Category: cenotaph

The Fourteenth Army Memorial

In the same space occupied by the Bristol Cenotaph in Magpie Park is the The Fourteenth Army Memorial. 

The Fourteenth Army, also known as the Forgotten Army,  was a multi-national force comprising units from Commonwealth countries during World War II. It’s  operations in the Burma Campaign were easily overlooked by the contemporary press and a memorial to the memory of these men is quite rare to find.

It is a relatively simple memorial though, with a beautiful relief plaque and a simple explanation on the plaque.

 

The Forgotten Army did however leave us one legacy. Known as the Kohima Epitaph it has been incorporated in many military commemoration services.

“When You Go Home, Tell Them Of Us And Say,

For Your Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today”

The Kohima Epitaph is attributed to John Maxwell Edmonds (1875–1958).  

DRW © 2018. Created 22/07/2018

Updated: 22/07/2018 — 18:13

Bristol Cenotaph

The Cenotaph in Bristol may be found at  Google Earth co-ordinates 51.454987°,  -2.596391°. in Magpie Park, Colston Avenue, Bristol. I believe the area around the cenotaph as recently been remodelled so everything is in a reasonably good condition.  War Memorials Register entry

It was unveiled on 26 July 1932, attended by: Field Marshall Sir William Birdwood. There are no names on the memorial, and only two commemoration panels. The panel on the face above is:

SACRED TO THE MEMORY
OF BRISTOL’S SONS AND
DAUGHTERS , WHO MADE
THE SUPREME SACRIFICE.
THEY DIED THAT MANKIND MIGHT LEARN TO LIVE IN PEACE

The opposite side panel reads:

“O VALIANT HEARTS WHO TO YOUR GLORY CAME,
THROUGH DUST OF CONFLICT AND THROUGH BATTLE FLAME:
TRANQUIL YOU LIE, YOUR KNIGHTLY VIRTUE PROVED,
YOUR MEMORY HALLOWED IN THE LAND YOU LOVED:
SPLENDID YOU PASSED THE GREAT SURRENDER MADE.
INTO THE LIGHT THAT NEVERMORE SHALL FADE.
ALL YOU HAD HOPED FOR, ALL YOU HAD, YOU GAVE
TO SAVE MANKIND, YOURSELVES YOU SCORNED TO SAVE.”

There are no names on the Cenotaph.

DRW 2018. Created 22/07/2018

Updated: 22/07/2018 — 17:45

Former St Peter’s Cheltenham War Memorial

I first spotted the church from the 41 bus going to Cheltenham and was always tempted to climb out and take a closer look. The building just has the impressive look about it. However, do not be deceived because it is no longer a church, and it has not been since after 2008. The building  is situated on the south side of the Tewkesbury Road (Google Earth co-ordinates:  51° 54.525’N,  2° 5.445’W) . It is now sign boarded as being a part of “The Rock Youth Charity“.  I took my first images of the church and War Memorial in June 2016.

The memorial can just be seen amongst the trees on the left of the photograph above. It was in a very poor condition and the names were almost illegible.

I went past there once more in October 2017 and there was light at the end of the tunnel as an official notice advised that the memorial was to be refurbished.  In December 2017 work was underway and I made a  mental note to get around there in the new year. That only happened at the end of May 2018 by which time the restoration was complete, the inscriptions and name panels were once again legible and the memorial was looking infinitely better than when I had last seen it.

More importantly it was now possible to read the names on it.

And, the inscription.

The memorial is referenced on the War Memorials Register of the Imperial War Museum.

Alas, our English weather tends to do it’s deed in all seasons and parts of it were already taking on a green hew, but the main thing is that hopefully it will once again become a focus for commemoration and no longer a stone object hidden amongst the trees.

DRW © 2018. Created 03/07/2018

Updated: 17/07/2018 — 06:10

Liverpool Cenotaph

The Cenotaph in Liverpool may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates  53.408540°,  -2.979478°, it is situated in front of St George’s Hall and consists of a  rectangular block of stone on a platform, with bronze, low-relief sculptures on the sides depicting marching troops and mourners. It was designed by Lionel Budden, with carving by Herbert Tyson Smith. It is a Grade I listed building.

​The inscription on the front face reads:

TO THE THE MEN OF LIVERPOOL WHO FELL IN THE GREAT WAR

AND ALL WHO HAVE FALLEN IN CONFLICT SINCE.

