Bristol Civilian War Dead Memorial

Bristol has 3 churches that were damaged by bombs in World War 2, and two of them have been left as they were (with minor strengthening) as a memorial to the bombing of the city between 24 November 1940 and 11 April 1941. The “Bristol Blitz” helped fashion the city into what we know today, and I am sure that in my explorations in Arnos Vale Cemetery a number of the graves were of those who died in the bombing.

The church that this post is about is called St Peter’s and may be found in Castle Park.  (Google Earth co-ordinates  51.455358°,  -2.589682°). It is also where the memorial may be found affixed to the wall.

The interior of the church appears to be laid out as a garden but was not accessible and could only really be seen from two spaces unless you were very tall and could reach the window spaces.

The plaques.

(1500 x 820)

The images above are each 1024 high.

The area around the church has been made into gardens and quiet spaces and it was a very attractive space. Whether there is a graveyard I cannot say. 

The second church is at Temple Church and Gardens, and it too is a shell that has been propped up and allowed to become a recreation space. It is a very pretty area. There are more images of this church in my Bristol blogpost

The third church is somewhat of a disaster, only the tower remains and it can only be seen from one side otherwise it is completely hemmed in.  The church was called St Mary-le-Port,  and it is really just an oddity that happens to still exist.

Fortunately St Peter’s is still with us to remind us of what the Second World War wrought in terms of civilian war deaths, It is just a pity that often the real meaning gets lost as more people take these spaces for granted. How long before some group takes offence? who knows. But for the moment those who lost their lives are still remembered.

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