Waterline Ships Master List

Master list of ships in my collection.  Unfortunately it fell behind because it is difficult to add to it, but I am updating it as at 22/06/2019

Ship Maker Ship Maker
Cunard Line      
Queen Elizabeth Triang Minic HMS Turmoil x 2 Triang Minic
Queen Mary Triang Minic HMS Vanguard Triang Minic
Carinthia Triang Minic KD Bismarck Triang Minic
Ivernia Triang Minic KD Scharnhorst Triang Minic
Aquitania Triang Minic HMS Gloucester (D96) Triang Minic
Caronia Triang Minic USS Bunker Hill Triang Minic
1st Mauretania Albatros USS Spruance Triang Minic
Lusitania Atlas Editions USS Guardian Triang Minic
2nd Mauretania Resin Steam tugs 8 Triang Minic
QE2 Revell HMS Vigilant (M787) Triang Minic
    HMS Bulwark Triang Minic
United States Triang Minic HMS Ark Royal (R07) Triang Minic
NS Savannah Triang Minic IJN Yamato Triang Minic
Varicella Triang Minic USS Missouri Triang Minic
Britannia Triang Minic HMS Swiftsure Triang Minic
Canberra Triang Minic HMS Repton Triang Minic
Vikingen Triang Minic HMS Sutherland Triang Minic
Isle of Sark Triang Minic Pilot boat Triang Minic
City of Durban Triang Minic Ferry Triang Minic
China bulker Triang Minic HMS Bangor (M1099) Triang Minic
C2 Cargo x 4 Triang Minic HMS Brockleberry Triang Minic
Aragon Triang Minic HMS Whitby (M791) Triang Minic
Nieuw Amsterdam Triang Minic HMS Daring (M77) Triang Minic
Flandre Triang Minic HMS Daring (D32) Triang Minic
The Victoria Mercury HMS York (D98) Triang Minic
 Oriana Mercator HMS Chatham (F87) Triang Minic
 France Triang Minic HMS Whitby (M798) Triang Minic
Union-Castle Line   HMS Alamein (M799) Triang Minic
CT Castle rebuild Hein Muck Resin  HMS Dainty (M773) Triang Minic
Carnarvon Castle Albatros  Diesel tugs 2 Triang Minic
Capetown Castle Hein Muck Resin Floating crane Triang Minic
Athlone Castle Len Jordan Resin Floating crane CM
Stirling Castle  Len Jordan Resin HM Castle Class trawler MB Models
Pendennis Castle CM HMCS Snowberry Navis Neptune
Pretoria Castle Albatros HMS Begonia x 2 Navis Neptune
Dunottar Castle Hein Muck Resin HMS Bangor Neptune
Llandaff Castle Len Jordan Resin HMS Tulip  Ensign
Reina Del Mar Len Jordan Resin HMS Achilles (F12) Mountford
Rochester Castle Resin HM Submarine K26 MB Models
Durban Castle Hein Muck Resin HM Submarine K5 MB Models
Windsor Castle  Albatros HM Submarine X-1 MB Models
Transvaal Castle CM HM Submarine M-2 MB Models
Dunnottar Castle Albatros Submarine tender Saar Mercator
Bloemfontein Castle CM 5 x unbranded corvettes Oceanic
Rhodesia Castle CM HMS Tiger Mountford
SY Iolaire Albatros River Class Frigate Neptun
Balmoral Castle Rhenania HMS Renown Atlas Editions
Capetown Castle CM HMS Nelson Atlas Editions
Gloucester Castle  Navis HMS Warspite Atlas Editions
Walmer Castle Solent USS Essex Atlas Editions
    HMS Hood Atlas Editions
Victoria Len Jordan Resin HMS Prince of Wales  Atlas Editions
Arcadia Len Jordan Resin SS TItanic  Atlas Editions
Reina Del Pacifico Hein Muck Resin City of Durban Len Jordan
Andes Hein Muck Resin  SA John Ross  3D print
Marco Polo Resin  SA Wolraad Woltemade  3D print
Ocean Terminal  Triang Minic SS Ohio Len Jordan 
Floating dock  Triang Minic Liberty ship Len Jordan 
 Empire Day  Len Jordan Resin Rapana Len Jordan 
 Leda   CM City of Durham Len Jordan 
Astor Albatros  RMS St Helena x 2  Oceanic
Australis Resin  RMS St Helena (1)  3D print
Achille Lauro CMKR Olympic CM
    Shieldhall Rhenania
German 4 Funnelers      
Deutschland  CM    
Kaiser Wilhelm Der Grosse  Mercator    
Kaiser Wilhelm II  Mercator    
       
