Category: Cemetery

Arthur Herbert Lindsay Richardson VC.

Arthur Herbert Lindsay Richardson (23/09/1872 –  15/12/1932) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at Wolvespruit, about 15 miles north of Standerton, Transvaal, South Africa, on 5 July 1990.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 27229 Page: 5688, reads:

“Lord Strathcona’s Corps

Sergeant Arthur Herbert Lindsey Richardson

On the 5th July, 1900, at Wolve Spruit, about 15 miles north of Standerton, a party of Lord Strathcona’s Corps, only 38 in number, came into contact, and was engaged at close quarters, with a force of 80 of the enemy. 
When the order to retire had been given, Sergeant Richardson rode back under a very heavy cross-fire and picked up a trooper whose horse had been shot and who was wounded in two places and rode with him out of fire. 
At the time when this act of gallantry was performed, Sergeant Richardson was within 300 yards of the enemy, and was himself riding a wounded horse.”

He is buried in St James Cemetery, Liverpool, and the headstone is erected  on the patch of lawn between the cemetery entrance and Liverpool Anglican Cathedral

DRW © 2018. Created 05/06/2018.  Taddy &Co cigarette card by Card Promotions, ©1997, first issued 1902.

Updated: 17/07/2018 — 06:11

The Old Contemptibles Plaque (Southampton)

In my meanderings around cemeteries in the UK I sometimes encounter plaques on the graves of the “Old Contemptibles”. Unfortunately they are not that easy to research because it is easier to research a soldier that died in the war than one who survived.

Just what is an Old Contemptible? Legend has it that Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany, allegedly issued an order on 19 August 1914 to “exterminate … the treacherous English and walk over General French’s contemptible little army”. Hence, in later years, the survivors of the regular army dubbed themselves “The Old Contemptibles”.

Not too many men from the regular army survived the long slog in the trenches, and the survivors often suffered from the effects of the war for the rest of their lives. The grave markers that I see are from the “Old Contemptibles Association”  that was founded by Captain JP Danny, RA, on 25 June 1925. Membership was limited to veterans of the regular army who had served in the British Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders within range of enemy artillery during the period 5 August to 22 November 1914 and had thus taken part in the desperate early battles and retreats before the advancing German forces, before the tide turned and the allies counterattacked at the Battle of the Marne.  The Association had 178 branches in the UK & 14 overseas branches. It produced its own magazine “The Old Contemptible” & all members were known as “chums”.  The Association’s national organisation was wound up in the 1970s but in London and the South East it continued until 1994. (http://www.surreyinthegreatwar.org.uk/story/the-old-contemptibles-association/)

In Southampton, on the side of the former Docks’ Post Office and Telegraph building at Dock Gate 4, there is a plaque commemorating the men who sailed from the port to make history. Erected on 9 April 1950, it was unveiled by by Admiral Sir Algernon Willis, Naval Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth. 

Former docks post office and telegraph building

 

The poem, by Beatrix Price Miller reads:

OH MIGHTY FORCE THAT STOOD FOR ENGLAND!
THAT, WITH YOUR BODIES FOR A LIVING SHIELD,
GUARDED HER SLOW AWAKING, THAT DEFIED
THE SUDDEN CHALLENGE OF TREMENDOUS ODDS
AND FOUGHT THE RUSHING LEGIONS TO A STAND
THEN STARK GRIM ENDURANCE HELD THE LINE,
OH LITTLE FORCE THAT IN YOUR AGONY
STOOD FAST WHILE ENGLAND GIRT HER ARMOUR ON,
HELD HIGH OUR HONOUR IN YOUR WOUNDED HANDS,
CARRIED OUR HONOUR SAFE WITH BLEEDING FEET
WE HAVE NO GLORY GREAT ENOUGH FOR YOU,
THE VERY SOUL OF BRITAIN KEEPS YOUR DAY!
PROCESSION? – MARCHES FORTH A RACE IN ARMS:
AND FOR THE THUNDER OF A CROWD’S APPLAUSE,
CRASH UPON CRASH THE VOICE OF MONSTROUS GUNS,
FED BY THE SWEAT. SERVED BY THE LIFE OF ENGLAND,
SHOUTING YOUR BATTLE-CRY ACROSS THE WORLD.
OH, LITTLE MIGHTY FORCE YOUR WAY IS OURS,
THIS LAND INVIOLATE YOUR MONUMENT.

