Category: Military

Asian and African Warships to the Cape

 
This gallery comprises images from Asia (Japan, Taiwan, India, Pakistan, Malaysia), Kenya and South African Navy vessels
 
 
DRW © 2020. Created 03/01/2020
Updated: 05/01/2020 — 15:09

American, Russian and Soviet Warships to the Cape

 
This gallery comprises images from the United States, Russia and the former USSR.
 
 
DRW © 2019 – 2020. Created 29/12/2019
Updated: 01/01/2020 — 09:11

European Warships to the Cape

 
This gallery comprises images from Belgium, Denmark, France, Holland, Italy, Spain,  Sweden and the United Kingdom
 
 
DRW © 2019 – 2020. Created 23/12/2019
Updated: 01/01/2020 — 09:11

South American Warships to the Cape.

I was given a whole stack of prints that were photographed of warships that called in Cape Town and Simonstown roughly between 1994 and 2002. The photographer was Patrick Gavin Worman, and unfortunately like so many of us he was tied down to weather, photography position, camera and skill, and I am grateful to him for capturing images of these vessels. He passed away in 2018  

This gallery features ships from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. 

DRW © 2019 -2019. Created 23/12/2019. 

Updated: 01/01/2020 — 08:34

Bladon War Memorial

On 24 August 2019 I visited the village of Bladon to view Sir Winston Churchill’s grave and as I was leaving the grounds of St Martin’s Parish Church I spotted the Bladon War Memorial which is close by.

Google Earth co-ordinates are 51.830480°, -1.350584°. The memorial is described as:

“Obelisk set on a square plinth and two steps. Incised Latin cross surrounded by green wreath is placed at the top of the obelisk with two plaques on front face of plinth and a small plaque on front face of first step. The whole stands on a gravel surround and is enclosed by a low wall.”

https://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorial/59955

The inscription reads:

IN MEMORY OF THE FALLEN

1914-1918/ “Faithful unto Death”/(Names)

1939-1945/ (Names)

There are 28 names on the memorial; 23 from the First World War and 5 from the second.

The only War Memorial I found in St Martin’s Parish Church was a simple framed Roll of Honour, however it could be that I did not see a larger or more elaborate memorial.

DRW © 2019. Created 18/09/2019. 

Updated: 19/12/2019 — 06:39

Stratford-upon-Avon War Memorials

The main War Memorial in Stratford-upon-Avon may be found in The Remembrance Gardens bounded by College Street and Old Town (Google Earth co-ordinates:  52.187884°,  -1.708347°).

There are a number of memorials in the gardens and it is a peaceful place.

Memorial Cross.

The Memorial Cross commemorates is of a similar design to that of the Cross of Sacrifice only without the sword on the front face.  It commemorates casualties that lost their lives in the First World War. The bronze plaques to the remaining seven sides of the pedestal list the names of the 235 men who died in the conflict. There is an additional bronze plaque to the second stage of the pedestal which is titled FIRST WORLD WAR 1914-1920 and gives the names of 12 men and the date of their death. It was unveiled on 12 February 1922. Name plaques may be viewed at https://www.warmemorialsonline.org.uk/memorial/85900

The Memorial was originally erected in Bridge Street but was moved to a site overlooking Bancroft Gardens before the Second World War. In 1954 it was relocated to the newly created Garden of Remembrance.

Screen Wall

The Second World War casualties are commemorated on plaques mounted on a screen wall.

This memorial is a concave 3 panelled wall with commemorative plaques attached to it. There are 100 names on the memorial. Plaques may be viewed at https://www.warmemorialsonline.org.uk/memorial/85897

Other Memorials.

King Edward VI School Memorial.

King Edward VI School Boat Club

Dedication Plaque

DRW © 2019. Created 17/09/2019

Updated: 19/12/2019 — 06:39

Oxford War Memorial

The War Memorial in Oxford may be found 130 metres south of St. Giles’ Churchyard, on the intersection of Banbury and Woodstock Roads (Google Earth co-ordinates: 51.758313°, -1.260130°).  It was unveiled and dedicated on 13 July 1921 and may be described as: “Seven-stepped octagonal base surmounted by an elaborate octagonal sectioned plinth, square-footed, octagonal sectioned tapering shaft, moulded octagonal boss and decorative cross.” (https://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorial/31813)

There no names mentioned on the memorial. 

