Category: ROH

Sedgeberrow War Memorial

Sedgeberrow is a  village  and civil parish in the Wychavon district of Worcestershire, England, about 4.8 km south of Evesham. I first  spotted the war memorial from the bus en route to Evesham and in early November 2018 made a trip to photograph it.  

The memorial is next to the church of “St Mary the Virgin” and may be found at 52.045395°,  -1.965749° and it really comprises 2 entities:  A Crucifix, described as “Crucifix in stone under a canopy set on three steps. The inscription is on the risers of the steps.”

On the exterior wall of the church is affixed another plaque, and it is dedicated to those who served in The First World War. If I read it correctly there are 3 sets of brothers on the two memorials, although that would require additional research. 

Unfortunately I was not able to access the church to see whether there were any memorials within it, and there are no formal CWGC graves in the churchyard.

DRW © 2018. Created 06/11/2018

Updated: 02/03/2019 — 05:04

Overbury War Memorial

I visited the village of Overbury in Worcestershire on 20 October 2018 to photograph the war graves and war memorial in St Faith’s Churchyard. The war memorial is incorporated in the lych gate which makes it hard to photograph the inscriptions on the sides.  There are 5 CWGC graves in the churchyard.

The Memorial commemorates the Men of Overbury and Conderton who gave their lives in the Great War (and the Second World War).  There are 26 names from the First World War and 4 from the Second World War. (https://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorial/32563)

The names on the memorial are shown below.

The Second World War plaque is much smaller.

The lych gate and war memorial in St Faith’s churchyard may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates  52.034918°,  -2.064199°

DRW © 2018. Created 29/10/2018

Updated: 02/03/2019 — 05:05

Kemerton War Memorial

Kemerton is a small village in a string of villages between Tewkesbury and Evesham. I visited the village to photograph the memorial on 20/10/2018.

The War Memorial is described as a “Latin Limestone Cross atop a tall shaft, which is on a 5 stage base. The design of the cross was adapted from an ancient village cross in the village of Laycock.” (https://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorial/32460). It was unveiled on 9 January 1921, and was made by Sir Herbert Baker RA (possibly the architect?), Messrs E T Taylor of Tewkesbury and Mr A Stanley of Kemerton. It is a Grade II listed structure. 

There are 20 names from the First World War and 7 from the Second World War on the memorial.

The memorial may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates: 52.033202°,  -2.079959°.

DRW 2018. Created 24/10/2018

Updated: 02/03/2019 — 05:05

Commando Winners of the Victoria Cross

The Commando Winners of the Victoria Cross Plaque may be found at the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire.

Lt Col Geoffrey Keyes VC, MC.
Lt Col Charles Newman VC
Sgt Thomas Durrant VC
Maj Patrick Porteus VC
L/Cpl Henry Harden VC
Lt George A Knowland VC
Cpl Thomas Hunter VC
Maj Anders Lassen VC, MC**

DRW © 2018. Created 21/08/2018

Updated: 26/08/2018 — 19:26

Gloucester Post Office War Memorial

On Friday 12/01/2018 I went through to Gloucester to do some business at the post office, and as I was leaving I spotted a war memorial inside the post office. Fortunately I had my camera with and got permission to photograph it. The two plaques are mounted quite high up on the wall and the corner is cramped so these pics are the best I can do.

First World War.

The inscription reads: 

Pro patria. This tablet is erected by the Postmaster and staff of Gloucester and district in memory of the undermentioned colleagues who fell in the Great War 1914-1919.

The names on the Memorial (World War 1) are: 

  • Johnson. T. (!)
  • Constance. A.E. (?)
  • Jones. E.G. (!)
  • Evans. A.H. (!)
  • Phillips. G.(!)
 

An (*) indicates that may be the CWGC details for that person. (?) indicates that no casualty with that name was found. (!) Too many possibles and not enough information. Wm = William,  Name list obtained from http://www.royalmailmemorials.com/memorial/gloucester-and-district-war-memorial

Second World War.

The inscription reads:

Pro patria. This tablet is erected by the Head Postmaster and staff of Gloucester and district in the memory of the undermentioned colleagues who fell in the World War 1939-1945

  • Harman. V.A.(!)
  • Cook. R.J.(!)
  • James. I.T.(!)
 

Underneath the above plaque is a notice stating that The war memorial was maintained by Royal Mail and may not be removed without permission.  That is the first time I have seen such a notification on any war memorial, so hopefully it will not end up the way so many others have.