Grave markers. 

I have seen some of the markers in the cemeteries I have visited and can only find these in my images, it is possible I have missed seeing more by taking a different path or pausing to look at something else. But, I will keep on looking. Sadly, I expect many of the markers have ended up as scrap metal over the years, so these may be quite rare so many years down the line.

A Bagwell, Gloucester Regt

Gloucester Old Cemetery

E Ellis, Royal Field Artillery

Reading Cemetery

WA Marshall, MM. RVL Berkshire Regt

Reading Cemetery

 

GA Janaway, Royal Hampshire Regt.

Hollybrook Cemetery, Southampton

 

H Betterridge, Royal Fusiliers

Streatham Park Cemetery, London

 

Robert W Smith, Grenadier Guards

Gloucester Old Cemetery

   

DRW © 2018. Created 01/02/2018

Updated: 04/06/2018 — 06:21

Prestbury War Memorial

The War Memorial in the village of Prestbury, Gloucestershire may be found at  Google Earth co-ordinates 51.913794°,  -2.042938°. 

The memorial has plaques commemorating men from the village that served in both World Wars. There are a total of 41 names on the memorial and these are available at Remembering.org

The Parish Church of St Mary’s in close to the memorial and there are 5 casualties buried in the churchyard with one private memorial. The church has it’s own war memorial inside it.

The church and memorial are roughly 1 kilometre away from Prestbury Cemetery, that has the Gloucesters Memorial in it, as well as burials from both World Wars.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 04/11/2017

Updated: 12/01/2018 — 07:15

John Joseph Sims VC

John Joseph Sims (1835 – 06/12/1881) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions following the assault on the Redan on 18 June 1855 during the Crimean War.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 659, reads:

“On the 18th June 1855, after his Regiment had retreated back to their trenches following the assault on the Redan, he went out into the open ground, under heavy fire, in broad daylight, and brought in wounded soldiers outside the trenches.”   

Sims died on 6 December 1881, aged 46 in the Union Workhouse, Thavies Inn, City of London from tuberculosis, and was buried in common ground in the City of London Cemetery, Manor Park. On Friday, 11th April 2003, a memorial plaque was placed over the location of his grave. 

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 21/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. 

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:46

George Leslie Drewry VC

George Leslie Drewry (03/11/1894 – 02/08/1918) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions  at V Beach in the Landing at Cape Helles, during the Gallipoli Campaign. on  25 April 1915.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Supplement: 29264, Page: 8132, reads:

Assisted Commander Unwin at the work of securing the lighters under heavy rifle and maxim fire. He was wounded in the head, but continued his work and twice subsequently attempted to swim from lighter to lighter with a line.” 

The men of HMS River Clyde connected to this action were: George Leslie Drewry, Wilfred St. Aubyn Malleson and George McKenzie Samson commanded by Acting Captain Edward Unwin.

He was accidentally killed at Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands, on 2 August 1918, and is buried in the City of London Cemetery, Manor Park, East London.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 21/04/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. Gallaher cigarette card by Card Promotions © 2001, first issued 1915. 

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:47

William Wilson Allen VC

William Wilson Allen (1843 –  12/03/1890) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Battle for Rorke’s Drift in January 1879.

The Citation reads:

“On 22 and 23 January 1879 at Rorke’s Drift, Natal, South Africa, Corporal Allan and another man (Frederick Hitch) kept communication with the hospital open, despite being severely wounded. Their determined conduct enabled the patients to be withdrawn from the hospital, and when incapacitated by their wounds from fighting, they continued, as soon as their wounds were dressed, to serve out ammunition to their comrades during the night.”

He is buried in Monmouth Cemetery, Monmouth, Wales. The surname on the grave is given as Allan as opposed to Allen. 

 

DRW © 2017-2018. Created 26/02/2017. Image courtesy of Mark Green. 