Inscription

The two trees on the site are plaqued as follows:

DRW © 2019. Created 01/07/2019

Updated: 19/07/2019 — 05:21

S.A.S. Somerset

This post has been written many years after the fact and to be honest prior to today I have never really had much to add to a SAS Somerset post. However, I have recently found the handout I received when I visited the ship in 1993.

SAS Somerset

The one thing I do remember is how clean and well maintained she looked when I was on board, and the men in charge were rightly proud of her. Sadly as at 2019 her future is bleak and it is likely that she will end up being broken up. 

From the original handout that I received on the ship

Potted history of the SAS Somerset.

The ship was built by Blyth Shipbuilding Company and is listed as yard number 280, her machinery was built by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richards Ltd, Tyneside. Her keel was laid on 15 April 1941 and she entered service with the Royal Navy on 08 April 1942 as HMS Barcross.

HMS Barcross (1943) South African Military Museum. This photo was published in 1944 – 66 years ago – In South Africa, copyright prescribes after 50 years! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAS_Somerset

HMS Barcross and her sister ship HMS Barbrake arrived at Simonstown, in 1942 and was transferred to Saldanha Bay for boom defence operations directly thereafter. In 1943 she was re-designated as HMSAS Barcross and transferred to the South African Naval Forces for the remainder of the war. In 1946 she was was purchased by the South African Government and was used for the dumping of ammunition off Cape Town and Port Elizabeth. On completion of these services, she was transferred to Salisbury Island in Durban and was subsequently laid up at Salisbury Island. In 1951 her name was changed to SAS Somerset.

During 1955 Somerset was brought back into service and during this period she was tasked in salvaging the remains of two Harvard training aircraft following a mid air collision over Table Bay. Six weeks later she recovered a third Harvard which had crashed into the sea off Bok Point. In 1959 during a refit, Somerset had her coal fired boilers converted to oil. 

In 1961 Somerset salvaged the South African Railways tug F. Schermbrucker which had sunk in East London harbour. In 1967 she was fitted out with new boilers and a reconditioned main engine. In 1968 her services were called on again to assist the cable ship John W. Mackay to raise and repair the newly inaugurated overseas telephone cable in the shallow waters off Melkbosstrand. During 1969 Somerset raised the old whale catcher Wagter 11 in Saldanha Bay and subsequently towed her back to Simonstown. During the same year, she salvaged a floating crane which had capsized and sunk at Port Elizabeth. In the early hours of 24 July 1974 Somerset was dispatched to Cape Agulhas to assist with the salvage of the Oriental Pioneer, poor weather conditions and bad luck rendered this effort unsuccessful.

In 1981 the fishing trawler Aldebaran was successfully raised in Port Elizabeth having laid on the bottom for over two and a half years. Somerset also acted as a standby vessel during submarine shallow water diving operations. In 1983 she assisted in the salvaging of a barge and two whale catchers at Saldanha Bay. In March 1986, Somerset was finally paid off. In 1988 she was donated as a museum ship, moored at the waterfront at Cape Town.  She is the only boom defence vessel remaining in the world.  (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAS_Somerset)

SAS Somerset on the synchro-lift 04/06/1988

SAS Somerset on the synchro-lift 04/06/1988

The following images were taken by Dylan Knott on 17 February and April 2019. Sadly it appears as if the Somerset is to be broken up. Images are used with permission and are copyright to the photographer.

DRW © 2019 -2020. Created 01/03/2019. Images of Somerset on the synchro by Patrick Gavin Worman, images of Somerset in 2019 courtesy of Dylan Knott © 2019

Updated: 01/01/2020 — 09:08

Roll of Honour. St John’s College, Houghton

St John’s College in Houghton has a very strong connection to the military, and there are two chapels on the premises. The larger chapel houses the Roll of Honour, whereas the Crypt Chapel has the Delville Wood Cross in it. I have dealt with that chapel in a previous post and this post really deals with the Roll of Honour. Unfortunately my images are less than satisfactory, but I was pushed for time and was not able to concentrate on what I was photographing, which is probably why it has taken so long for these images to appear in the first place.