       
       

DRW © 2018-2019. Created 04/02/2018, updated 14/02/2019

John Travers “Jack” Cornwell VC

John Travers “Jack” Cornwell 08/01/1900 – 02/06/1916 was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on board HMS Chester during the Battle of Jutland on 31 May 1916.

The Citation reads:
“The KING has been graciously pleased to approve the grant of the Victoria Cross to Boy, First Class, John Travers Cornwell, O.N.J.42563 (died 2 June 1916), for the conspicuous act of bravery specified below. Mortally wounded early in the action, Boy, First Class, Jack Travers Cornwell remained standing alone at a most exposed post, quietly awaiting orders, until the end of the action, with the gun’s crew dead and wounded all round him. His age was under sixteen and a half years.”

On 31 May 1916, Chester was scouting ahead of the 3rd Battlecruiser Squadron at the Battle of Jutland when the ship turned to investigate gunfire in the distance. At 17:30 hours, the Chester soon came under intense fire from four Kaiserliche Marine cruisers each her own size which had suddenly emerged from the haze and increasing funnel smoke of the battlefield. The shielded 5.5-inch gun mounting where Cornwell was serving as a sight-setter was affected by at least four nearby hits. The Chester’s gun mountings were open-backed shields and did not reach down to the deck. Splinters were thus able to pass under them or enter the open back when shells exploded nearby or behind. All the gun’s crew were killed or mortally injured except Cornwell, who, although severely wounded, managed to stand up again and remain at his post for more than 15 minutes, until Chester retired from the action with only one main gun still working. Chester had received a total of 18 hits, but partial hull armour meant that the interior of the ship suffered little serious damage and the ship itself was never in peril. Nevertheless, the situation on deck was dire. Many of the gun crews had lost lower limbs due to splinters passing under the gun shields. British ships report passing the Chester to cheers from limbless wounded gun crew laid out on her deck and smoking cigarettes, only to hear that the same crewmen had died a few hours later from blood loss and shock.

After the action, ship medics arrived on deck to find Cornwell the sole survivor at his gun, shards of steel penetrating his chest, looking at the gun sights and still waiting for orders. Being incapable of further action, Chester was ordered to the port of Immingham. There Cornwell was transferred to Grimsby General Hospital, although he was clearly dying. He died on the morning of 2 June 1916 before his mother could arrive at the hospital. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Cornwell

He is buried in the City of London Cemetery, Manor Park, East London.

The 5,5 Inch gun that Jack Cornwell manned is on display at the Imperial War Museum.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 21/05/2017. Jack Cornwell grave courtesy of Mark Green.

Donald Owen Clarke GC

Donald Owen Clarke (05/03/1923 – 08/09/1942) was posthumously awarded the George Cross for his actions on 08-09/08/1942 off coast of Trinidad while a crewman of the tanker San Emiliano.

“On the night of the 8th-9th August 1942, Clarke was serving on board the tanker “San Emiliano” when it was hit by two torpedoes and her cargo of petroleum burst into flames, turning the ship into an inferno. Clarke was trapped in his cabin but fought his way out on deck and boarded the only lifeboat that was still intact. It was full of burnt and wounded men, and he himself was badly burnt on the face, hands and legs. When the boat was lowered onto the sea, it started to drift back towards the flaming tanker and it was evident that it would require a tremendous effort to pull it out of danger. Most of the occupants, however, were so badly injured that they were unable to help. Despite his injuries, Clarke took an oar and pulled heartily for 2 hours without complaint, and only when the boat was well clear did he collapse and then his hands had to be cut away from the oar as the burnt flesh had stuck to it. He died a few hours later of his injuries.”

