special thanks to Carl Hoehler for the  information on where these memorial could be found, as well as additional information on the 6 guns that made up the memorials to the South African Heavy Artillery, and to Shelly Baker for all the effort she took to find and photograph the memorial.

 

This 6-inch 26-cwt howitzers is one of 6 brought back from France and Flanders to be part of the memorials to the South African Heavy Artillery that were established in major centres in South Africa. It is to be found within “Warrior’s Gate” at the corner of Old Fort Road and Masabalala Yengwa Avenue, in Durban (GE Co-ordinates -29.851048°, 31.026746°). Unlike its counterparts in Johannesburg Zoo and Port Elizabeth, there was no dedication plaque to be seen. However, the tompion on the gun does give some indication of why it is there.

 

The weapon ties into the 75th (Natal) Siege Battery and from the images it appears as if it is in a very good condition, and it is heavily fenced off to prevent illicit harvesting of scrap metal. 

The 6 Memorials to the Heavy Artillery can be found in: (Open in new page)

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 08/07/2017. Images courtesy of Shelly Baker. 

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:16

Derelict War Memorial in Springs

Since I first started photographing memorials I have been of the opinion that war memorials on the East Rand are really wasted. The only exception to the rule was the former Brakpan Roll of Honour that was claimed by the Cosy Corner MOTH Shelhole in Brakpan.

The latest in extinct war memorials was found by a correspondent; William Martinson, who kindly sent me images of what is left of what may have been a memorial erected by a MOTH shellhole in Springs.

The clue here is an inscription that is left on the structure.

Naturally I wanted to know more, so have mailed off my contact in the area to see whether he can shed any light on it. There is a Honey tank in Springs and she does not seem to have a a context in the place where she is now (being stripped while nobody is looking), and I could not help wondering if she was not the gate guard from there. I did a blogpost on her recently, and this may be part of the puzzle.

The next question is: just where is this structure. It took me some time but eventually I found it on Google earth.  The co-ordinates are roughly -26.246636°, 28.429237°.

I was very curious about the area that the derelict is in, from GE you can see a large parklike area with lots of trees shaped like a cross. You can see the trees in the image below, the white arrow points to the derelict.

The cemetery can just be seen in the top centre of the image. Historical images on GE date back to 2008 and it appears as if it was a wreck even then. My own thoughts were: “Why build a war memorial there anyway?” From a 2017 perspective it makes no sense, but immediately after the 1st world war it was a totally different story, the memorial being erected in the 1930’s. The other derelict war memorial in Springs pretty much sums it up.  A change in demographics, less money for maintenance and more for mercs, a culture of neglect for history and the never ending quest to cut costs so that the suits will have more to spend on salary increases in spite of them never earning one in the first place. 

Many years ago the MOTH was a thriving organisation, with shellholes in most cities, but the decline in their membership, and a policy of declining former national servicemen membership really put the nail in the coffin. Witness the closure of the former headquarters in Johannesburg and the abandonment of the war memorial in “Remembrance Square”

Whatever the reason for the state of this structure, had the inscription not remained it would really have been worth ignoring, but the words “Mutual Help, Comradeship and Sound Memory” really are a farce in this case.

My thanks must go to William Martinson for his images. He also sent me a link to the Artefacts site that has an entry on the  memorial.  The link also provides an answer to the cross shaped trees in Olympia Park. It is a pity that no images have surfaced that could show how this structure looked when it was originally inaugurated, perhaps the answer is in the local library in Springs? assuming one exists in the first place. 

I am hoping that somebody will be able to add to the history of the structure. If you do have any information I would love to hear from you. 

Update 07/07/2017

My contact had the following to say: “I managed to track down that this structure was a cenotaph and garden of remembrance for the Springs Dugout of the MOTHs during the early 30s. There are no longer any Shellholes in Springs. The last one to close was Mudhook which was situated diagonally across the road of the new Springs Civic Centre. The Shellholes in Spings were Mudhook, Black Cat and Seven Seas. We have the Bell from Seven Seas Shellhole at Cosy Corner,  There are supposedly two field guns standing close to the public swimming pool that used to stand next to the wall of Remembrance,I will make a plan and go and check it out. The park as far as I know is called Olympia Park.”

The monument also featured in an article about illegal dumping in the Springs Advertiser of 6 August 2015.

So there we have it in a nutshell. The MOTH shellholes closed down and the memorial was left behind. The field guns? who knows. I have not forgotten this memorial though and will keep an eye open. Somewhere out there must be an image of some information. 

