Category: Crimean War

William Hope VC

William Hope (12/04/1834 – 17/12/1909) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War  on 18 June 1855 at Sebastopol,

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21997,  Page: 1578, reads:

“7th Regiment, Lieutenant William Hope, Date of Act of Bravery, 18th June, 1855.

After the troops had retreated on the morning of the 18th June, 1855, Lieutenant W. Hope being informed by the late Serjeant-Major William Bacon, who was himself wounded, that Lieutenant and Adjutant Hobson was lying outside the trenches badly wounded, went out to look for him, and found him lying in the old agricultural ditch running towards the left flank of the Redan. He then returned, and got four men to bring him in. Finding, however, that Lieutenant Hobson could not be removed without a stretcher, he then ran back across the open to Egerton’s Pit, where he procured one, and carried it to where Lieutenant Hobson was lying.
All this was done under a very heavy fire from the Russian batteries.”

William Hope passed away on 17th December 1909 in London, aged 75. He was buried in the family grave in Brompton Cemetery.

DRW © 2018. Created 13/08/2018. Image courtesy of Mark Green

Updated: 26/08/2018 — 19:26

William Reynolds VC

William Reynolds (1827 – 20/10/1869) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 20 September 1854 at the Battle of the AlmaCrimean Peninsula,

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 657, reads:

“Scots Fusilier Guards, No. 3308 Private Wm. Reynolds.

When the formation of the line was disordered at Alma, for having behaved in a conspicuous manner in rallying the men round the Colours. “

He passed away aged just 42 at his home in The Strand on 20th October 1869 and was buried in a common grave in Brookwood Cemetery.

DRW © 2018. Created 10/08/2018, Image courtesy of Mark Green.

Updated: 26/08/2018 — 19:27

Cheltenham Crimean War Memorial

The Crimean War Memorial in Cheltenham may be found on a small island outside the Queen’s Hotel on the Promenade, Cheltenham,  (Google Earth  51.896628°,  -2.079972°). 

It commemorates men from Cheltenham who lost their lives during the Crimean War and is a grade II listed structure and was restored in 2008.

There is a dedication on either side of the base.

The Memorial originally consisted of a pair of guns taken from Sebastapol and they were erected, each on it’s own base, on 5th July 1858. However during  the Second World War the guns and one base were turned in and melted down for munitions.

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 17/05/2017

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:09

John Joseph Sims VC

John Joseph Sims (1835 – 06/12/1881) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions following the assault on the Redan on 18 June 1855 during the Crimean War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 659, reads:

“On the 18th June 1855, after his Regiment had retreated back to their trenches following the assault on the Redan, he went out into the open ground, under heavy fire, in broad daylight, and brought in wounded soldiers outside the trenches.”   

Sims died on 6 December 1881, aged 46 in the Union Workhouse, Thavies Inn, City of London from tuberculosis, and was buried in common ground in the City of London Cemetery, Manor Park. On Friday, 11th April 2003, a memorial plaque was placed over the location of his grave. 

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 21/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. 

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:46

Sir Frederick Francis Maude VC, GCB

Frederick Francis Maude (20/12/1821 –  20/06/1897) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean Campaign. 

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 658, reads:

“3rd Regiment, Bt. Lieut.-Colonel Frederick Francis Maude.

For conspicuous and most devoted bravery on the 8th September, 1855, when in command of the covering and Ladder Party of the 2nd Division, on the assault of the Redan, to which he gallantly led his men. Having entered the Redan, he, with only nine or ten men, held a position between traverses, and only retired when all hope of support was at an end, himself dangerously wounded.

He is buried in Brompton Cemetery in London.

© DRW 2013-2018. Created 02/02/2017, edited 04/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:31

Andrew Henry VC

Andrew Henry (01/11/1823 – 14/10/1870) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War. 

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971 Page: 655, reads:

“Land Transport Corps (late) Royal Artillery.
Captain Andrew Henry.

He was at the time of the action a sergeant major of ‘G’ Battery Royal Artillery when on a foggy November morning in 1854 Russian troops launched a surprise attack on the British lines and quickly surrounded the Battery. Soon Sgt Andrew Henry was the only British soldier left. With his sword in one arm and using the other to pull a bayonet from his leg he fought valiantly. Sgt Henry received twelve bayonet wounds but lived to receive the Victoria Cross.”

He is buried in Ford Park Cemetery, Plymouth, Devon.

 

 

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 13/01/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 19:55

Robert Humpston VC

Robert Humpston (1832 –  22/12/1884) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War.

The Citation reads:

“On 22 April 1855 in the Crimea Private Humpston and Private Joseph Bradshaw, on their own, attacked and captured a Russian rifle pit situated among the rocks overhanging the Woronzoff Road. The pit was occupied every night by the Russians and its capture and subsequent destruction was of great importance.”