Gloucester Post Office

Interestingly enough, Geoffrey Howard Duberley is buried in West Park Cemetery in Johannesburg and I photographed his grave in 2007.

There is a similar memorial at the Royal Mail Depot in Tewkesbury.

Birt W.F (*)

Garratt C.E (?)

Peach R.F. (?)

Rowley H.G

DRW © 2018. Created 15/01/2018

Updated: 17/01/2018 — 07:05

Ashchurch War Memorial (Tewkesbury)

When I moved to Tewkesbury in 2015 it was inevitable that my camera lens would be on the lookout for churches, cemeteries and war memorials. The Parish Church of St Nicholas  in the village of Ashchurch being the one church closest to where I was living at the time.  I made two visits to the church and once I had done those I put it out of my mind and concentrated on other things. However, I was unaware that there was a war memorial associated with Ashchurch and this past week I realised that I had missed out. 

St Nicholas Parish Church

The War Memorial may be found on Google Earth at  51.997611°,  -2.105686°.  and it is not too difficult to find it, you literally follow the cycle path until you find St Nicholas church, then cross the road and there you are. 

The war memorial may be described as a “Cross with ‘roof’ ends on top and each arm, set on capital on top of square tapered column on three step base”.  (http://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorial/20772)

Remembrance Day was almost 2 months ago  and there are still wreaths at the memorial. The main inscription reads:

There are three panels with names from both World Wars, 24 from the First World War and two from the 2nd. It will be interesting to see how many of them are buried in the graveyard of St Nicholas Church just over the road. I do know that there is a memorial to Major Bertram Cartland in the grounds of Tewkesbury Abbey. 

Alternatively the names on the memorial may be seen at http://www.glosgen.co.uk/warmem/ashchurchwm.htm.   I created a community at Lives of the First World War specifically for this memorial. 

Ashchurch Village Hall

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 26/12/2017

Updated: 15/01/2018 — 08:03

202 Battalion Memorial

34 Battalion was commonly known as the “Kavangoland Battalion” and it was established in 1975 as 1 Kavango Battalion to serve as a ceremonial guard of honour.  It was then renamed 34 Battalion and again renamed 202 Battalion in 1980.

As part of Sector 20, their main area of responsibility was from Rundu West as far as Sector 10 and East up to the Bagani Bridge and they were credited with completely suppressing all insurgency activities in the Kavango area of the South West Africa region by 1987. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/34_Battalion. The unit was disbanded in 1990/1991

In 1987, Cmdt JR Liebenberg tasked the RSM, WO1 FJS Scheepers to erect a Memorial to the Fallen of 202 battalion and to create a museum at the base in Rundu in what was then South West Africa. It was inaugurated by Major General WC Meyer and OC Sector 20 Col. PM Muller on 8 November 1987

 

 

When South West Africa gained it’s independence the memorial, like many memorials in the operational area was moved to safety, but unfortunately it went “missing” and was eventually traced to the Army College in Pretoria but it had been destroyed at some point.

The Roll of Honour falling victim at the same time.

It is hoped that one day a new memorial will be erected to remember those members of 202 Battalion who paid the ultimate price. 

Roll Of Honour.

The  Roll of Honour is a work in process as more information is forthcoming. It is based off the ROH at the 202 Bn Wikipedia page but is by no means complete)

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 16/04/2017. Images courtesy of Charl Parkin, used with permission. 

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:48

Worcestershire Anglo Boer War Memorial

The Memorial to the Men of Worcestershire who lost their lives in the Boer War stands outside Worcester Cathedral.

The Memorial  is a bronze depiction of a  soldier of the Worcester Regiment kneeling as he prepares to fire his last cartridge. A winged figure said to represent “Immortality” stands above him with a palm branch in one hand, and in the other hand a sheathed sword with laurel wreath on it. It was unveiled on 23 September 1908 by Lt. Gen. the Hon. Sir N. G. Lyttleton. The monument was restored in 2005. The sculptor was William Robert Colton and it is a grade II listed object.

There is an additional inscription on the base of the memorial that is not as legible.

Their bodies were buried in peace

but their name liveth forevermore 

Inside the Cathedral there is an additional Roll of Honour.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 07/03/2017. 