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:30

Angus Buchanan VC, MC

Angus Buchanan (11/08/1894 –  01/03/1944),  was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during  World War One at Falauyah Lines, Mesopotamia,

The Citation reads:

“For most conspicuous bravery. During an attack an officer was lying out in the open severely wounded about 150 yards from cover. Two men went to his assistance and one of them was hit at once. Captain Buchanan, on seeing this, immediately went out and, with the help of the other man, carried the wounded officer to cover under heavy machine gun fire. He then returned and brought in the wounded man, again under heavy fire.”

He was also awarded the Military Cross in 1916, and was mentioned in despatches four times.

He is buried in Coleford Cemetery, Coleford, Gloucestershire.

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 24/02/2107. Image courtesy of Mark Green.

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:30

Sir Frederick Francis Maude VC, GCB

Frederick Francis Maude (20/12/1821 –  20/06/1897) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Crimean Campaign. 

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 21971, Page: 658, reads:

“3rd Regiment, Bt. Lieut.-Colonel Frederick Francis Maude.

For conspicuous and most devoted bravery on the 8th September, 1855, when in command of the covering and Ladder Party of the 2nd Division, on the assault of the Redan, to which he gallantly led his men. Having entered the Redan, he, with only nine or ten men, held a position between traverses, and only retired when all hope of support was at an end, himself dangerously wounded.

He is buried in Brompton Cemetery in London.

© DRW 2013-2018. Created 02/02/2017, edited 04/05/2017

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 20:31

Stoke Newington Civilian War Dead Memorial

The Metropolitan Borough of Stoke Newington Civilian War Dead Memorial may be found in Abney Park Cemetery in London (Google Earth co-ordinates: 51.564451°, -0.077899°).
The legibility of the memorial is poor though, with letters missing from the main inscription.

The inscription reads:

METROPOLITAN BOROUGH OF STOKE NEWINGTON

TO THE MEMORY OF THOSE WHO LOST THEIR LIVES THROUGH ENEMY ACTION IN THE BOROUGH

DURING WORLD WAR 1939-1945 AND IN PARTICULAR OF THOSE WHOSE NAMES ARE INSCRIBED ON THIS MEMORIAL

DEATH IS BUT CROSSING THE WORLD AS FRIENDS DO THE SEA – THEY LIVE IN ONE ANOTHER STILL.

Source: (https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1419855)

There are 113 names inscribed on the memorial, of whom 88 were as a result of a German bomb that made a direct hit on a crowded shelter at Coronation Avenue, just off the High Street on 13th October 1940,  Most people in the Shelter were killed and are listed on the memorial, the list shows that many of the people were Jewish Refugees, There were also 2 persons Unidentified. The memorial also includes the names of 7 of the locations in the borough at which civilians lost their lives during the Second World War. The memorial is listed as Grade II. 

The complete list of names is available on The Roll of Honour Website

© DRW 2017-2018. Created 6/01/2016

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 13:23

William Alfred Savage VC

William Alfred Savage (30/10/1912 – 28/03/1942) was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 28 March 1942 in the attack on St. Nazaire, France, Able Seaman Savage who was a gun-layer of a pom-pom in MGB 314, engaged enemy positions ashore, shooting with great accuracy. Although he had no gun-shield and was in a most exposed position, he continued firing with great coolness until at last he was killed at his gun.

The Citation, recorded in the London Gazette of Issue: 35566, Page: 2225, reads:

“Able Seaman William Alfred Savage, C/JX.173910

For great gallantry, skill and devotion to duty as gunlayer of the pom-pom in a motor gun boat in the St. Nazaire raid. Completely exposed, and under heavy fire he engaged positions ashore with cool and steady accuracy. On the way. out of the harbour he kept up the same vigorous and accurate fire against the attacking ships, until he was killed at his gun.
This Victoria Cross is awarded in recognition not only of the gallantry and devotion to duty of Able Seaman Savage, but also of the valour shown by many others, unnamed, in Motor Launches, Motor Gun Boats and Motor Torpedo Boats, who gallantly carried out their duty in entirely exposed positions against Enemy fire at very close range.”

 

He was killed in the action and is buried in Town Cemetery, Falmouth

 

© DRW 2016-2018. Created 14/01/2016. Image courtesy of Mark Green.

Updated: 11/01/2018 — 13:47
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