Category: cenotaph

Liverpool Cenotaph

The Cenotaph in Liverpool may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates  53.408540°,  -2.979478°, it is situated in front of St George’s Hall and consists of a  rectangular block of stone on a platform, with bronze, low-relief sculptures on the sides depicting marching troops and mourners. It was designed by Lionel Budden, with carving by Herbert Tyson Smith. It is a Grade I listed building.

​The inscription on the front face reads:

TO THE THE MEN OF LIVERPOOL WHO FELL IN THE GREAT WAR

AND ALL WHO HAVE FALLEN IN CONFLICT SINCE.

AND THE VICTORY THAT DAY WAS TURNED INTO MOURNING UNTO ALL THE PEOPLE

 

This addition to the Cenotaph was unveiled in May 2003 by the Lord Mayor, Councillor Jack Spriggs. The inscription reads: 

THIS PLAQUE COMMEMORATES

THE BATTLE OF THE ATLANTIC

AND THE PIVOTAL ROLE PLAYED BY THE CITY

AND PORT OF LIVERPOOL IN THIS THE

LONGEST AND MOST CRUCIAL SEA AND AIR 

CAMPAIGN OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR

THIS BATTLE LASTED 5 YEARS, 8 MONTHS, 4 DAYS;
HAD IT BEEN LOST, SO TOO WOULD HAVE BEEN THE WAR

BY THE MARKER, LIVERPOOL’S  UNPARALLELED SERVICE
AND SACRIFICE SHALL NOT BE FORGOTTEN.

As far as Cenotaphs go it is really not a very noticeable one, although the carvings are very beautiful. It is really overshadowed by the very large St George’s Hall behind it and while appropriate to the setting is just does not make much of an impact. 

The inscription on the rear face reads:

AS UNKNOWN AND YET WELL KNOWN AS DYING AND BEHOLD WE LIVE.

OUT OF THE NORTH PARTS, A GREAT COMPANY AND A MIGHTY ARMY

It was only dedicated in November 1930 and the delay was attributed to the Lord Mayor who announced that due to the high unemployment he was postponing the appeal for funds. The appeal was finally initiated in 1925.

DRW © 2018 Created 04/08/2018

Updated: 10/06/2018 — 09:33

Gloucester War Memorial


The Gloucester War Memorial is situated on a corner at the entrance to Gloucester Park and may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates  51°51’36.29″N,   2°14’29.40″W.

The plinth is topped with the familiar emblem of the Sphinx that is also found on the badge of the Gloucester Regiment.

The list of names on the memorial may be found at Glosgen –  Gloucester Genealogy.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 30/08/2015.

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:38

Cheltenham Anglo Boer War Memorial

Again one of those “almost fell over it” occurrences while rushing for a bus in Cheltenham. Situated close to the Cheltenham War Memorial in the grounds of the Municipal office in Cheltenham, it is one of three memorials in this space.

The memorial commemorates the Officers, Men and Volunteers from Cheltenham who lost their lives during the Anglo Boer War.

The memorial was unveiled by Lt-Genl Sir Ian Hamilton KCB on 17 July 1907. Google Earth co-ordinates are:  51°53’58.48″N,   2° 4’37.19″W.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 30/08/2015.

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:39

Cheltenham War Memorial

Cheltenham’s War Memorial is located outside the Municipal Offices on the Promenade, with the Long Gardens on either side. It was not an easy one to photograph either, as it is partly in shade and partly in sunlight.

It was unveiled by Maj-Genl Sir Robert Fanshaw K.C.B, D.S.O, on the 1st of October 1921.

Google Earth co-ordinates are:   51°53’56.69″N,   2° 4’39.35″W

The memorial also has plaques dedicated to those who lost their lives in South Arabia 1839-1967, as well as to Polish men and women who lost their lies in the Second World War.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 04/07/2015, more images added 17/05/2017

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:28

Barton Under Needwood War Memorial

The War Memorial in the village of Barton Under Needwood in Staffordshire may be found outside St James’ Parish Church. It is on a small fenced island and the bronze plaques are not easy to read.

The churchyard of St James’ Church  has 8 casualties buried in it, and there are two wall memorials inside the church and a display relating to Private Francis George Keeling who lived in the village and who was killed on the 19th of May 1915. He is remembered on the grave of his brother who is buried in the churchyard. I have created a “community” on Lives of the First World War to commemorate the men on these two memorials

 

 DRW © 2015 – 2018. Created 03/06/2015

Updated: 24/03/2018 — 16:25

Sutton Coldfield War Memorial

Sutton Coldfield War Memorial may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates 52.566082°, -1.824315°. It stands on a traffic circle close to the town hall and is a very impressive memorial.

It was unveiled on 01 November 1922, and consists of single 1.8 metre bronze figure on a 4.6 metre Dalbeattie granite pedestal. There are plaques on three of the faces, covering both World Wars.

The memorial was designed by Francis-Doyle Jones, and cost of the memorial was met by the Voluntary Subscription Fund. It was restored in 1979.

© DRW 2015- 2018. Created 28/04/2015

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:03

War Memorials in Walsall

The town of Walsall in Staffordshire,  has a lot of War Memorials, and rather than creating individual pages for each one, I will rather put them altogether in one page and slowly split them off as I get to them one day. Images open in a new window.