AND THE VICTORY THAT DAY WAS TURNED INTO MOURNING UNTO ALL THE PEOPLE

 

This addition to the Cenotaph was unveiled in May 2003 by the Lord Mayor, Councillor Jack Spriggs. The inscription reads: 

THIS PLAQUE COMMEMORATES

THE BATTLE OF THE ATLANTIC

AND THE PIVOTAL ROLE PLAYED BY THE CITY

AND PORT OF LIVERPOOL IN THIS THE

LONGEST AND MOST CRUCIAL SEA AND AIR 

CAMPAIGN OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR

THIS BATTLE LASTED 5 YEARS, 8 MONTHS, 4 DAYS;
HAD IT BEEN LOST, SO TOO WOULD HAVE BEEN THE WAR

BY THE MARKER, LIVERPOOL’S  UNPARALLELED SERVICE
AND SACRIFICE SHALL NOT BE FORGOTTEN.

As far as Cenotaphs go it is really not a very noticeable one, although the carvings are very beautiful. It is really overshadowed by the very large St George’s Hall behind it and while appropriate to the setting is just does not make much of an impact. 

The inscription on the rear face reads:

AS UNKNOWN AND YET WELL KNOWN AS DYING AND BEHOLD WE LIVE.

OUT OF THE NORTH PARTS, A GREAT COMPANY AND A MIGHTY ARMY

It was only dedicated in November 1930 and the delay was attributed to the Lord Mayor who announced that due to the high unemployment he was postponing the appeal for funds. The appeal was finally initiated in 1925.

DRW © 2018 Created 04/08/2018

Updated: 17/07/2018 — 06:11

Gloucester War Memorial


The Gloucester War Memorial is situated on a corner at the entrance to Gloucester Park and may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates  51°51’36.29″N,   2°14’29.40″W.

The plinth is topped with the familiar emblem of the Sphinx that is also found on the badge of the Gloucester Regiment.

The list of names on the memorial may be found at Glosgen –  Gloucester Genealogy.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 30/08/2015.

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:38

Cheltenham Anglo Boer War Memorial

Again one of those “almost fell over it” occurrences while rushing for a bus in Cheltenham. Situated close to the Cheltenham War Memorial in the grounds of the Municipal office in Cheltenham, it is one of three memorials in this space.

The memorial commemorates the Officers, Men and Volunteers from Cheltenham who lost their lives during the Anglo Boer War.

The memorial was unveiled by Lt-Genl Sir Ian Hamilton KCB on 17 July 1907. Google Earth co-ordinates are:  51°53’58.48″N,   2° 4’37.19″W.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 30/08/2015.

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:39

Cheltenham War Memorial

Cheltenham’s War Memorial is located outside the Municipal Offices on the Promenade, with the Long Gardens on either side. It was not an easy one to photograph either, as it is partly in shade and partly in sunlight.

It was unveiled by Maj-Genl Sir Robert Fanshaw K.C.B, D.S.O, on the 1st of October 1921.

Google Earth co-ordinates are:   51°53’56.69″N,   2° 4’39.35″W

The memorial also has plaques dedicated to those who lost their lives in South Arabia 1839-1967, as well as to Polish men and women who lost their lies in the Second World War.

© DRW 2015 – 2018. Created 04/07/2015, more images added 17/05/2017

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:28

Barton Under Needwood War Memorial

The War Memorial in the village of Barton Under Needwood in Staffordshire may be found outside St James’ Parish Church. It is on a small fenced island and the bronze plaques are not easy to read.

The churchyard of St James’ Church  has 8 casualties buried in it, and there are two wall memorials inside the church and a display relating to Private Francis George Keeling who lived in the village and who was killed on the 19th of May 1915. He is remembered on the grave of his brother who is buried in the churchyard. I have created a “community” on Lives of the First World War to commemorate the men on these two memorials

 

 DRW © 2015 – 2018. Created 03/06/2015

Updated: 24/03/2018 — 16:25

Sutton Coldfield War Memorial

Sutton Coldfield War Memorial may be found at Google Earth co-ordinates 52.566082°, -1.824315°. It stands on a traffic circle close to the town hall and is a very impressive memorial.

It was unveiled on 01 November 1922, and consists of single 1.8 metre bronze figure on a 4.6 metre Dalbeattie granite pedestal. There are plaques on three of the faces, covering both World Wars.

The memorial was designed by Francis-Doyle Jones, and cost of the memorial was met by the Voluntary Subscription Fund. It was restored in 1979.

© DRW 2015- 2018. Created 28/04/2015

Updated: 09/01/2018 — 20:03
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