Clarke’s body was lost at sea off the coast of Trinidad, and he is commemorated on the Merchant Navy Memorial at Tower Hill in London.

 

© DRW 2016-2018. Information from Victoriacrossonline

William Charles Williams VC

William Charles Williams (15/09/1880 – 25/04/1915) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the landings at Gallipoli in 1915.

The Citation reads:

“On 25 April 1915 during the landing on V Beach, Cape Helles, Gallipoli, Turkey, Williams, with three other men (George Leslie Drewry, Wilfred St. Aubyn Malleson and George McKenzie Samson) was assisting the commander (Edward Unwin) of their ship, HMS River Clyde (previously the SS River Clyde) at the work of securing the lighters. He held on to a rope for over an hour, standing chest deep in the sea, under continuous enemy fire. He was eventually dangerously wounded and later killed by a shell whilst his rescue was being effected by the commander who described him as the bravest sailor he had ever met.”

His body was lost in the carnage of Gallipoli, and he is Commemorated on Portsmouth Naval Memorial panel 8 column 1

 

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 28/02/2017

Gerard Broadmead Roope VC

Gerard Broadmead Roope (13/03/1905 – 08/04/1940) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions while commanding  HMS Glowworm in 1940, in the Norwegian Sea. The recommendation for the award and supporting evidence was provided by the enemy. 

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 37170 Page: 3557 reads:

“The late Lieutenamt-Commandar Gerard Broadmead ROOPE, Royal Navy

On the 8th April, 1940, H.M.S. Glowworm was proceeding alone in heavy weather towards a rendezvous in West Fjord, when she met and engaged two enemy destroyers, scoring at least one hit on them. The enemy broke off the action and headed North, to lead the Glowworm on to his supporting forces. The Commanding Officer, whilst correctly appreciating the intentions of the enemy, at once gave chase. The German heavy cruiser, Admiral “Hipper, was sighted closing the Glowworm at high speed and an enemy report was sent which was received by H.M.S. Renown. Because of the heavy sea, the Glowworm could not shadow the enemy and the Commanding Officer therefore decided to attack with torpedoes and then to close in order to inflict as much damage as possible. Five torpedoes were fired and later the remaining five, but without success. The Glowworm was badly hit; one gun was out of action and her speed was much reduced, but with the other three guns still firing she closed and rammed the Admiral’ Hipper. As the Glowworm drew away, she opened fire again and scored one hit at a range of 400 yards. The Glowworm, badly stove in forward and riddled with enemy fire, heeled over to starboard, and the Commanding Officer gave the order to abandon her. Shortly afterwards she capsized and sank. The Admiral Hipper hove to for at least an hour picking up survivors but the loss of life was heavy, only 31 out of the Glowworm’s complement of 149 being saved.
Full information concerning this action has only recently been received and the VICTORIA CROSS is bestowed in recognition of the great valour of the Commanding Officer who, after fighting off a superior force of destroyers, sought out and reported a powerful enemy unit, and then fought his ship to the end against overwhelming odds, finally ramming the enemy with supreme coolness and skill.”

His body was lost at sea and he is commemorated on Portsmouth Naval Memorial panel 36 column 3.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 28/02/2017

Alfred Edward Sephton VC

Alfred Edward Sephton (19/04/1911 – 19/05/1941), was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Second World War On 18 May 1941 in the Mediterranean, south of Crete, while serving with HMS Coventry when she went to the assistance of a hospital ship which was being attacked by German dive-bombers. 