He is buried in General Cemetery in Nottingham.

Robert Humpston VC 1832 - 22/12/1884 General Cemetery Nottingham

Robert Humpston VC
1832 – 22/12/1884
General Cemetery Nottingham

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 31/10/2016. Image by Mark Green

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:52

William Nathan Wrighte Hewett VC, KCB, KCSI

William Nathan Wrighte Hewett  (12/08/1834 – 13/05/1888) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 652 reads:

“Wm. Nathan Wright Hewett, Lieutenant.

1st. On the occasion of a repulse of a sortie of Russians by Sir De Lacy Evans’ Division on the 26th October, 1854, Mr. Hewett, then Acting-Mate of Her Majesty’s Ship “Beagle,” was in charge of the Right Lancaster Battery before Sebastopol. The advance of the Russians placed the gun in great jeopardy, their skirmishers advancing within 300 yards of the Battery, and pouring in a sharp fire from their Minié rifles. By some misapprehension the word was passed to spike the gun and retreat; but Mr. Hewett, taking upon himself the responsibility of disregarding the order replied, that “Such order did not come from Captain Lushington, and he would not do it till it did.” Mr. Hewett then pulled down the parapet of the Battery, and with the assistance of some soldiers, got his gun round, and poured upon the advancing column of Russians a most destructive and effective fire.

For the gallantry exhibited on this occasion, the Board of Admiralty promoted him to the rank of Lieutenant.

2nd. On the 5th November, 1854, at the Battle of Inkerman, Captain Lushington again brought before the Commander-in-chief the services of Mr. Hewett, saying, “I have much pleasure in again bringing Mr. Hewett’s gallant conduct to your notice.”

(Sir S. Lushington to Vice-Admiral Sir J. D. Dundas, inclosed in. despatches of 1st November, 1854, and 8th November, 1854).”

He is buried in Highland Road Cemetery in Portsmouth.

Portsmouth Highland Road Cemetery

© DRW 2013-2018. Created 28/10/2016. Edited 13/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:54

Henry James Raby. VC. CB

Henry James Raby (26/09/1827 –  13/02/1907) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War in 1855.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 653,  reads:

“Henry James Raby,

Commander John Taylor,

Captain of the Forecastle Henry Curtis, Boatswain’s Mate.

On the 18th June, 1855, immediately after the assault on Sebastopol, a soldier of the 57th Regiment, who had been shot through both legs, was observed sitting up, and calling for assistance. Climbing; over the breastwork of the advanced sap, Commander Baby and the two seamen proceeded upwards of seventy yards across the open space towards the salient angle of the Bedan, and in spite of the heavy fire which was still continuing, succeeded in carrying the wounded soldier to a place of safety, at the imminent risk of their own lives. (Letter from Sir S. Lushington, 7th June, 1856.)”

Raby was the first man to receive the VC from The Queen at the first investiture on 26 June 1857. The Queen pinned the crosses on the recipients in strict order of Service precedence and seniority. Commander Raby therefore came first as the senior officer in the senior service on parade, although his V.C. deed had been performed after that of the midshipman, Lucas, who certainly stands as the first to be awarded the Victoria Cross. Similarly in the army contingent, Sergeant-Major Grieve was the first soldier on the parade to receive the cross, because he belonged to the Cavalry, an arm senior to the Infantry, although his VC deed was later than those of the four infantry soldiers who earned it at the Alma.”

He died in Southsea, and is buried in Highland Road Cemetery in Portsmouth.

Portsmouth Highland Road Cemetery

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 27/10/2016, edited 13/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:54

John Robarts VC

John Robarts (1818 – 17/10/1888) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean War while serving as a  gunner in the Royal Navy.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 650, reads:

“John Roberts, Gunner.

This Warrant Officer landed with Lieutenants Buckley and Burgoyne at Genitchi, in presence of a superior force, and set fire to the Stores, a service of imminent risk. (Despatch from Admiral Lord Lyons, 2nd June, 1855, No. 419.).” 

“On 29 May 1855 in the Sea of Azov, Crimea, Gunner Robarts of HMS Ardent with two lieutenants (Cecil William Buckley and Hugh Talbot Burgoyne), one from HMS Miranda and the other from HMS Swallow, volunteered to land on a beach where the Russian army were in strength. They were out of covering gunshot range of the ships offshore and met considerable enemy opposition, but managed to set fire to corn stores and ammunition dumps and destroy enemy equipment before embarking again. 

He is buried in Highland Road Cemetery in Portsmouth.

Portsmouth Highland Road Cemetery

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 22/06/2016. Edited 13/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 07:42
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