Apart from the Cenotaph, the major memorials are situated in the Council House, and there are 4 that I know of, as well as 3 VC plaques that I did not know of at the time. There are also war memorials at St Matthews Parish Church, as well as St Marys of the Mount Roman Catholic Church.

As far as I am concerned the most spectacular memorial was the Alabaster Memorial by Messrs R Bridgman which must have stood in the St Paul’s Church close to the Council House. This has been “re-invented” and the memorial was moved to the Council House in 2002. There is however still a war memorial in the church, although it is a much smaller one.

War memorial in the former St Pauls church

War memorial in the former St Pauls church

The Alabaster Memorial is a beautiful memorial, and unfortunately it is not easily accessible. I was fortunate that helpful staff did take the time to show it to me, along with 3 other memorials in close proximity to it.

The Alabaster Memorial

The Alabaster Memorial

Information plaque

Information plaque

The next memorial in this particular passage is a Boer War Memorial. Unfortunately the legibility of the memorial is not that great, but the inscription reads as follows:

ERECTED BY PUBLIC SUBSCRIPTION
TO COMMEMORATE THE NAMES OF THE OFFICERS, NON-COMMISSIONED
OFFICERS, AND MEN OF THE 2ND VOLUNTEER BATTALION, SOUTH STAFFORD
SHIRE WHO VOLUNTARILY AND GALLANTLY SERVED THEIR
SOVEREIGN AND COUNTRY IN THE BOER WAR IN SOUTH AFRICA 1900-1

Boer War Memorial

Boer War Memorial

The next Memorial is the Roll of Honour of the Walsall Corporation employees who gave their lives in The Great War.

Wallsal Corporation War Memorial

Wallsal Corporation War Memorial

The final memorial in the council house I could not photograph completely. It is situated in a large hall, and comprises of at least 8 name plaques affixed to the walls of the hall, and 2 large murals flanking the pipe organ on the stage. There was also an addendum plaque to the memorial which was for those who died in service in the Korean and Malayan war, Falklands conflict, Iraq, Afghanistan, Cyprus and Germany.

Walsall Borough War Memorial Dedication

Walsall Borough War Memorial Dedication

Murals flanking the pipe organ

Murals flanking the pipe organ

The church of St Matthew overlooks the city from a hill, and it too has a war memorial, albeit in an awkward place. Photography here was almost impossible, but there are three name plaques that are not visible in the photograph.

St Matthews Parish Church War Memorial

St Matthews Parish Church War Memorial

St Mary of the Mount Roman Catholic Church has a small memorial in the parking lot, dedicated to the men of the parish who died during the two world wars.

St Mary's of the Mount War Memorial

St Mary’s of the Mount War Memorial

I am very sure that there are other memorials in the city and if/when I go back I will track down the three VC plaques, and attempt to obtain images of all the plaques in the Hall at the Council House.

Currently there is only a statue to commemorate John Henry Carless VC, which is situated outside the Library.

John Henry Carless VC

John Henry Carless VC

And at Queen Street Cemetery a small plaque announces that this was the burial place of James Thompson VC. Unfortunately I could not find a physical grave for him, although I do not know whether his grave has been formally restored.

I was really surprised by the memorials I had seen in the city, and I suspect there may be more, although accessing them is always a problem. Who knows what a return trip will reveal. My blogpost about visiting Walsall may be found on my other blog

© DRW 2015- 2018. Created 25/04/2015.

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:07

Walsall Cenotaph

The cenotaph in Walsall, Staffordshire may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates 52.583179°, -1.983704°, it is situated on a small island in the middle of a roundabout.

What does make this cenotaph interesting is that it is located on the site of a bomb which was dropped by Zeppelin ‘L 21’ which killed the town’s mayoress and two others. It was erected on 1 October 1921.


The town also has a large number of War Memorials in it which I will deal with separately.

© DRW 2015- 2018. Created 25/04/2015

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:07

The Hall of Memory, Birmingham

The major War Memorial in Birmingham is the Hall of Memory. I visited it on 10 April 2014, and it was a very pretty structure, although I do expect many people have very little idea of what it is or represents. The Hall of Memory was built to commemorate the 12320 Birmingham citizens who died and the 35000 who were wounded in the First World War.

When I arrived that morning it was still closed (it opens at 10am), so I was able to have a look at the four statues that surround it. Each representing a branch of the armed service as well as the Women’s Service.

Inside the chamber it is solemn, and the centerpiece is a sarcophagus-shaped dais in which are two Rolls of Honour from both World Wars.

A further Roll of Honour is in a glass case behind the main one, and this is for those who lost their lives in further conflicts after the Second World War.

In each of the four corners there are niches that are currently holding the many wreaths and tributes that were made since Remembrance Day, and Poppy Crosses surround the central dias.

Three bas-reliefs are affixed high up on each wall, and they each have a message for those left behind.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them

See to it that they shall not have suffered and died in vain.

Of 150000 who answered the call to arms 12320 fell and 35000 came home disabled

The Hall of Memory was designed by S. N. Cooke and W. Norman Twist and was opened by H.R.H. Prince Arthur of Connaught on 4th July 1925.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 11/04/2015

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 19:46
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