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 35365 Page: 6889, reads:

“The late Petty Officer Alfred Edward Sephton, P/JX.I3082I, H.M.S. Coventry.
Petty Officer Sephton was Director Layer when H.M.S. Coventry was attacked by aircraft, whose fire grievously wounded him. In mortal pain and faint from loss of blood he stood fast doing his duty without fault until the Enemy was driven off. Thereafter until his death his valiant and cheerful spirit gave heart to the wounded. His high example inspired his shipmates and will live in their memory.”

His body was not brought ashore for burial and presumably was buried at sea. He is Commemorated on Portsmouth Naval Memorial, panel 46 column 2

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 28/02/2016

Frederick Thornton Peters VC, DSO, DSC*

Frederick Thornton Peters (17/09/1889 – 13/11/1942) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during Operation Reservist,  an attempt to capture Oran Harbour, Algeria during the Second World War. 

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 36019 Page: 2215  reads:

“The late Acting Captain Frederick Thornton Peters, D.S.O., D.S.C., Royal Navy,
For valour in taking H.M.S. Walney, in an enterprise of desperate hazard, into the harbour of Oran on the 8th November, 1942. Captain Peters led his force through the boom towards the jetty in the face of point-blank fire from shore batteries, a Destroyer and a Cruiser. Blinded in one eye, he alone of the seventeen Officers and Men on the bridge survived. The Walney reached the jetty disabled and ablaze, and went down with her colours flying”

On 8 November 1942 Captain Peters, commanding in Walney, led his force through the boom towards the jetty in the face of point-blank fire from shore batteries, the sloop La Surprise, and the destroyer Epervier. Blinded in one eye, he alone of 11 officers and men on the bridge survived. Besides him, 13 ratings survived Walney sinking. The destroyer reached the jetty disabled and ablaze and went down with her colours flying. Captain Peters and a handful of men managed to reach the shore, where they were taken prisoner. Hartland came under fire from the French destroyer Typhon and blew up with the loss of half her crew. The survivors, like those of Walney, were taken prisoner as they reached shore.”

The survivors were released on 10 November 1942 when the French garrison surrendered. While coming back to Britain, Captain Peters was killed when the Sunderland he was on crash landed in Plymouth Sound in thick fog on 13 November 1942. His body was not recovered.

He is Commemorated on Portsmouth Naval Memorial, panel 61 column 3

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 28/02/2017

John Wallace Linton VC, DSO, DSC

John Wallace Linton (15/10/1905 – 23/03/1943) was posthumously awarded  the Victoria Cross while commanding HM Submarines.  (The convoy attack specified in the citation occurred off Libya on 28/29 May 1942) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Linton)

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 36028 Page :2329 reads:

“Commander John Wallace Linton, D.S.O., D.S.C., Royal Navy.
From the outbreak of War until H.M.S. Turbulent’s last patrol Commander Linton was constantly in command of submarines, and during that time inflicted great damage on the Enemy. He sank one Cruiser, one Destroyer, one U-boat, twenty-eight Supply Ships, some 100,000 tons in all, and destroyed three trains by gun-fire. In his last year he spent two hundred and fifty-four days at sea, submerged for nearly ‘half the time, and his ship was hunted thirteen times and had two hundred and fifty depth charges, aimed at her.
His many and brilliant successes were due to his constant activity and skill, and the daring which never failed him when there was an Enemy to be attacked. 
On one occasion, for instance, in H.M.S. Turbulent, he sighted a convoy of two Merchantmen
and two Destroyers in mist and moonlight. He worked round ahead of the ‘ convoy and dived to attack it as it passed through the moon’s rays. On bringing his sights to bear he found himself right ahead of a Destroyer. Yet he held his course till the Destroyer was almost on top of him, and, when his sights came on the convoy, he.fired. His great courage and determination were
rewarded. He sank one Merchantman and one Destroyer outright, and set the other ‘Merchantman on fire so that she blew up.”

On 6 May 1941 Lieutenant-Commander John Wallace Linton of HMS Pandora was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross:

“For courage and determination in sinking two Italian supply ships.”