© DRW 2017-2018, created 02/07/2017, updated 07/07/2017, 18/07/2017

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:17

Harry Norton Schofield VC

Harry Norton Schofield (29/01/1865 – 10/10/1931) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions while serving as a captain in the Royal Artillery (Royal Field Artillery), during the Second Boer War  on 15 December 1899, at the Battle of Colenso.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 27350, Page: 5737, reads: 

“Royal Field Artillery, Captain H. N. Schofield.

At Colenso, on the 15th December, 1899, when the detachments serving the guns of the 14th and 66th Batteries, Royal Field Artillery, had all been killed, wounded, or driven from them by Infantry fire at close range, Captain Schofield went out when the first attempt was made to extricate the guns, and assisted in withdrawing the two that were saved.”

He was awarded the VC along with Lieutenant Frederick Roberts, Cpl George Nurse and Captain Walter Congreve for their attempt at “saving the guns”.

He served in the First World War and retired with the rank of lieutenant colonel and is buried in Putney Vale Cemetery in London.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 14/06/2017. Taddy cigarette card by Card Promotions © 1997, first issued 1902. 

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:17

George Nurse VC

George Nurse (04/04/1873 – 25/11/1945) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions while serving as a corporal in the 66th Battery, Royal Field Artillery, during the Anglo Boer War at the Battle of Colenso.

The Citation that was recorded in the London Gazette of Issue:27160, Page: 689, is about the actions of Captain William Congreve and Lieutenant Frederick Roberts. George Nurse is seemingly mention as an afterthought. The Citation reads:

“The Queen has been graciously pleased to signify Her intention to confer the decoration of the Victoria Cross on the undermentioned Officers and Non-Commissioned Officer, whose claims have been submitted for Her Majesty’s approval, for their conspicuous bravery at the battle of Colenso, as stated against their names:—

The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own), Captain W. N. Congreve.

The King’s Royal Rifle Corps, Lieutenant the Honourable F. H. S. Roberts (since deceased).

66th Battery, Royal Field Artillery, Corporal G. E. Nurse. 

At Colenso on the 15th December, 1899, the detachments serving the guns of the 14th and 66th Batteries, Royal Field Artillery, had all been either killed, wounded, or driven from their guns by Infantry fire at close range, and the guns were deserted.

About 500 yards behind the guns was a donga in which some of the few horses and drivers left alive were sheltered. The intervening space was swept with shell and rifle fire.

Captain Congreve, Rifle Brigade, who was in the donga, assisted to hook a team into a limber, went out; and assisted to limber up a gun. Being wounded, he took shelter; but, seeing Lieutenant Roberts fall, badly wounded, he went out again and brought him in. Captain Congreve was shot through the leg, through the toe of his boot, grazed on the elbow and the shoulder, and his horse shot in three places.

Lieutenant Roberts assisted Captain Congreve. He was wounded in three places.

Corporal Nurse also assisted.”

George Nurse achieved the rank of Lieutenant with the Royal Artillery during World War I and died in Liverpool on 25 November 1945.  He is buried in Allerton Cemetery, Liverpool in the Church of England section.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 13/06/2017. Taddy cigarette card by Card Promotions © 1997, first issued 1902. 

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:18

Edgar Thomas Inkson VC, DSO

Edgar Thomas Inkson (05/04/1872 – 19/02/1947) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Boer War while serving as a lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps, attached to The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers on 24 February 1900, at Hart’s Hill, Colenso.

The Citation, recorded in the Edinburgh Gazette of Issue: 11268, Page: 85,  reads:

“Royal Army Medical Corps, Lieutenant E. T. Inkson.
On the 24ih February 1900, Lieutenant Inkson carried Second Lieutenant Devenish (who was severely wounded  and unable to walk) for three or four hundred yards under n very heavy fire to a place of safety. The ground over which Lieutenant Inkson had to move was much exposed, there being no cover available.”

He is buried in Plot 72, Grave 211757 in Brookwood Cemetery in Surrey. 

A plaque, commemorating his bravery may be found at the National Memorial Arboretum.

Lt. Edgar Thomas Inkson. VC.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 12/06/2017. Taddy cigarette card by Card Promotions © 1997, first issued 1902.

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:18
Blogging while allatsea © 1999-2018. All photographs are copyright to DR Walker or the relevant photographer. Frontier Theme