I really started working on the Roll of Honour as a result of my involvement with “Lives of the First World War”, and really looked at the 1914-1918 portion of the Roll of Honour and created a community for it (Community will be unavailable until July 2020). I had hoped to be able to tie a name into a specific record but I was not always successful. The problem really is that some names tie into a number of possibles, or don’t tie into anybody and without more details I am just unable to do anything except guess, and even then I cannot. The results here may not be correct and I do welcome any help with them.  

The inscriptions are on wooden panels and it was not easy to read them which is why I took an image with the flash and an image without one.  Images link to either CWGC or South African War Graves Project. There are 4 sections to this page: World War 1, World War 2, Post World War, Private Memorials

World War 1

V.L. Adams

CA Bailey (1)
R O Bettington
S. Dunstan (2)
A.Eastwood (3)
A Fraser (4)
W. Hirst (5)
R. Johnstone (6)
C.D. King (7)
H. Mallett DCM
S Marsh (8)
R. Martin (9)
J Peters (10)
B. Stokes (11)
W. Ware-Austin (12)

(1) CA Bailey. No possible candidate found

(2). S Dunstan. There are two possibles at CWGC but no way to tie either of them to the ROH.

(3) A Eastwood. No possible candidate found

(4) A Fraser. Possible candidate

(5) W Hirst. No possible candidate found

(6) R Johnstone. Two possibles but no way to positively tie them to the ROH

(7) CD King. Many possibles but nothing to tie them into the ROH

(8) S Marsh. Two possibles but no way to positively tie them to the ROH

(9) R Martin. Many possibles but no way to positively tie them to the ROH

(10) J Peters. Many possibles but no way to positively tie them to the ROH

(11) B Stokes. No possible candidate found

(12) W. Ware-Austin. No possible candidate found. 

World War 2

L. Adams (2)
P.H. Andrews (3)
H.C. Campbell (4)
G. Cherrington (5)
B.D. Havnl (1)
J.A. Hill (7)
R. MacDonald (8)
D.F. Murray (9)
B.P. Purves (10)
F.M. Reim (11.)

(1) Surname appears to be Havnl but this may be missing characters. 

(2) May be http://www.southafricawargraves.org/search/details.php?id=160

(3) May be http://www.southafricawargraves.org/search/details.php?id=537

(4) Two possibles but not able to confirm which it is

(5) No data on a G Cherrington

(6) Aka known as Baratt, Thomas Oxenham Gordon

(7) Two possibles but no way of checking which it is

(8) May be http://www.southafricawargraves.org/search/details.php?id=14221

(9) Two possibles but not enough information

(10) May be https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2239953/purves,-brian-percival/

(11) Initials are given as M.F on grave

Post World War 2

M.D. Reitz  (1952)

C.H.C.R. Stewart (12)

R.H. Mentis (1963)

P.N. Gettliffe (12)

D.A. Carshalton (1976)

D.R. Mitchell (12)

A Gordon-Bennett (1978)

A. De Kiewiet (12)

(12) No record found

Private Memorials.

I saw two private memorials amongst the panels.

 

Cyprian Ryland Jenkin
Tom Michael Glanvill Jenkin

DRW © 2018-2020. Created 15/11/2018, World War 2 names added 16/04/2019, added in links 18/04/2019, URL changed 29/12/2019

Updated: 29/12/2019 — 15:24

Sedgeberrow War Memorial

Sedgeberrow is a  village  and civil parish in the Wychavon district of Worcestershire, England, about 4.8 km south of Evesham. I first  spotted the war memorial from the bus en route to Evesham and in early November 2018 made a trip to photograph it.  

The memorial is next to the church of “St Mary the Virgin” and may be found at 52.045395°,  -1.965749° and it really comprises 2 entities:  A Crucifix, described as “Crucifix in stone under a canopy set on three steps. The inscription is on the risers of the steps.”

On the exterior wall of the church is affixed another plaque, and it is dedicated to those who served in The First World War. If I read it correctly there are 3 sets of brothers on the two memorials, although that would require additional research. 

Unfortunately I was not able to access the church to see whether there were any memorials within it, and there are no formal CWGC graves in the churchyard.

DRW © 2018. Created 06/11/2018

Updated: 02/03/2019 — 05:04
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