On 15 September 1942 Commander John Wallace Linton, DSC, was appointed a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order:

“For courage and skill in successful submarine patrols in HMS Turbulent.”

 

He was killed in action in Maddalena Harbour, Italy, on 23 March 1943 and is commemorated on Portsmouth Naval Memorial panel 72 column 3

H.M. Submariner Turbulent was lost in March 1943, the circumstance of her loss are not known.   She is commemorated on the memorial at the  Royal Navy Submarine Museum in Gosport.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 27/02/2017

Geoffrey Saxton White VC

Geoffrey Saxton White (02/07/1886 – 28/01/1918) was awarded the Victoria Cross while in command of H.M. Submarine “E 14” on the 28th of January, 1918.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 31354 Page: 6445 reads:

“For most conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as Commanding Officer of H.M. Submarine “E 14” on the 28th of January, 1918.

“E 14” left Mudros on the 27th of January under instructions to force the Narrows and attack the “Goeben”] which was reported aground off Nagara Point after being damaged during her sortie from the Dardanelles. The latter vessel was not found and “E 14” turned back. At about 8.45 a.m. on 28 January a torpedo was fired from “E 14” at an enemy ship; 11 seconds after the torpedo left the tube a heavy explosion took place, caused all lights to go out, and sprang the fore hatch. Leaking badly the boat was blown to 15 feet, and at once a heavy fire came from the forts, but the hull was not hit. “E 14” then dived and proceeded on her way out.

Soon afterwards the boat became out of control, and as the air supply was nearly exhausted, Lieutenant-Commander White decided to run the risk of proceeding on the surface. Heavy fire was immediately opened from both sides, and, after running the gauntlet for half-an-hour, being steered from below, “E 14″ was so badly damaged that Lieutenant-Commander White turned towards the shore in order to give the crew a chance of being saved. He remained on deck the whole time himself until he was killed by a shell.”

His body was not recovered.

He is commemorated on Portsmouth Naval Mermorial Panel 28, Column 3.

Portsmouth Naval Memorial

H.M. Submarine “E14” is remembered at Gosport Submarine Museum.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 27/02/2017

Frederick Daniel Parslow VC

Frederick Daniel Parslow (14/01/1856 – 04/07/1915) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions while in the Atlantic during The first World War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 31354 Page: 6445, reads:

“Lieutenant Frederick Parslow, R.N.R.

For most conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of the Horse Transport “Anglo Californian”

On the 4th July 1915. At 8am on 4th July 1915 a large submarine was sighted on the port beam at the distance of one mile. The ship, which was entirely unarmed, was immediately manoevred to bring the submarine astern; every effort was made to increase speed, and a S.O.S. call was sent out by wireless, an answer being received by a man-of war. At 9a.m. the submarine opened fire making occasional hits until 10.30a.m. meanwhile Lieutenant Parslow constantly altered course and kept the submarine astern.

At 10.30a.m. the enemy hoisted the signal to abandon the vessel as fast as possible and in order to save life Lt. Parslow decided to obey and stopped engines to give as many of the crew as wished the opportunity to get away in the boats. On receiving a wireless message from a destroyer however urging him to hold on for as long as possible he decided to get way on the ship again. The submarine then opened a heavy fire on the bridge and boats with guns and rifles wrecking the upper bridge, killing Lt. Parslow and carrying away one of the port davits causing the boat to drop into the sea and throwing its occupants into the water.

At about 11a.m. two destroyers arrived on the scene and the submarine dived.

Throughout the attack Lt. Parslow remained on the bridge on which the enemy fire was concentrated entirely without protection and by his magnificent heroism succeeded, at the cost of his own life, in saving a valuable ship and cargo

The Royal Navy awarded Captain Parslow a posthumous commission as Lieutenant in the Royal Naval Reserve, and he was then awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

He is buried in Cobh Old Cemetery, Cobh. Ireland. Plot B-15-8, Grave 478, and he is commemorated on Tower Hill Merchant Navy Memorial

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 27/02/2017