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:39

Stoke Newington Civilian War Dead Memorial

The Metropolitan Borough of Stoke Newington Civilian War Dead Memorial may be found in Abney Park Cemetery in London (Google Earth co-ordinates: 51.564451°, -0.077899°).
The legibility of the memorial is poor though, with letters missing from the main inscription.

The inscription reads:

METROPOLITAN BOROUGH OF STOKE NEWINGTON

TO THE MEMORY OF THOSE WHO LOST THEIR LIVES THROUGH ENEMY ACTION IN THE BOROUGH

DURING WORLD WAR 1939-1945 AND IN PARTICULAR OF THOSE WHOSE NAMES ARE INSCRIBED ON THIS MEMORIAL

DEATH IS BUT CROSSING THE WORLD AS FRIENDS DO THE SEA – THEY LIVE IN ONE ANOTHER STILL.

Source: (https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1419855)

There are 113 names inscribed on the memorial, of whom 88 were as a result of a German bomb that made a direct hit on a crowded shelter at Coronation Avenue, just off the High Street on 13th October 1940,  Most people in the Shelter were killed and are listed on the memorial, the list shows that many of the people were Jewish Refugees, There were also 2 persons Unidentified. The memorial also includes the names of 7 of the locations in the borough at which civilians lost their lives during the Second World War. The memorial is listed as Grade II. 

The complete list of names is available on The Roll of Honour Website

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 6/01/2016

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 13:23

The Gloucesters Memorial in Cheltenham

One of the more poignant memorials to the casualties of the First World War may be found within Prestbury Cemetery in Cheltenham.  Passing through the gates of the cemetery, on the right hand side is the Gloucesters Memorial and Crosses.

Prestbury Cemetery. Glosters Memorial highlighted in red

Prestbury Cemetery. Gloucesters Memorial highlighted in red

At first glance the memorial really looks like a rack for storing garden tools, but as you get closer only then do you realise what it is you are seeing.

Beneath the four simple wooden shelters are the original grave markers that stood on the graves of fallen soldiers. Unfortunately, over the years they have lost their legibility and today some of which I cannot identify. There are 21 markers in total and they represent the graves of 21 men. I have since added in a link to the relevant CWGC page for each identified cross. 

Extreme left hand shelter

Extreme left hand shelter

From left to right: L/cpl Leslie James Silvester (1st 5th Gloucesters, 20/05/1915), Pte HR. Arundell (1st 4th Gloucesters 15/04/1917), Pte Ernest G. Smith (2nd 5th Gloucesters, 17/04/1917), Pte William. Regan (1st 3rd Monmouthshire Regt. 22/05/1915), No visible identification.

Left inward shelter

Left inward shelter

From left to right: Lt Francis Charles Erlin Clarke (Worcs Regt and RFC. 11/10/1917), No visible identification, Pte Charles William Harwood (1st Bn Devonshire Regt. 04/10/1917), Not Legible, Maj Lionel Goodeve (1st Bn Royal Scots Fusiliers. 26/08/1916), Damaged, crosspiece has legible identification.

Centrepiece

Centrepiece

In the centre is another cross which is marked with more names of soldiers that fell in August 1916.

Inner right hand shelter

Inner right hand shelter

From left to right: 2Lt. Kenneth Gerard Gurney (spelt Gournly on the marker) 5th Bn Gloucester Regt, 17/10/1917), Pte Sidney Leonad Dean (1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt 27/08/1918), No visible identification, No visible identification, Pte Harold Edgar. Ralph (171st Labour Coy, 15/04/1918).

Right hand side outside

Right hand side outside

From left to right: Capt. John Harold Elleston. Rickerby MC. (2/5 Gloucester Regt, 22/03/1918), Maj. John Gwynne Griffith (32nd Lancers, 24/05/1915), Lt. Reginald Anthony. Lyon (Army Cyclist Corps, 13/08/1917), Pte. Arthur Thomas Hiron (Nth Staffs Regt. 15/10/1918), Not Legible.

This is a unique memorial, although the brown paintwork does make it look impersonal, and of course over the years the identification of some of the markers has been lost. It is a pity that the markers were not given a coat of a clear varnish so that the original colouring of the them could be seen. Not too many of these early wooden markers have survived, and this is the biggest collection that I have ever seen. It is a very humbling experience.

(11/2017 image)

(11/2017 image)

(11/2017 image)

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 09/08/2015. Changed spelling throughout page to Gloucesters 03/11/2017, corrected link that points to blogger, added CWGC links and added new images.

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:25
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